How & Why We Make Our Decisions Part 2 XPM78-01 Möbius 9-14 Aug, 2021

Last week in the post called How & Why do we make all our Decisions on Designing, Building and outfitting XPM78-01 Möbius? I covered how we developed and use our set of four founding or first principles to base all our decisions upon.  We refer to these four pillars as SCEM which stands for Safety, Comfort, Efficiency and Maintenance (lack of).

SCEM boxWe don’t use SCEM as filters per se, we use them to keep us on track, keep our priorities straight, by reminding us of what our fundamental values are for this boat.  When doing our due diligence and research on some potential piece of equipment It is all too easy to get attracted or distracted by things like cool features or just the sheer number of choices and so as we go through our decision making we are constantly circling back through SCEM to make sure these fundamental requirements are being met.


This week in this Part 2 of our decision making process, I will do my best to summarize the more specific criteria we use to ultimately make our final decisions upon.  I will cover this as a series of the following questions that we ask and answer to our satisfaction at least, as we evaluate each bit of kit and then use these to make our call.

  • What problem is this item attempting to solve?
  • Is the problem/item a want or a need?  
  • Consequences of adding this item?  Domino effect?
  • Does it pass the Goldilocks test? 
  • New vs Tried & True?

What problem is this item attempting to solve?

Might sound like a silly question at first but it is surprising how often answering this question provides the most help in in our evaluation of a design decision or of a given piece of equipment.  Let me use our decision of what battery type to use for our House Battery Bank to illustrate but one example of how valuable this question was. 

To put this question into context, keep in mind that Möbius is a completely Battery Based Boat, meaning that ALL of our onboard electrical power comes from our House Battery Bank and therefore this is one of THE most critical systems on the boat and one that in some cases our lives can depend upon.  For an XPM or any true eXpedition boat that is going to be able to carry us safely and comfortably to locations across the full spectrum of eXtremes of climate and remoteness, we need to be as self sufficient as possible and so our onboard electrical power rates right up there alongside diesel fuel and fresh (potable) water as a critical requirement.  An XPM type boat is designed to spend the majority of its time at anchor or at sea, in our case often for months at a time, so in all our design and equipment decisions, we assume that we will have no shore based resources such as shore power, stores, shipping, airports, etc.. 

XPM Electrical System w 4 Batt BanksFinally, for a bit more context, let me add that we have also chosen to not have an independent generator onboard so ALL of our four voltages, 12 & 24 Volt DC and 120 & 230 Volt AC, come from our House Battery Bank.  Most of the time we keep our batteries charged via our 4.48kW array of 14 320W Solar Panels and when underway we have 12-14kW available from the two eXtremely robust 250A @ 28V Electrodyne alternators which Mr. Gee keeps spinning.
One of the very first decisions we needed to make to chose our batteries was what type or chemistry of batteries would be the Goldilocks just right, just for us House Batteries?  I’m not going to go over this in any detail here but these are the five battery types we had to chose from:

  • FLA;  Flooded Lead Acid
  • AGM:  Absorbed Glass Matt
  • GEL: 
  • Carbon Foam
  • Lithium

Many of you and others we talked to, thought for sure that the choice was obvious; go with Lithium and we did consider them, and all the other types, very thoroughly.  But it was that question of “What problem is this trying to solve” that made it clear that Lithium was not the best choice for us and that’s the story I’d like to elaborate on here a bit.

Victron Gel-OPzV-1000ah-batteriesOur battery decision making started at the very beginning of our design process, around 2016, and in some ways we designed and built the boat around the House Batteries. For the first few years, we thought we would go with GEL based OPzV batteries such as this one.

These OPxV type batteries are eXtremely robust and often referred to as “traction batteries” as they are used in things like all electric forklifts in warehouses so they had good cycle life and good resistance to sulfation and other features that wold make them a good choice for Möbius.

During this time we were reading more and more about Lithium batteries and we were seeing more and more people who were choosing to go with them so we also spent a good bit of time researching the various types and makes of Lithium, primarily LiFePO4 or Lithium Iron.  This relatively new type of battery was said to have a lot of amazing features with the top ones being longer lasting (more cycle life), ability to accept much higher charging rates thus take less time to charge, but perhaps the biggest feature was their much higher energy density.  This means that you get much more usable Watts from the same amount of space and weight compared to what you would get from other battery types.  Said another way, you could get the same amount of energy out of a much smaller size and lighter battery bank.

As the months and years went by, these claims were validated more and more and we saw the steady increase of Lithium Iron being the batteries of choice for more and more boats so it seemed like the choice was clear right?  However when we applied our criteria and use case and asked the “What problem is Lithium trying to solve?” question, we realized that we didn’t have the same “problems” as most of these other boats such as size and weight of our House Batteries. 

My earlier comment that we had designed the boat around our House Battery Bank is not that far off as we had designed the hull to take maximum advantage of the characteristics of our original consideration of OPzV batteries which were very large and very heavy.  Each OPzV 2/4V cell measured 215mm/8.5” Wide x 277mm/10.9” Deep x 855mm/33.6” High and weighed 110kg/242lbs each, and we needed 24 of these! 
FireFly House battery bankAs we often do, we turned this “bug” into a feature and built four large battery compartments into the framing of the bottom of the hull such that each compartment straddled the 25mm thick x 350mm high keel bar running down the centerline of the hull.  By positioning these battery compartments on the very bottom and center of the hull, we effectively turned the lead in our batteries into a proxy for some of the lead ballast we needed.  This is a photo from last year of one of our four battery compartments.

The point here if you are following along with me is that for the use case and design of an XPM, the “problem” that Lithium batteries would solve with their high energy density for a given weight and size just wasn’t a problem we had; we had the room and we wanted the weight.  So the search for our Goldilocks batteries continued.


FireFly L15  4V-battery photoFor awhile we continued to think that OPzV Gel batteries were the best fit for us, however, just as we had been following the developments of Lithium batteries we had also been tracking the growing use of Carbon Foam type batteries from FireFly.
They ticked all the boxes on our list of criteria, most notably these were proving to be eXtremely robust and several attempts by test labs trying to purposely destroy these batteries failed and they proved to be almost indestructible which is a huge factor for us and our use case.
FireFly House battery bank with DC control panelThese Carbon Foam batteries are also able to work and charge in much lower temperatures such as those we expect to have when we are in polar regions of the world and they are one of the only battery types that don’t suffer from sulfation. and are happy, even recommended, to stay at Partial State of Charge for long periods of time which would normally be the death of most other batteries.


Near the end I found real world installations of these batteries, some of which had been in place for more than ten years and so just before placing this large order of batterie we changed and ordered 24 of these 4V  L15+ size Micro Carbon Foam batteries which now make up our 43.2kW House Bank (1800Ah @ 24V) made by FireFly and they have been working flawlessly for the past six months.

Let me be clear that I am NOT saying that Lithium batteries are not a great choice for many boats, nor am I saying that Carbon Foam batteries are “the best”, I am just hoping to explain how and why we made our decision to go with Carbon Foam and why they are the Goldilocks just right, just for us choice.  All thanks in part to the question we regularly ask near the beginning of our decision making process; What problem is this trying to solve?

Is the problem/item a want or a need?  

We often put each item we are trying to decide on into either the Need to Have or Wish/Want to Have category.  Pretty self explanatory I think, Need to Have are items that we feel are mandatory must haves in order for us to feel confident in going to sea and living full time aboard Möbius.  Examples for us include things like;

  • our high output watermaker,
  • Furuno Radar and other navigation equipment,
  • eXtremely high amounts of acoustic & audio insulation,
  • comfortable Helm Chairs,
  • that little FLIR One thermal camera I used to find the overheated wiring a few weeks ago,
  • great HVAC systems
  • Global communication capability (right now via our Iridium GO)
  • and items like this.

The Want/Wish to Have category can be subdivided into groups such as;

  • buy as soon as the budget allows
  • later when it is ready for real world use (ours)
  • nice to have, perhaps a gift to ourselves or each other

Current examples on our Wish/Want list includes things like:

  • second Furuno Radar with NXT technology,
  • forward facing sonar when it is has been in more mainstream use and is robust enough for our use case
  • active stabilization, most likely Magnus Effect type
  • kite sail with autopilot to add to our propulsion and reduce fuel usage
  • Portland Pudgy, Christine’s long time wish for a small, light sailing dingy
  • affordable high speed internet such as that being promised by 5G and satellite based systems being developed.

We also have a third category worth mentioning which is the Don’t Want Onboard category which is sometimes the best choice.  Items on this list would include things like;

  • anything that requires propane (too much of a pain to fill around the world)
  • anything that requires gasoline (too short a shelf life these days)
  • Generator
  • Guns/weapons

Consequences of adding this item? 

As a good friend and fellow world sailor likes to say “Everything needs” and so we spend time trying to imagine what the needs and other consequences will be if we add this bit of kit to Möbius.  Our primary prioritization of Maintenance, lack thereof, would factor into this for example and hence decisions such as;

  • no paint/wood/SS on the exterior,
  • being single fuel boat with no propane or gasoline,
  • no generator

but it could also be other consequences of adding this item to our boat.  An XPM is complex by virtue of needing to be so self contained and as we often say Möbius is like a floating village in that we have to look after making all our own water, all our own energy, dealing with all our own waste and so on, but we do strive to apply the KISS or Keep It Simple & Safe philosophy to all our decisions by finding the simplest solution possible.  Examples of this would include:

  • manual roll attenuation with our fully mechanical/manual Paravane A-Frames
  • manual Tender Davit system vs hydraulic
  • Gardner engine (no turbo, no electrics, low revs, etc.)

Domino Effect?

The Domino Effect is perhaps a branch of the consideration of the Consequences of any decision as I just outlined above and is when the result of a decision has follow on effects to other systems on that boat.  This can work both ways; sometimes these dominos are positive ones and in other cases they are negative or undesirable consequences.  For example, installing the eXtreme amount of EPDM and acoustic insulation throughout the boat has a domino effect;

  • stabilizes the interior temperatures and makes them more temperate in both very hot and very cold climates
  • this reduces the energy required to cool/heat the boat
  • this allows us to install smaller capacity and less expensive HVAC systems such as Air Conditioning and heating
  • this lowers the demand on our House Batteries and HVAC systems so they run with less loads and last longer

An example of when the Domino Effect can work the opposite direction might be the option we considered of installing fin type active stabilizers.  These work extremely well to reduce the roll in many conditions when on passages but they would also introduce a Domino Effect of consequences that took them out of the running for us, such as;

  • their protrusion from the side of the hull reduces the safety factor when in areas with uncharted rocks, coral heads and the inevitable groundings on these.
  • not suitable when ice is present in polar waters
  • unlikely but possible if a fin is hit hard enough to create an underwater breach of the hull
  • are extremely complex and often top the lists of most maintenance problems we read from other global passage makers.
  • most require a significant hydraulic system to operate which adds yet another whole system onboard to maintain and repair.

Magnus Effect illustrationI might add that having gone through this Domino Effect as we considered active fin stabilization, it also helped us see that we could find a different type of active stabilization if we should ever want that, and one that eliminates most of the dominos I listed above.  This would be stabilizers that use the Magnus Effect which is offered by several different manufacturers now.

Does it pass the Goldilocks test? 

We essentially answer this question by virtue of having gone through all the questions and priorities I’ve already listed.  Because we have highly personalized our overarching principles of SCEM and articulated much more detailed specifics of our use case, our decision making helps us ensure that we are making choices and decisions that are by definition, Goldilocks, just right, just for us.

However, this is such an important factor for us that we do keep coming back to to this “Goldilocks Test” to make sure we are avoiding the tendency to “go with the flow” of following what others are doing or “the way its always been done” and are staying true to ourselves and our preferences.  I will site a more “meta” example here which is our decision in the design phase to “upsize” the length of the boat from the 18-20m / 60-65 ft that we initially imagined and then at the same time “downsize” the interior to have just 2 cabins and 2 heads.

Our decision to extend the length to 24m/78ft was driven two factors; simple physics that hull speed is a factor of Length on the Waterline and our discovery that contrary to popular opinion there is not very many restrictions on boats that are over 20 meters whereas there are some very significant changes to the rules governing ships that are over 24 meters.  With our prioritization of efficiency, we pushed the length to just under 24 meters.  With our infrequent use of marinas the increased docking fees do not affect us very much.  Furthermore, with more and more catamarans being purchased, many marinas are changing their dock rates to be calculated based on overall area of each boat, LOA x Beam and so our slender 5m Beam reduces our overall area and we are often cheaper or about the same as much shorter but wider boats.

Our decisions to “downsize” the interior and thus reduce maintenance and costs was based on the fact that 99% of the time Christine and I are the only two people living onboard so we wanted to make the interior fit us and our needs.  Our Master Cabin is very spacious and luxurious for us.  Our Guest Cabin works very well when we do have guests onboard but most of the time it is a very purposefully designed Office for Christine Kling, the Captain’s nom de plume when she is working on her next book and running her growing book business.  Our SuperSalon is indeed living up to that name the more we live in it.  And my very full size Workshop and Engine Room is that of my dreams. 

There are many other examples of how the Goldilocks Test has driven our decisions such as;

  • Manual Paravane system and Tender Davit that is KISS and as former sailors handling lines, winches and clutches is second hand.
  • Though we designed and built the cabinets, electrical and plumbing for them, we chose not to install either a Dryer or a Dishwasher as we are just not fans of either one and prefer washing and drying by hand.

I could give countless more examples of how we have applied the Goldilocks Test to almost every decision we have made during the design and the building process but I think you get the idea.  We have now been living aboard Möbius since she first launched in February and we are finding that our continuous use of this Goldilocks Test has worked eXtremely well for us in designing and building Möbius and we can and do recommend it highly for almost all decisions and choices you make.

New vs Tried & True?

Christine and I are self described nerds and geeks so we have a great fondness for technology that is on that well named “bleeding edge” and we have a full compliment of devices to show for it.  However, when it comes to equipment for Möbius, and especially all of it that is on that Must Have list, it must be remembered all those decisions must be made within the context that Möbius is an XPM type boat that is designed and built to live up to that acronym for eXtreme eXploration Passage Maker.  So when it comes to deciding on equipment, materials, construction and design of these items, they must, all be Tried & True.  To us this means equipment that has been in regular use on boats, ideally with similar use cases as ours, for several years and has stood that test of time.

Some examples of this for us include:

  • we delayed our decision to go with FireFly Carbon Foam batteries until after we had been able to find enough examples of these batteries being installed in other people’s boats in large numbers for many years.
  • We chose to go with all Furuno for navigation because it is so widely used by commercial boats in fishing fleets, government agencies and the like and hence this equipment is designed and built for continuous 24/7 use in some eXtremely harsh conditions.  They also have an excellent reputation for their continued support of even their oldest equipment.
  • Our decision to go with a Gardner 6LXB engine that is still one of the most efficient diesel engines ever produced and is still in use in thousands of commercial boats worldwide.  It is also perhaps one of the best examples of the KISS approach to design and engineering which adds to how well it passes the Tried & True test.
  • individual MPPT controllers for each of our 14 solar panels as this has been well proven to be the most efficient combination for both overall efficiency, least affected by shading and highest redundancy.

Let me end with a final example of the value of taking this Tried & True test for mission critical ships and equipment from no less than the US Navy!
US Navy Gerald Ford aircraft carrierA recent article caught my eye a few weeks ago where even the us Navy has learned the folly of installing untested equipment on their ships.  This link to the article  USS Gerald R. Ford Problems: The Navy Admits Its Big Mistake (popularmechanics.com) provides a brief but telling story.
US Navy Gerald Ford aircraft carrier side viewas outlined in that article the Chief of Naval Operations, Mike Gilday, says the U.S. Navy built the aircraft carrier USS Ford with too many new technologies. such that now, the Ford is several years behind in its life cycle because of problems with many of those new technologies.

  • The last of the Ford’s four advanced weapon elevators, the most glaring example of the ship’s tech gone wrong, should enter service later this year.
  • When the Navy first built the Ford, it incorporated nearly two dozen new technologies, some of which are still giving the service headaches 4 years after the ship entered the fleet.  Those delays meant the Navy only commissioned the Ford in 2017, despite laying it down in 2009. Even then, problems lingered, especially with the electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) and the advanced weapon elevators (AWEs).
  • The ship’s first full deployment, originally scheduled for 2018, is now set for 2022.

I think this unfortunate real world example does help to make the point that for XPM types of boats with use cases to match, all the “mission critical” equipment onboard MUST have passed the Tried & True test.

Bubble Bubble, Toil & Trouble!

PXL_20210811_143412922.MPLeaving you with the latest bit of kit that Captain Christine just approved and installed onboard, a fully manual sparkling water maker!  Especially in these hot summer months, Christine particularly enjoys her cold sparkling water and I do too but we don’t like having to buy it in cases of plastic bottles.  We have our watermaker for similar reasons for our regular drinking water.  Initial tests have elicited the same smile you see here so this item has now passed the all important Captain’s Test and has been welcomed aboard.
Thanks so much for making it this far if you have and I do hope that this slightly different format and content is of interest and value to most of you.  Let me know either way with your comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below and I’ll be back with more for you same time next week.

-Wayne

Navigating Our Way to the End of this eXtremely Long & Winding Tunnel XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 22-28 March 2021

Alas, the milestone of moving under our own power has eluded us for another week but next week is looking very promising for Möbius’ first of many sea trials.  We continue to experience a series of “installation issues” that have prevented our Kobelt hydraulic steering system and Kobelt Throttle/Pitch controls to work as they should and so without steering and propulsion we haven’t been going too far other than being towed.  But the fuel economy has been fabulous!

As with last week, with less progress than usual and not much of it being very visual, I don’t have as much content as usual for this week’s Show & Tell Progress Update, but grab a comfy seat and something tasty to drink and let’s get started with what I can show you about the past week of March 22-28, 2021.

Nazar Boncuğu Keeps Us Safe!

Many of you may already be familiar with Nazar Boncuğu aka “Turkish Evil Eye” as they are the most popular tourist souvenir of all and these captivating cast glass blue eyes have found themselves being transported to homes and boats all over the world, including ours.  As is the tradition, we have one right outside the front door of our apartment for the past 3+ years.  When Christine and I first came to Turkey back in 2014 so Christine could do her meticulous research for her next book at the time which became Knight’s Cross, we saw these Turkish Eyes warding off evil spirts on the bows almost every fishing boat in the many harbours we visited so of course we had to have them on Möbius’ bow too!


PXL_20210328_151430390While they can be found in shops almost everywhere, we wanted the Goldilocks Just Right version of Nazar Boncuğu and last week Christine spotted these two beauties in a specialty glass shop in Antalya and knew that these were it! 

As you can see in this photo, right now our pair are basking in the sun atop one of our Ro$ewood Galley Garages where they do look resplendent with the light coming off the water, but they are destined to be securely adhered to the bow next week so do stay tuned for those shots.


Do I See Light at the End of this eXtremely Looooong and Winding Tunnel?

Majuro to Suva Google MapsIn many ways, this whole adventure began back in March 2015 when Christine and I were making the 3000nm passage from Majuro in the Marshall Islands, down to Suva in Fiji. 
P1020320We had spent almost a year in Majuro which we are very much looking forward to returning to on our previous 52ft steel sailboat Learnativity and we had an awemazing 3 week passage down to …..
Map of Kiribati and more. ………. Suva with stops along the way at the island nations of Kiribati and Tuvalu along the way.
Voyaging Under Power Beebe 4th editionI had given Christine a copy of Robert Beebe’s “passagemaking bible” Voyaging Under Power and she was reading it on the passage down to Fiji and we would discuss it a lot as we sailed south.  Over the course of that 2+ week passage, we both became more and more aware of just how different passagemaking under power would be compared to sailing which we both knew and loved so much. 

By the time we got to Suva we had made the transition from thinking of switching from sail to power as a fun joke to being a real vision of our future.  As do most adventures I think, certainly most of mine, they begin when you start following your curiosity and now, six years later, we can see that this was when the adventure of designing and building Project Goldilocks, as we called it at the time,

In those six years we have gone from a very big vision to an eXtremely big reality and the path along the way has been like most of our adventures, one that includes several storms and other challenges along the way but always worth it for the joys at the end as one adventure transitions into the next.  We are not quite at the end of this latest adventure as the build continues, but we are now living more and more onboard and we grown increasingly eXcited about bringing this adventure to a close and beginning the next one back out on the ocean, eXperiencing the new storms and joys of what promises to be a very different type of voyaging under power for the first time.

Installation Issues Getting Resolved

The most recent set of “storms” for us has been a series of what I will simply refer to as “installation issues” which we have needed to resolve before we can begin to voyage under power for the first time on our first of what will be many, sea trials to shake as many gremlins out of the brand new Möbius and have as much of what is often referred to as “infant mortality” as possible before we finally leave Antalya in our wake.  This less than appealing term “infant mortality” is actually quite accurate in the context of a newly built custom boat as it refers to the several cases we are sure to have where brand new equipment and a brand new boat, will have items that are DoA or have not been installed correctly and fail to work as they should.  So far we have had very few new bits of kit that have been DoA on arrival but we have had a number of installation problems that have been keeping us from being able to go on our first voyage under power; our first sea trial!

This past week I have been working closely with our new electrician Ismail and along with some continuing eXemplary technical support from Lance, Keivan and Hicham at Kobelt Canada.  I have been working with Lance to design our steering and control systems for about four years now all together, and I can’t say enough about all of them at Kobelt who have been up in the very early morning for them in Vancouver, late evening for me here in Antalya, in order that we can do some live video calls for a techie version of Show & Tell as we went through hydraulic setups, wiring and they could watch what the moving components were doing, hear the sounds when they mattered and really be as close to being here in person with me as is possible.  As it turns out, all of the equipment from Kobelt arrived working as designed but the extensive list of items involved from hydraulic pumps, cylinders and valves to electronic controls and autopilot systems have been installed over the past 18 months and we are only now connecting all the parts together and there have been some issues along the way.

Three weeks ago the problem was that we weren’t getting pressure to the hydraulic steering cylinders, then two weeks ago we were having a long lag in time between when the Throttle or Pitch control levers were moved at one of the Helm Stations and when the lever on the Actuator box in the Engine Room moved and hence when the Throttle/Pitch cables and levers moved.  This past week we have been having difficulty getting the CPP Pitch Angle Gauges at each helm to communicate the correct Pitch Angle as the Pitch Control Levers were moved Ahead/Astern.  It goes as does most problem solving, you trace your way back to where you began, compare the schematics and guidelines from the manufacturers to the actual “as built” installation and you find the differences between those and fix them.  Sounds simple, and it is, but it sure can take time and effort to follow these long and winding paths.

PXL_20210328_120149743Perhaps it has been thanks to those two Turkish Evil Eyes being onboard that we have been on a solution per week schedule and the first two problems had been resolved in the previous two weeks, and I am delighted to report that as of last night (Saturday 27th March here) Ismail and I have the Pitch Angle gauges working and mounted back where they belong at each Helm Station!  We have tested all this with here at the dock Mr. Gee thrumming away and our Nogva CPP churning the clear waters underneath making Möbius tug at her dock lines.  Once all the other critical jobs have been finished such as finishing the deck hatches so they all close and seal properly, finishing and testing the fire hose and a still rather long punch list of other jobs, we will be *almost* good to go!


Almost, because there remains one last major and eXtremely critical system that needs to be finished before Möbius is seaworthy enough for her first sea trials; Navigation System.  This involves getting the key elements of our whole Furuno Navigation system working and configured as this includes things like our Radar, AutoPilots, VHF radio, AIS (Automatic Information System) and all the related screens, computers and black boxes which controls all that navigation equipment.  Good on that front is that Captain Christine has been leading her very own team of technicians which Naval has sub-contracted with to assist with getting the eXtremely multi-faceted navigation system of hardware and software all wired, inter-connected and configured.

For those interested in the details of our navigation system and to give the rest of you an idea of what all is involved, here is a quick overview of some of the individual bits of kit Christine and I have pulled together to build our Steering & Navigation system**

** FYI, on the Mobius.World blog site, there is a complete list of all the equipment in all the systems on Möbius available under the tab at the very top ribbon called “The Boat” which you can see by clicking HERE.

Here is the list of the components in our Steering, Navigation and Communications systems which are very intertwined:

STEERING SYSTEM
  • Primary STEERING x2 Kobelt Designed dual fully redundant hydraulic systems
  • 2x Kobelt Accu-Steer HPU400 pumps
  • 2x Kobelt 7080-B12 Balanced cylinders
  • STEERING Controls x2 Kobelt NFU jog levers @ Main & Upper Helms
  • Kobelt 7176 wired “Walk About” handheld remote station @ both Helms
  • auto pilots x2 Furuno 711C Auto Pilots, 2 independent units for redundancy
  • Steering Backup………. Kobelt manual hydraulic pump @ Main Helm w/ steering wheel
  • Emergency Tiller stored in ER, attaches direct to Tiller Arm w/ block & tackle controllers
  • NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT
  • main helm monitors… 2x LiteMax NavPixel 19” touchscreen 1600 nits @ 1280 x 1024
  • 1x 43” LiteMax Durapixel sunlight readable 1600 nits @ 3840×2160
  • 1x Samsung 50” SmarTV
  • upper SkyBridge monitors x2 LiteMax NavPixel 24” touch, 1000 nits @ 1920 x 1080
  • Navigation software x2 Time Zero Professional w/ Sounder + Radar modules
  • x1 RosePoint Coastal Explorer
  • x3 Navionics on Tablets
  • charts:….. Full set of Navionics World Mega-Wide charts on Furuno/TimeZero
  • Full set of Navionics/C-Map charts on Coastal Explorer
  • Main helm PC………. Micro ATX tower
  • Intel I7-9700, 16GB Ram, 1TB SSD, GTX 1660 6G OC Graphics card
  • Skybridge PC Kingdell Fanless mini PC, Intel I7-1051 16GB Ram, 512GB SSD
  • gateways:… RosePoint Nemo, NEMA 0183/2000, TCP/UDP, RS-422, RS-232, RJ45 ethernet
  • Maretron USB100 USB Gateway
  • Maretron IPG100 IP ethernet Gateway
  • AIS x3…………….. Emtrak A-200 Class A
  • Standard Horizon AIS B Class in GX6000 VHF radio
  • Tender = Vesper XB-8000 smartAIS Transponder w/ WiFi + NMEA2000 gateway
  • Weather station ….. Airmar 220 WX
  • w/ ultrasonic wind, barometer, 3 axis accelerometer, gyro + compass
  • Infra-red night vision….. FLIR Gyro stabilized camera M332
  • radar… Furuno FAR 1523 Radar Black Box with 6’ open array
  • heading compass……… Furuno SC33 Satellite compass
  • GPS Furuno GP330 GPS head dedicated to Radar
  • Standard Horizon GPS Head into GX6000 VHF radio
  • Standard Horizon GPS Smart Antenna SCU-31
  • Vesper GPS Head into XB-8000 in Tender
  • remote controllers x2:…… Furuno MCU004 Monitor Controller on Helm Chairs
  • Kobelt 7018 “WalkAbout” handheld wired remote @ both Main and Upper Helms
  • depth sounders x2
  • @Bow = Furuno BBDS1 bottom discriminating Black Box w/ 5205PSD transducer
  • @Stern = Furuno Ultrasonic UDST800 depth, speed, temp traducer
  • COMMUNICATIONS/MONITORING EQUIPMENT
    • VHF RADIO.. Standard Horizon GX6000 w/ AIS + NMEA2000
    • w/ AIS + SART target display & GPS Compass
    • RAM 4 remote mic @ Main Helm
    • Wireless mic w/access point
    • loudhailer….. Standard Horizon Dual Zone 25W PA / Loud Hailer
    • with preprogrammed fog signals + Listen Back
    • Horn………. Kahlenburg S-330 air horn
    • Satellite coms…………. Iridium GO!
    • Data logger…. Yacht Devices Voyage Recorder YDVR-04
    • Search light………. ACR Artex RCL-95 Pan/Tilt/Zoom 500W Searchlight w/ Remote
    • Monitoring….. Maretron monitoring system
    • Including All: bilges, tanks, batteries, engine, fuel flow, smoke & heat, etc..
    • Viewed on any screen and remotely via Maretron N2K View
    • on boat networking… NMEA 2000 N2K dual backbone 2000 network throughout
    • Multiplexers for NMEA 0183 + RS432
    • Gateways via USB & IPG
    • Victron, and Maretron networks for monitoring
    • IP Cameras. Forward facing IP camera mounted on Skybridge roof
    • Aft Facing camera above swim step
    • Reolink Bullet IP camera engine room
    • Reolink Dome IP camera engine room
    • Video encoder. Axis Camera Encoder
    • WiFi Antenna. Microtik Groove 52 AC Wi-fi antenna
    • WiFi booster … WeBoost Drive Reach
    • Cellular antenna…….. Wilson Wide Band Omni-Directional Marine Antenna for cellular
    • ROUTER……. PepWave Max Transit Duo router
    • Network Access Storage. Synology NAS Disk Station w/ 2X 8 GB Seagate Barracuda drives

    Well, you get the idea, there is a LOT of moving parts to this puzzle.

    PXL_20210326_161615508And as you can see here, some of those moving parts are often crowded around Captain Christine at the Main Helm in this case!  Yunus on the far Right is the the manager of this connection and configuration team and Erdal with the toque in the middle is the lead technician and they have been a true treat to work with.
    PXL_20210327_055755582Some of the “moving parts” are blinking lights such as this set on the back of just three of our network switches in one of three “Internet Alcoves” as Christine calls them.  Strange though, we have “cut the cord” more than most people ashore and Isn’t it great that we are living in a wireless world!
    PXL_20210327_055813348Zooming out a bit of that alcove to show you that it really is quite small but it does have even more hardware!
    PXL_20210326_164225899Another very “wireless” alcove, this one behind the 50” monitor and home of Boat Computer #1 and the Synology NAS on the Left side of the Main Helm.
    PXL_20210327_120112773Out on the Aft Deck looking up at the Main Arch and the Tender Davit on the Left, to show you yet another very “wireless” area along the Arch where all of our external navigation and communication equipment resides.

    One eXciting milestone this week has been seeing that 6ft Open Array antenna spinning around for the first time on our Furuno FAR 1523 Radar!
    PXL_20210327_154137661.MPMy favorite Geekette, aka Capn’ Christine aka my Beautiful Bride, is a wee bit shy but I was able to at least get her hand in this shot as she tilts the two 19” LiteMax screens at the Main Helm to show how she now has TimeZero running charts on the Left and an awemazing amount of detail of the seabed below us thanks to our Furuno BBDS “Black Box Bottom Discriminating Sounder” where we can watch individual fish swimming below Möbius’ hull and details of the composition of the sea bead down to about 75 feet below the “top of the bottom”. 
    PXL_20210327_154243872.MPI will leave you with this shot of the view at your eye height when sitting in the Captain’s Chair here at the Main Helm.  Now, if we can just get past that sea wall …………………..

    Thanks for joining us again for another week in the adventure of Project Goldilocks.  Please be sure to leave any and all comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below and I hope you will join us again next week for what I hope will be the report of our first sea trials!  Wish us luck!  We will need it!

    -Wayne

    Möbius on the Move Progress Update 15-20 March 2021

    Not as much for this week’s Show & Tell as the Commissioning Phase is now underway which mostly involves setting up and testing all the many systems onboard which doesn’t yield much visual interest.  It is not too much of a stretch to say that the systems on an eXtreme eXploration Passage Maker like XPM78-01 Möbius are similar to what a floating village would require.  Given the eXtremely remote locations we favor we often have no support systems ashore or when on passage and so we need to be completely self sufficient with what we have onboard.  For example we need to be able to do all of the following for an indefinite amount of time and be our own:

    • Power Plant to generate all our electrical power; 12 & 24V DC and 120 & 240V AC
    • Water Utility able to create and store all our own Domestic Fresh Water and Domestic Hot Water
    • Sewage Treatment Plant able to pipe and store all Black Water (sewage)
    • Grey Water Treatment Plant able to pipe and store (drainage from all showers & sinks)
    • Telecom Utility looking after all our own cellular, WiFi and satellite communications.
    • Weather Station maintaining up to date and highly accurate weather at all times is a BIG factor in keeping us safe, knowing where to be and more importantly where NOT to be at any given time and what anchorage is best for any given day’s weather.
    • Navigation System allowing us to know in great detail what is all around us both above and below the waterline in order to plot our routes safely.
    • Full Repair Shop.  Christine and I are the only two people on board and so if something breaks or needs fixing or maintaining, as we often say “If these four hands don’t or can’t do it; it doesn’t get done.  So we need both all the knowledge, skills and tools to fix every system and every piece of equipment onboard.
    • Equipment & Supply Store.  We need to carry any and all parts and supplies that are needed to service and maintain all these systems and again, if it isn’t onboard, it doesn’t exist in our world.

    I could go on for some time but you get the idea.  The Commissioning Phase we are now in is all about getting all the components in all those systems up and running and getting them all adjusted so they work correctly and together.  So while there isn’t as much to show and tell you about this week, there is a LOT of things going on in this critical phase.  So without any further delay, come along for this week’s update for the week of March 15-20, 2021.

    One important announcement before we begin.


    4AA5CF9E-7315-4AE9-8BE9-1B500A08A551We had an eXtremely eXciting start to this week when Captain Christine began her next circumnavigation of the Sun.  I won’t give away the number of her new circumnavigation, let’s just say that the two digits add up to Lucky 13!  We are sleeping on the boat now so I was able to have her wake up to this little surprise on Monday morning.

    Möbius on the Move!

    For a boat that is still experiencing a number of “installation issues” that are preventing Möbius from being able to move under her own power, we have sure been doing a lot of moving! 

    Free Zone   Setur Google Earth labelledI’ve grabbed this shot from Google Earth to help show our different locations over the past few weeks.

    Position #1 is where we have spent the most time on the End Dock Wall.  #2 is where we were sandwiched between the Green and Red/White boats on the Side Dock Wall and #3 is where we are now on the outside wall of Setur Marina.


    PXL_20210313_142345861As you may recall from last week’s post our first move was to be towed off Position #1 on the end wall of the harbour over to #2 on the side wall between the big Green Monster and the Red/White power cat.
    PXL_20210316_124533376.MPThis was our new view looking off our bow to the now empty end wall where we had been at position #1 for the past 2 weeks.

    PXL_20210315_072122770The reason for that move was because the little guy on the Right here was coming in to dock and get loaded up.
    PXL_20210315_072138399As you can see there was barely enough dock space for our two little Red tugs, let alone us or any other boats.
    PXL_20210316_143609949After loading that ship up he left and we were able to move back over to the end wall.
    PXL_20210316_143810780One of the small harbour tugs came and hip tied himself to our Port side and quickly moved us back to the end wall again.
    IMG_1236That lasted until late afternoon on Thursday when we suddenly got the call that they needed to move us again because another long cargo ship was on its way in to dock on the end wall.
    PXL_20210319_061831802If you look closely at the photo above (click to enlarge any photo), you will see that a new Coast Guard boat was now in our previous spot #2 between the Green and Red/White boats and so the only option was for them to move us over to Setur Marina which is only a few hundred meters away.
    3E27B1A3-0633-4210-AB3F-9CA38614EED6With the help of the marina staff we Med Moored to this new dock #3 at the marina using two of the marina’s lines to our bow and then lines off both stern quarters to the dock.
    1E001C01-96DE-4238-9EB3-054203A4BC5FThis is where I am typing this post right now and while our stay is temporary, Christine and I have been enjoying this first sight of Möbius tugging at her dock lines with Mother Ocean just off our bow and calling our name eXtremely loudly!

    INTERIOR WORK

    PXL_20210315_081546491.MPRamazan and I were able to get several of the remaining cabinetry jobs done in the Super Salon this past week.  He pulled out this back wall behind the 43” monitor on the far Right/Stbd side of the Main Helm and cut the slots for the return air to the Stbd Air Handler.
    PXL_20210315_081539026It is a bit of a shame that this beautiful Ro$ewood panel will rarely be seen as it is hidden by the 43” monitor that is mounted here but it makes us smile every time we do.  Simple and effective, these slots allow air to flow through them into the space behind where the Stbd side Air Handler lives and delivers either chilled air on AC or hot air in Heat mode to this side of the Salon.
    PXL_20210315_100359481While Ramazan putting in those slots, I lent a hand to work on mounting the Dinette table which is a job I have been longing to do for months now.

    This is the air assist pedestal and the XY slider setup from Zwaardvis that I have shown you below and now it was finally time to mount the table to it.
    PXL_20210315_100355136This ingenious bit of hardware allows us to move the table 200mm/8” fore/aft and side to side enabling us to always have the Goldilocks Just Right position for the table.
    PXL_20210315_101619415To reference the mounting I lowered the pedestal to put the table in “Bed” position and then moved the X and Y sliders underneath to allow movement in all 4 axis.
    PXL_20210315_093237791.MPI marked the slots on the feet of each slider with black pen as you can see here and I laid out two different positions; Passage Mode and Anchor Mode.
    PXL_20210315_093233959To allow me to move between these two modes I installed these threaded metal inserts which gives me metal M6 threads to fasten the table to the XY slider.
    Fun Fact:  I have had this set of threaded inserts for almost 40 years as I first used them when I was building bunk beds and other furniture before my 2 children were born!

    PXL_20210315_093230706I used a Forstner drill bit to carefully drill the flat bottom pilot holes and then you just install each metal insert with a hex socket to drive the external threads into the sides of the wooden holes.
    PXL_20210315_095429836Et Voila!  16 metal inserts with M6 threads in them all ready to accept the SS M6 bolts I will use to mount the table to the XY Slider and Pedestal.
    PXL_20210315_104526747.NIGHTYou can see how this works now and I have also mounted the Black handle that unlocks the table and allows you to slide it wherever you want it to be.
    PXL_20210315_104640588.MPHere is the final result, this being in Anchor Mode dinning table position. 
    From here you can move the table down and out in both directions to be in “Coffee Table” mode or all the way down into Bed mode or anywhere in between.


    PXL_20210315_113543142With so much more Commissioning work to be done I quickly covered it all in protective cardboard and painters tape for now. 
    As you can imagine, we can’t wait to remove all of these protective coverings throughout our beloved Möbius and convert from the current construction zone mode to Beautiful Living mode!

    Pole Dancing Anyone?

    PXL_20210315_141714494.MPNihat was back onboard for a bit this week and he installed what should be the last of the aluminium components on the SkyBridge which is this 40mm/1/5” AL pipe that does 2 important jobs; a wire chase to bring some of the cables for GPS and cameras mounted on the Roof down into the Upper Helm Station and …..
    PXL_20210315_141648515……. a hand hold when standing and walking up in the open area of the SkyBridge.

    But WAIT!!!

    There’s MORE!

    This adds a 3rd pole onboard for the Captain to use in her Yoga Pole Dancing routines!
    And that’s a wrap for this week and I need to get back to trouble shooting some of the gremlins that have been creeping up with our steering, throttle and CPP Pitch angle controls. 

    Thanks for taking the time to join in the journey and hope you’ll be back for more again next week.

    -Wayne









    It’s ALIVE!!!!! Mr. Gee’s Birthday, March 6, 2021 XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update March 1-6, 2021

    Möbius completed her second week afloat and I’m delighted to report that we ARE still floating and not a drop of seawater inside thank you very much!  Christine and I spend all day aboard working our way through the still growing punch list of jobs for us and Team Möbius from Naval Yachts to work on and we sleep aboard each night for safety’s sake as she is still so new and the probability of some surprise that could endanger the boat will be high for the first month or so until we get all the systems up and running and fully tested. 

    So our routine is to get up at our usual 06:30 or so, walk the dogs and drive back to our apartment to make breakfast, shower, etc. and then head back to the boat.  We do the same at the end of the work day here, whenever that ends up being and drive back to the apartment for dinner and then back to the boat for the night.  It is working out well as a good way for us to start to familiarize ourselves with the boat’s systems and be here to help out the rest of Team Möbius with all their tasks to complete the work remaining to fully finish this beautiful boat.  We have a few more things that need to be done before Möbius is fully seaworthy and safe to take out on her first sea trial run and if things go well we hope to do that this coming week so do be sure to join us here again next week to find out if that happened and how the first test run went.

    As with the previous blog posts over the past month or so, I will do my best to cover the large range of “little” jobs that have been done so this will be more of the “fly through” style Show & Tell, where I will let the photos do most of the talking and just add a few comments for context and understanding.

    AND ………….  there is a special Bonus Video hot off the press from Captain Christine which will fully explain the references in this week’s title so be sure to hang in to the end for that!

    If you haven’t done so already, grab a tasty beverage and a comfy seat and let’s dive right into this week’s Update.

    Sing it with me ….. Möbius is her Name-O…

    PXL_20210305_142531357.MPSome of you might recall seeing Mobius’ name and her Port of Registration in the Bailiwick of Jersey in black letters several months ago, but those were just temporary stick-on vinyl letters that were required to complete the registration paperwork in Jersey.  This week the CNC cut aluminium letters finally showed up and Orhan and Ali quickly had them adhered to the Aft Transom wall for Captain Christine’s approval. 

    These letters are made out of 10mm thick aluminium and we will paint their outer surface Black for better visibility a bit later.  But it was another one of those little things that makes her feel more and more like a “real boat” as we slowly get used to the idea that “Did we actually DO this?!!!”

    * For the sharp eyed curious types, the little item above the E in Jersey is the bracket for for the door latch on the WT door behind Christine.

    And the vertical gravestone looking item with the donut hole in it is a fair lead for bringing lines aboard from shore or other ships and up to the big Lewmar power winch on the Aft deck.


    PXL_20210304_132121166Orhan (Left) and Ali arranged the letters on the Aft Deck so we could decide on final spacing before the mounted them.  Each letter of the boat’s name must be a minimum of 150mm/ 6” high to meet the Registration requirements of Jersey and most other countries and these are 180mm high.
    PXL_20210304_135715344Wood strip to line up the bottoms of each letter and some painter’s tape to keep them in place overnight while the Grey Sikaflex cured.
    PXL_20210304_145008724Jersey lettering is required to be at least 100mm / 4” high and ours are 120 / 4.75” so they all easily meet the size requirements and still seem to be in good proportions with the size of the Transom and Swim Platform.
    PXL_20210305_061730095Ooops!  Can’t forget the umlaut as that is the proper spelling of the Möbius strip which is a big part of the whole story behind why we chose this name.  

    For anyone not familiar with them a Möbius strip is a surface with only one side was discovered by the German mathematician Augus Ferdinand Möbius and hence the spelling.  If you have not previously played with Strip or it has been awhile, then do yourself a favor and try making one for yourself (quick How-To HERE) and playing with this seemingly impossible surface as you cut it in half and other fun experiments.

    ** The sharp eyed amongst you might have also noticed when my left hand appears in some of the photos here, that the the wedding rings I designed and had cast from 3D printed wax models I made are also a Möbius Strip.  But that’s a whole post in itself so I’ll leave that for later.


    PXL_20210305_061655278And here is the end result.

    Sorry I didn’t get a better shot after removing the painter’s tape from the two umlauts but I’ll try for one next week with a shot of the whole Aft end of Möbius.


    *** For the curious, the winch handle on the Left is used to open the two dogs that keep the AL door into our HazMat locker very tight and fully watertight.


    Hinged Front Solar Panel Rack

    PXL_20210301_124646348Uğur finished installing these two hinged support posts that keep the front three 345W solar panels propped up when we are at anchor and want these panels to be horizontal or parallel to the waterline for best solar performance.

    PXL_20210301_124650081The other key reason for propping up these 3 Solar Panels on this hinged rack is to create the giant wind tunnel which captures even the slightest breezes coming over out bow when at anchor and funnels it through the large Black vertical mist eliminator grill you can see at the far end.  After having most of the salty humidity removed by the Mist Eliminator grills this fresh air then fills a large plenum box above the ceiling in the center of the SuperSalon and is controlled via 5 diffusers in the ceiling panel which provides eXtremely good fresh air flow throughout the SuperSalon.
    PXL_20210301_124722059In the raised position, the hinged posts fit into one of these Delrin sockets and are secured by the SS bolt.
    PXL_20210301_124733876The tops of the posts are captured in this bracket with another SS Allen head bolt providing the hinge pin.
    PXL_20210301_124755911When we want to get ready to head back out to see, or in high winds, we just lift the panel up a few inches and the ball ends of the posts can slide aft as they fold down with the hinged rack.
    PXL_20210301_062307823.MPAnother one of the “Big little jobs” that got going this week was making the last 3 wooden liners that wrap around the inside AL surfaces of the 10 glass covered hatches on Möbius.  Seven of these wood liners have been done for many months now as they are all made out of Ro$ewood and were done when the rest of the Rosewood interior was being made. 
    PXL_20210301_062314490.MPThese last three on the Aft Deck which bring lots of light and fresh air into my Workshop will be appropriately made from laminated marine wood and then painted White. 
    PXL_20210301_062336633Here you can see how these wood frames are a snug fit inside the 10mm thick AL frames of the hatches.
    PXL_20210302_075401790Once each liner had been fully test fitted they were taken back to the Naval shipyard to finish them which included the two small cut-outs you can see in this photo for where the latches for the hatch handles will go.
    PXL_20210301_115740408The top edge of these wooden liners need help create the groove and support surface for the edge seals that ring each hatch and make them completely watertight no matter what Mother Nature and Mother Ocean throw at us, so they were cut and fitted as part of the hatch installation.
    Trim-Lok Hatch Seal Builder snipTrim-Lok is a very cool company that discovered after LOTS of research for the Goldilocks hatch seals.  Trim-Lok was great to work with via their excellent web site which allows you to design your own edge seals using their “Hatch Seal Product Builder” site so last year I had designed these edge seals as part of my overall design of the hatches themselves.
    PXL_20210301_123452853 You can see how these edge seals have two connected parts to them, the U shaped rubber channel pointing to the Right here is lined with aluminium U-shaped “staples” which allow the edge to stay flexible as it wraps around the tight corner radius at each corner of the Hatch Frame and still grips the 10mm AL edge.  The upper part on the Left here is the “bulb”, a hollow tube of EPDM rubber that provides the “squish” and the actual seal against the underside of the hatch lid and keeps all the water outside where it belongs.
    PXL_20210301_105007640This is one of the Rosewood liners that goes into the Guest Shower, if you will please pardon the mess of construction debris, you can see how the top edge of the wood liners form both the inner groove where the edge seal fits over the AL frame and how the flat top surfaces of both the AL frame and the wood liner provide a very solid surface for the bottom of the EPDM bulb to be sandwiched and squished tight when the top of the bulb is pushed down by the closed hatch lid.
    PXL_20210301_123425773Here is a closer shot during one of the test fittings so you can see how these seals work.

    This attention to such details and my decision to design my own hatches is all part of my overall obsession about keeping all the water on the OUTSIDE of the boat!  Our past experiences and that of most other sailors, has taught us that hatches are one of the prime culprits and most annoying of leaks on a boat so we set out to build some Goldilocks Just Right hatches that establish a strong fully watertight seal when closed and will stay that way for at least the next 10 years. 
    *** Check back in with me here in 2031 for an update on how well these worked.  For now though we are delighted with how well our hatches have turned out and in the coming week or so I will be able to show you the final step; mounting the custom designed hatch handles and latches.


    STEERING our Course to Freedom
    PXL_20210225_140913191.MP

    We left off last week with the beginning of the installation of the emergency manual steering wheel in the Main Helm and we finished that this week.  We regard this as an “emergency” or backup steering system as we have several layers of fault tolerance designed into our primary Kobelt steering system with dual redundant double acting hydraulic steering cylinders and dual redundant Accu-Steer HPU 400 24 volt hydraulic steering pumps.
    PXL_20210225_140924574

    A the very bottom here, you can see how the SS adaptor we machined bolts to the Vetus steering wheel and then slides over the SS shaft coming out of the Bronze Kobelt 7012 manual hydraulic steering pump above. 

    The majority of the time this wheel will be taken off and stored somewhere nearby the Helm by simply loosening those two SS machine screws that clamp the wheel adaptor to the pump shaft.
    PXL_20210301_062809875.MPThe elbow coming out of the top of the pump goes over to a 1 liter AL header tank we fabricated here and is mounted inside the triangular upper storage area on the Stbd/Right side of the Main Helm and keeps a steady “head” of hydraulic oil to feed this pump.
    PXL_20210301_062814138When you turn the steering wheel the pump forces hydraulic oil out one of the two valves on the rear of the pump where you see the two red handled ball valves here, and those hoses go all the way back to the cylinders attached through the Tiler Arm to the Rudder Shaft and the boat turns.
    PXL_20210217_090620686Way back in the Workshop we have been setting up and commissioning the two Accu-Steer HPU400 pumps, also owned by Kobelt, and this is a shot looking straight down at the Blue anodized AL manifold housing of the Stbd side HPU400.  These are 2Speed pumps so the two silver cylinders in the middle here are where you adjust the High/Low Speeds but this is rarely needs any adjustment.

    We have custom designed this whole steering system with Lance Lidstone and Keivan Ashouei and they have continued to provide us with outstanding support and assistance throughout the installation and now the setting up and commissioning of our whole steering system.


    FYI, at maximum conditions these pumps are set to put out 1000 PSI of hydraulic pressure that gives us much more than we need under even the most severe scenarios.  Just the way we like it and have designed all the systems onboard Möbius.


    PXL_20210303_034253211Keivan has been especially helpful via WhatsApp video calls at very early Am times for him and late PM for me.  when we had a few problems with the initial settings on some of the control valves which one of the installers on this end had changed from the factory pre-set positions without me knowing but it was an easy fix once we identified it. 

    We also had a bit of a setback when one of our more “burly” installers got a bit too aggressive when tightening down the SS bleeder screws, one of which you can see at the top of this cylinder.
    PXL_20210303_151839497These bleeder screws push a small SS check ball down against a seat machined as a chamfer in the brass end caps and if you don’t follow the Kobelt Installation Instructions (harrumph, harrumph!) and overtighten the bleeders more than the maximum 5 ft.lbs torque, they score a groove into the SS check ball as you can on this one.

    Difficult to photograph but if you look closely and click to enlarge this photo (works on all photos in all blog Post s BTW) you will be able to see the groove cut into this SS check ball by the SS bleeder screw.


    But as luck would have it and with the help of our “Turkish Fixer” Alaaddin, we were able to find a ball bearing that had the exact same 3.8mm diameter steel balls in it and by cutting this bearing open was able to end up with 7 brand new SS check balls!


    PXL_20210303_151503051To make matters much worse though, this excess force  and force the SS ball into the soft brass seat damaging it as well.  Easy to tell when this happens as the bleeder screw now leaks!  Even more difficult to photograph this but if you enlarge and look closely at the bottom of this threaded port for the bleeder screw, you will see how you can badly deformed the brass seat is here.
    PXL_20210304_163317469The solution I came up with was to remove the brass end caps as you see me doing here and then try to make a little tool that would cut a new seat in the brass and put it back to the original 118 degree angled chamfer.  I was too busy making this custom tool bit and machining the new seat to take any photos but the good news is that it all seemed to work well and I was able to machine new seats on all four end caps.


    PXL_20210305_120952128Tune in next week to find out if this all really does work when we reassemble all the cylinders and put all 1000 PSI into them and see if we have any leaks.

    Wish us luck!
    PXL_20210303_113823141One of the other BIG little jobs that Ramazan checked off this past week was the installation of our 10 different fire extinguishers that are spread throughout the whole boat.  We have doubled up on these as well with the one of the Right here being the traditional style most of you would be familiar with.
    PXL_20210303_113811666Then we have doubled up with these rather new and totally awemazing fire extinguishers from Maus in Sweden.  If you have not heard of these before please do check out the link above to the UK Maus site which has some very compelling video sequences showing how and how well these puppies work!


    Maus STIXX stripsIn particular check out the newest Maus STIXX “fire suppression Stickers” that will be going into each of our electrical panels as soon as we can get them delivered to us here in Turkey.

    And don’t just take my word for it, also check out John Harries excellent article on these Maus fire extinguishers in his incredibly valuable “Attainable Adventures” web site HERE.


    It’s ALIVE!!!

    OK, I’ve saved THE BEST for last this week and hope you too will find it worth the wait.  This is of course the reference to this week’s title and have you already guessed what this is all about?

    NO!  It is not in reference to the fact that Captain Christine says I bear a certain resemblance to Gene Wilder in this infamous scene from the fun movie Young Frankenstein.
    It's ALIVE Gene Wilder GIF

    PXL_20210302_071919501Will this clue help you guess?

    Hint; you are looking at the two high amp 24V cables going into Mr. Gee’s starter.
    PXL_20210306_140009745.MPHow about this clue?

    Yes, that is Mr. Gee’s engine coolant water temperature gauge.

    Hint: check out the temperature even if it is a bit blurry.
    Obvious right??!!!!!

    Ahhhh, heck, why don’t you just watch the fun even by playing the short little video clip below that Christine just finished putting together as that will be MUCH better than my belaboured and boring explanation.

    Click PLAY below and enjoy!




    That’s right!  He’s ALIVE!!!!!!!

    After a gestation period of almost 5 years and a LOT of work along the way to fully restore this 1971 Gardner 6LXB marine engine to his original if not better than factory new condition, Mr. Gee has been “reborn” and his newest “Birth Day” is now March 6th, 2021.

    It all went down just as you see in the video above.  After topping Mr. Gee up with fresh water, oil, diesel fuel, saltwater cooling heat exchangers and priming his fuel injection system, he lit up on first crank, first time!  I’m not even going to start telling you more as I won’t be able to stop myself from going on and on and on, even more than I usually do if that is within the realm of believability.  Instead I’ll just let you enjoy the video as I go join my Beautiful Bride and Captain Christine as we enjoy this MAJOR Milestone for us and we toast Mr. Gee’s Birth Day and wish that he will start up first time every time during his next lifetime and ours.

    -Wayne

    The Aqueous Phase of the Build – XPM78-01 Möbius 22-27 Feb, 2021

    A VERY busy week here onboard the Good Ship Möbius as everyone on Team Möbius moves into the final stage of the build completing all the installations of equipment and beginning the commissioning of all these systems by their factory representatives and others.  Due to a major reconstruction project of the harbour inside the Free Zone * which removed all the previous launching facilities, Naval needed to launch us quite a bit sooner than expected by transporting Möbius overland to the nearby Setur Marina.  So in addition to the usual post launch commissioning of systems, we all continue to work our way through the Punch List of jobs needing to be completed in order to get Möbius into seaworthy condition to begin taking her out for sea trials.  To say that we are all eXtremely busy would be the understatement of the year!  But. for Christine and me, we are even more eXtremely eXcited to be back where we belong, home onboard a boat that floats.

    * You can learn all about this huge and fascinating project by watching THIS VIDEO ANIMATION which does a great job of showing how the whole new harbour facility will work.

    I hope you will accept my apologies in advance for another hurried weekly Möbius Update as I blast through as much of all the different jobs that we have all worked on this past week.  So grab your favorite beverage and chair and join me for this week’s Show & Tell.

    Let me start with a quick snapshot leading up to this adventure that began over 5 years ago.


    Mobius front Stbd render

    After two years of intense collaborative design work with our AbFab Naval Architect Dennis at Artnautica Yacht Design, the building of XPM78-01 Möbius began at Naval Yachts on April 6, 2018. 
    Launching Stbd side from Dincer1053 days of build time later, as most of you have likely seen in last week’s posting HERE, she finally left that temporary womb last Friday for a watery delivery into her permanent home with Mother Ocean last Saturday. 
    PXL_20210222_081251718As I write this blog post from the SkyBridge of our beloved Möbius, we have just finished our first week afloat tied up to the concrete dock wall inside the Antalya Free Zone Harbour. 

    And I am VERY happy, though not surprised, to report that ALL the sea water has remained where it belongs OUTSIDE of Möbius and our bilges only hold the remnants of construction dust and debris.

    DOCKSIDE NEIGHBORS

    PXL_20210222_081426614

    Looking all the world to me like two tugs that escaped from a children’s animation story, these two almost new tugs are our most immediate neighbors.
    PXL_20210223_125007789.MPTied up less than a meter in front of Möbius’ Bow.
    PXL_20210227_065047889

    These two tugs have crew aboard 24/7 as they are responsible for bringing every cargo ship into and out of the commercial side of the Harbour such as this recent little visitor, the 180m 36k Ton Argo B, who left about 04:30 this morning after loading up with several thousand “Big Bags” of industrial dry goods.
    PXL_20210225_063350261These two tugs are also the Fire Boats for the Harbour.  And last night, they surprised and delighted us by bringing over a home made pizza just out of their oven!  Can’t think of a better example of why we LOVE living with these awemazing people of Turkey.
    PXL_20210222_084755831.MPTied up almost as closely to our Stern is this first of four Police boats which are being built by Ares Yachts here in the Free Zone for the government of Oman.  These are a bit longer than us at about 26m but share many of the same basic attributes as our XPM-78 with all aluminum construction and built like the proverbial tank.
    PXL_20210225_064345248We even have the same jet propulsion system though in our case just with our Tender and a single not these massive twin jet drives driven by two equally massive MAN diesel engines.
    PXL_20210226_102842036One item that we do not share, YET! with these boats is that mount for a 50 cal machine gun.  But rest assured that once I get my 3D printer setup one of my first projects will be to create a realistic enough looking plastic replica to produce a silhouette that will add to our “don’t mess with me!” look to any onlookers thinking of approaching us with mal intent!
    PXL_20210228_064153289I took this shot of our neighborhood early this morning after the Argo B had left and the tugs were back in front of us.  The weather has been truly spectacular for the past two weeks with daytime highs reaching 24C/77F and gloriously sunny clear blue skies with very little wind.  Not a bad place to spend our first week afloat.

    For safety of such a new and incomplete boat, Christine and I are sleeping aboard each night and then going back to our apartment for breakfast and dinner and then we will move aboard full time once all the sea trials are done.

    ANCHOR AWEIGH!

    Bow render w anchor no railsOne of the projects I did not have enough time to show you last week was the completion of our rather unique “Sidewinder” anchor roller assembly that Dennis and I came up with so let me show that to you now.
    150 Anchor Roller dim dwg v3I decided to make the two anchor rollers out of solid aluminium and didn’t take me long to design a 3D model of this in Autodesk Fusion 360 and create the 2D dimensioned drawings to machine them from.
    PXL_20210210_133511164Aluminium is a dream to work with and the in house machine shop has a very good sized lathe that was easily able to machine the two anchor rollers out of a single blank of 200mm/8” OD aluminium round stock.
    PXL_20210215_101708879I wanted to keep the anchor and the chain electrically isolated from the hull to reduce any corrosion problems and was able to do so with two details.  One is this Black Delrin bushing which we press fit into each roller with a nice rolling fit for the 40mm/1.6” SS pin that each roller spins on.
    PXL_20210215_101554236The second isolating detail was to machine these Teflon discs that get separate the sides of the rollers from the inside cheeks of the anchor roller assembly welded into the hull.  Then a large SS end cap bolts on either end of the SS pin on the outside.
    PXL_20210217_111230847Here is what that all looks like when assembled.
    PXL_20210216_121707878For safety and quiet when pounding into big seas we very specifically designed the whole roller assembly to exactly match the shape of this 125kg/275lb Rocna anchor by obtaining a 3D model from Rocna to design with.  The way our design works is that those flared out bottom edges you see in the photo above have been designed such that they exactly match up with the inside of the flukes of the Rocna when pulled aboard and thus the Rocna becomes one with the hull and will not budge no matter what Mother Nature throws at us.  This creates not only a very tough and strong anchor mounting setup but also one that does not make any noise due to movement between the anchor and the roller assembly which is so common on many other boats we have run.
    PXL_20210217_111212651So Nihat, Uğur and I spent quite a few hours with the anchor raised on a chain block that allowed us to get the position of the anchor just right and then layout the centers for each SS roller pin.  Front pin and roller have been mounted here and we are laying out the location for the 2nd Aft roller.
    PXL_20210217_112203638Uğur and I came up with this idea of building an extended 40mm carbide hole saw so that he could drill both cheeks in one go and keep the two holes for the SS roller pin on the same centerline.  We lucked out finding the head of a 40mm carbide hole saw with its shank broken off and Uğur TIG welded a 200mm/8” long piece of 13mm/ 1/2” OD rod to it that we could chuck in my Milwaukee drill.  Worked like a charm!
    PXL_20210217_134123280.MPWith the rollers both installed we tested it all out with the 13mm / 1/2” chain and the Maxwell VWC4000 Windlass and did a bit of tweaking of the rollers final shape to capture the chain nicely so it stays aligned as the chain goes Out/In and doesn’t twist. 
    PXL_20210218_130220400Did not take us long to get to the Goldilocks Just Right point
    PXL_20210219_063440982.MPand “Rocky” was in his new home as solid as his name.
    PXL_20210217_151007235.MPUğur and Nihat both gave it their thumbs up and so we knew it was good to go!

    BOTTOMS UP!

    Another job and details I did not have time to post last week prior to the launch was the finishing of the silicone based International InterSleek 1100SR Foul Release bottom paint and the zinc anodes so let me go back and show you that.

    PXL_20210215_101207324Once the super slick, slippery and shiny silicone InterSleek was fully dry the last few underwater details could be attended to such as mounting the Red plastic prop on the Vetus 220kgf 300mm/12” Extended Run Time Bow Thruster.
    PXL_20210215_101145530Which is capped off with its own Zinc to reduce any problems with corrosion due to the mix of dissimilar metals involved with its construction of Bronze, SS and AL.
    PXL_20210216_111830409.MPIn keeping with our Darth Vader, lean & mean look, we decided to make the 100mm/4” Boot Stripe that makes the transition between the top of the Black InterSleek and the bare AL hull, be gloss Black as well and we are eXtremely happy with the result that emerged as the masking tape came off to reveal the final look.
    PXL_20210216_121054898The final detail for the underwater portion of the hull was mounting the ten 125mm / 5” diameter Zinc anodes which keeps all the metal bits that are in contact with seawater all at the same potential voltage and eliminates the battery effect that would eat away at our precious Stainless Steel, AL and Bronze components. 
    PXL_20210216_121611273Being near the bottom of the Noble scale of metals, Zinc is what will erode instead and makes it easy to replace the zincs every few years when they get too worn away.
    PXL_20210216_121418621.MPWe designed a very simple mounting system for the Zincs and Uğur had previously welded 80mm discs of 20mm / 3/4” thick AL to the hull with an M16 thread in the center for the SS M16 bolt that he is fastening this Zinc on the Rudder with.
    PXL_20210219_063321360To ensure a good electrical connection for many years between the Zinc and the AL mounting disc, we coated those surfaces and the bolt with dielectric grease and then I followed along after Uğur and covered the SS bolt heads with some clear silicone to make it all the easier to remove and replace these zincs in a couple of years.  I usually do this while the boat is in the water using my Hookah or Snuba system so these little details all help to make that job go quick and easy.
    PXL_20210219_063354149With all these preparations of the below the waterline areas of the hull and everything removed from underneath, Möbius was ready for the arrival of “Big Bird” the yellow 72 wheel boat mover to arrive the next morning and carry her overland to the marina for launching.

    TILLER ARM DETAILS:


    Tiller Arm w cylindersAnother few details that we needed to look after before Launch Day were for the all important steering system and the Tiller Arm in particular.  Similar to the Bow Rollers, last year I had designed this typically over engineered Tiller Arm in Fusion 360 and had it CNC milled out of a single block of aluminum.
    Tiller Arm being fittedHere is a shot from almost a year ago when we first mounted the finished Tiller Arm to the 127mm / 5” OD solid AL Rudder Post.
    PXL_20210118_151755877And here is a more recent shot of what it looks like with the two double acting Kobelt hydraulic steering cylinders in place.
    PXL_20210215_143337875Such a massive Tiller Arm being powered by equally as beefy twin hydraulic cylinders, produces a LOT of force and so there needs to be some eXtremely strong and solid Tiller Arm Stops built in to stop the Tiller Arm when it goes hard over to each side.  Fusion 360 to the rescue yet again to help me quickly design these Stops which Uğur and Nihat quickly fabricated and were ready to mount.
    PXL_20210215_153108831After carefully testing out the Just Right position for each stop, they were able to drill the four holes in the AL Rudder Shelf and bolt down one Stop in either side of the Tiller Arm body.  The SS bolt and lock nut allow us to adjust the final Stop position of the Tiller Arm once we are in the water and have the steering all working.
    PXL_20210118_134133102I like to practice and live well by what I call “Readiness for the UneXpected” and in the case of our steering system that meant having multiple layers of fault tolerance for the Steering System.  This starts with twin independent Kobelt 7080 hydraulic steering cylinders sized so that either one can fully steer the boat in the most adverse sea conditions.

    Then two independent Kobelt Accu-Steer HPU400 24V hydraulic Power Pack pumps, two independent Furuno 711C AutoPilots plus two independent Furuno Jog Levers.  This gives us eight levels of fault tolerance to go through.



    PXL_20210226_121100138And if ALL of that should uneXpectedly fail, then we have this Kobelt manual hydraulic Steering Pump ……………
    PXL_20210225_140913191.MP ……….. that we can slide this Emergency Steering wheel onto and steer the boat the “old fashioned” way.
    PXL_20210121_080012586.MPAnd if ALL of that should somehow uneXpectedly fail we have THIS final layer of fault tolerance for our steering system; a completely independent and manual Emergency Tiller Arm.
    PXL_20210118_134143252Can’t get too much more KISSS or Keep It Simple Smart & Safe than this; a 2m/6.5ft length of 80mm thick walled AL pipe that slides through the 20mm/ 3/4” thick plate we see Uğur bolting to the Tiller Arm body and then the pipe slides through a matching hole bored through the top of the Rudder Post. 
    PXL_20210121_080012586.MPWe attach a block and tackle setup on each side of the end of the Emergency Tiller which fasten to shackles mounted on stringers on the adjacent hull sides which allows us to move and lock the Rudder in any position we want.

    Yes, I do know that it works and Yes, you can ask me how I know that!

    Miscellaneous Work on Deck

    Finishing up this blog post is between me and another very late dinner so I’m going to speed through a series of other jobs that got done this first week in the water.
    PXL_20210215_131834473Turkish Turquoise Marble countertops got installed atop both Vent Boxes on the Aft Deck to create our Outdoor Galley.
    PXL_20210215_131519658.MPSS sink plumbed.
    PXL_20210215_085612478And installed in the Starboard/Right side Vent Box.
    PXL_20210215_131927886Plumbing connections all ready to connect to the sink; Red & Blue PEX lines with shut off valves for the Hot/Cold water to the sink faucet, Brass elbow for the sink’s drain and small Blue tube with the Black elbow to drain the water extracted by the Mist Eliminator grills in the Engine Room supply air duct.
    PXL_20210216_105438835.MPOrhan with his home made adaptor for his pneumatic caulking gun ……..
    PXL_20210216_122129530…….  to get into some hard to reach spots around the Pilot House windows like these.
    PXL_20210218_134142509Uğur prepping the nylon insert mounts for the Passarella on the Swim Platform and another on the Port side gate.
    PXL_20210226_122256916Ever the ingenious one on Team ,Uğur came up with this brilliant DIY solution for mounting our Fire Hose in the HazMat Locker; an empty plastic spool of MIG welder wire!

    PXL_20210226_122310591Which will rotate on this pipe mounted on the side of the HazMat Locker.
    PXL_20210227_133714661With the Black Fire Nozzle mounted alongside.  Any wonder why I just love working with this guy who has been with us from the very first day of the build?!!!
    PXL_20210227_110021249More Uğur Goodness, on Saturday no less, as we designed and built this simple setup for propping the front 3 Solar Panels mounted on this hinged frame up in the horizontal position when we are on anchor.

    This horizontal position not only helps out with solar power production but you can see the demister grill across the far end of what now becomes a giant wind tunnel to capture all the fresh breezes blowing over our bow at anchor and funnel them down into the SuperSalon.
    PXL_20210227_105959889Two SS pipes that are hinged to the bottom of the Solar Panel frame and will fit into these Black Delrin collars Uğur machined which were then glued down to the aluminium floor with a SS set screw to lock them in place.

    When we are ready to convert to passage making mode and head out to sea, you simply lift the panels up a few inches and the two support rods slide aft as the panel is lowered down and locked into place.

    ELECTRIAL WORKS:

    Our Sparkie Hilmi always has a long list of electrical jobs that need his attention and this past week was certainly no exception.  With almost 150 circuit breakers on XPM78-01 Möbius to safely look after all our 12 & 24 Volt DC circuits and our all our 120V & 240V AC circuits, it was quite the design challenge to figure out where and how to place all these.

    PXL_20210226_085403482We ended up with two primary circuit breaker panels; this one on the angled short wall on the Stbd/Right side of the Main Helm Station.
    PXL_20210226_085300787.PORTRAITAnd this larger one in the Corridor at the bottom of the stairs leading down from the SuperSalon to the Guest Cabin, Ships Office and Workshop/Engine Room.
    PXL_20210226_085119437After months and months of preparation, Hilmi was finally able to bring it all together this past week by attaching these Black AL panel fronts with all the engraved labels onto the hinged access doors into each of these Circuit Breaker panels.

    Next week the hinged glass doors are due to arrive which will finish off these critical component of the electrical system on Möbius.

    GLASS WORK

    PXL_20210224_133202907.MPThe double paned 16mm thick glass window finally got installed in the Engine Room door this week which is a critical component to completely closing in the Engine Room in the case of a fire.
    PXL_20210224_083947825.MPAnd the gas lift cylinders have now all been installed on the Glass Deck Hatches which I designed and Naval built in house.  Now just need to finish installing the rubber edge seals and the AL hatch handles and the deck is totally watertight!

    HELM STATIONS:

    PXL_20210217_125040209I can’t possibly do justice to explain the amount of work that Christine has done this past week alone on getting all our navigation and electronics in both Helm Stations all setup and working. 

    Nor can I articulate how much I LOVE my Captain!
    PXL_20210228_064153289What I can do though is to leave you with this shot from early this morning that does capture for me just how well we have succeeded in designing and building our new home with all of Team Möbius to meet the goal we set out over 5 years ago to blend in perfectly when in a commercial dock as apposed to a ‘yachty’ marina.
    And with that I am going to hit the “Publish” button on this latest Möbius Weekly Progress Update and look forward to bringing you more Show & Tell of this coming week’s progress that begins first thing tomorrow morning.

    But WAIT!!!

    There’s MORE!!!!!

    One year ago, Christine and I returned from a brief trip over to the UK for her Birthday (March 15th) just as the whole Corona 19 pandemic was ramping up and caught us squarely in the vortex.  Given our ages, let’s just say rapidly approaching 70, every day since we have been playing a kind of Russian Roulette by going into the shipyard to work on Möbius and so we are eXtremely eXcited that tomorrow morning at 11am we are going to get our Covid 19 vaccine shots!

    Of course, this doesn’t put an end to anything really but sure will help with our upcoming travel plans, for which we shall be eternally grateful to this country we have called home for almost four years now and that love a wee bit more every day.  Thank you Turkey for allowing these two salt water turkies to enjoy your beautiful country and people!

    -Wayne


    Our Bottom is all Slippery Sleek Silicone Goodness! XPM78-01 Möbius Feb 8-13, 2021 Progress Update

    First and most importantly, let me send out a big Happy Valentine’s Day wish to all of you.  I hope that you and those you love treat yourselves to an extra special Valentine’s Day Sunday.  Christine and I have done our best to do the same though our Valentine Möbius seemed to get the majority of the TLC and attention as you’ll see below.

    Before I begin this week’s Progress Update, a brief story (I promise!) that sums up our lives right now.

    When I was about 8 years old, my never ending curiosity lead me to read about one of Zeno’s paradoxes that completely dumbfounded me and led to many sleepless nights trying to wrap my head around it.  That paradox has been haunting me again as we get closer and closer to finishing and launching XPM78-01 Möbius so I thought you might enjoy the story.  I suspect many of you know this particular paradox often referred to as Zeno’s Paradox of the Tortoise and Achilles and you too might have also found it undeniably true but equally hard to accept at first.  My eight year old self read it as a simple question;

    If you want to get from Point A to Point B and each step you take is exactly 1/2 the distance between you and Point B, how many steps will it take you to get there? 

    Answer? 

    An infinite number of steps and you will never get all the way there!  Think about it, you’ll see the paradox.

    Ahhh, I see those smiles and nods of recognition and you already know why I feel like I am living that paradox every day!  Step after step, progress being made as we inch closer and closer but it feels like we’ll never get there.  We WILL of course and you can read all about various “solutions” or different takes on this paradox but it does nicely sum up how Christine and I are feeling at this point.

    More to the point that YOU care about and why you are reading, let’s jump into this week’s Show & Tell of the many half steps that Team Möbius DID make this past week of Feb. 8-13, 2021 and did move us closer to the finish line.  And my apologies in advance for likely rushing you through this week’s Show & Tell, but it has been a very long week and it is now late Sunday evening as I’m typing this up and my vivacious Valentine awaits as does our dinner so I hope you will pardon the rush job this week.

    Silicone based Foul Release Bottom Paint

    If you were not able to catch up to last week’s Progress Update post “The Captain & Mr. Gee get CRANKY!” it may help to go read that over before continuing as we picked up where we left off last week wtih the preparation for the application of the International InterSleek 1100SR Foul Release paint that will cover all the underwater aluminium surfaces and keep them clean and slick by not allowing any marine growth to stick. 

    PXL_20210208_112600152By the end of last week, we left the bottom paint crew having finished applying all the coats of International Epoxy Primer to the freshly sanded bare AL hull surfaces and masking off the 100mm / 4” wide glossy Black Boot Strip that makes the transition between the top of the Black InterSleek and the bare aluminium hull sides above the WL.
    PXL_20210208_112608421With the top and bottom edges of this Boot Stripe all taped off with Blue Painter’s Tape, they did a quick sand of the areas that would be sprayed with the glossy Black International Perfection polyurethane paint.
    PXL_20210209_093735862.MPIt was just before 18:30 quitting time when they got to the quick and easy part of spraying on several coats of the Black Boot Stripe.  It is getting lighter here as the days get longer but still needed the help of an LED work lamp to do the spraying.
    PXL_20210210_092107160They let that dry for 24 hours and then masked it off for the big job coming next; applying the InterSleek 737 “Pink” primer coats and then the Black InterSleek final coats.
    PXL_20210210_092302634For the application of the InterSleek primer and topcoats, Naval called in the Big Guns from neighboring industrial boat builder Damen as they have a whole team of people who do nothing but InterSleek on the bottoms of the many big ships that they build and launch each year. 
    PXL_20210210_092308514Given its thick consistency, InterSleek requires the use of airless spray equipment so they wheeled this bad boy over under Möbius and we brought out all the cans of InterSleek 737 Pink which is a three part A+B+C mix.
    PXL_20210210_101524098.MPIlyas is the Manager of Damen’s InterSleek team and started mixing this 3 part mix of 737 primer.
    PXL_20210210_105644786.MPAs per its name, an airless sprayer does not use compressed air to atomize liquid finishes out the end of a spray gun.  Instead it uses hydraulic principles to push liquid paint directly from a big intake pipe set into the can of 737 Pink you see here and then out a spray gun nozzle at the other end.  That big black round cylinder at the top of the airless sprayer seen here wrapped in protective plastic, is a giant rubber diaphragm that pumps up and down and pumps the liquid paint out the thing black hose you can see exiting the photo on the far Right edge by the blue pail.
    PXL_20210211_075627520.MPThis is the actual spray gun at the other end of that black hose where the highly pressurized paint flows out the small nozzle on the upper Right and ……..
    PXL_20210210_105715884.MP…….. onto the hull like this.


    PXL_20210210_105659644.MPAs a former Automotive and Autobody teacher and antique car/motorcycle restorer, I have done my fair share of traditional spray painting but this airless spraying is more like using a very well controlled fire hose!
    PXL_20210210_111242641Möbius is 24m / 78 feet long on each side and yet
    PXL_20210211_064820956…. it took Ilyas less than 15 minutes to spray on two thick coats on all that area!
    PXL_20210210_123424936And that included details such as the Rudder and prop shaft Skeg, and …..
    PXL_20210210_123532937…… the Bow Thruster Tunnel.
    PXL_20210211_075559515The 737 Pink primer was allowed to set up for 24 hours and then it was time for …….
    PXL_20210211_105524745…….. the final 3 topcoats of the Black silicone based InterSleek 1100 SR which is also a 3 part mix.  All mixed up and ready to be hydraulically pumped to that big spray gun in Ilyas’ hand.
    PXL_20210211_112117377While Ilyas suited up his team mates were busy rolling the Black InterSleek 1100 on all the edges of things like the Rudder and CPP Prop Skeg.
    PXL_20210211_112133892Depth and sonar transducers……
    PXL_20210211_112140333….. and deep up inside all the 5 Sea Chest tubes.
    PXL_20210211_112427662InterSleek 1100SR all mixed up and suction pipe set inside so it is all systems GO!
    PXL_20210211_112151546.MPDifficult to capture with the camera amongst all the fumes but that gun blasts out a cone of paint that is about 1m / 39” wide
    PXL_20210211_114034525And so once again Ilyas had the first coats of Black InterSleek all sprayed on in under 15 minutes!
    PXL_20210211_114121036It is a fascinating product which looks very wet even when it is fully dry 24 hours later and to the touch it feels “sticky” and it remains that way throughout its 5-8 year expected life.  You know this feeling if you have ever handled soft silicone cooking mats or the like as that is just what is now covering all of Möbius’ bottom.  Go ahead and try to stick to that you little marine munchkins!
    PXL_20210212_134412947A second coat was applied the next day and once that had dried it was time to reposition all the support stands so that the area underneath them could also receive the full silicone InterSleek treatment.
    PXL_20210212_134453066Uğur was masterful at this tricky task as he positioned a new steel stand to one side of the existing ones and then hammered in new wood wedges to take up the weight of the boat enough to remove the wedges on the other stand and take it out.

    And you can see what I mean about this InterSleek stuff being slick!
    PXL_20210212_134430757With the old wedges and stand out of the way we reveal these bare AL patches whose turn it is now to get the full epoxy primer and InterSleek treatment.
    PXL_20210212_151510356These patches are carefully taped off with some special “super tape” that can manage to stick to silicone and then a roller can be used to apply the epoxy primer coats like this.
    PXL_20210213_065846684.MPAnd this.
    PXL_20210213_134050998Once the epoxy primer coats were fully dry, the 737 Pink silicone primer was rolled on next. 

    BTW, you can see that special tape quite well here.
    PXL_20210214_113347419.MPFinally, the last 2 coats of Black InterSleek are rolled on and our bottom is done! 

    The Black discs you see like this one are 25mm / 1” thick AL mounting pads with a blind threaded hole where a circular Zinc anode will eventually be attached before launch.
    PXL_20210213_065736002.MPThis is how the very aft end of the hull will look for its underwater portion.

    Painting the Nogva CPP Propeller


    We got mixed reviews and recommendations for using the same InterSleek 1100SR to keep the CPP propeller equally as clean and slick as the rest of the hull so we opted to go with a single purpose silicone paint propeller paint called “PellerClean” which the Japanese company SeaJet created.  If you would like to know more about this product and how to apply it, Matt over on the “MJ Sailing” YouTube channel that he and Jessica maintain so well, has THIS full video on their application of PellerClean on their prop last year.  If you are not already subscribed to Matt and Jessica’s MJ Sailing channel we can recommend it highly as it is one of our many favorites for great boat related content.

    PXL_20210212_092737232This propeller treatment wasn’t covered by our agreement with Naval Yachts so Christine and I looked after this application.  Do I really need to answer the question about why I am so madly in love with my Valentine and perfect partner for my very imperfect self?!?
    PXL_20210212_100551588.MPThe application of these very specialized silicone paint systems is very exacting so we followed them to the letter and prepped all the bronze with a 80 grit wheel to give the upcoming PellerClean Primer a good bit of “bite”.
    PXL_20210212_104528251The 2 part yellow coloured PellerClean comes in premeasured cans which you simply stir together well for about 5 minutes and then brush on.
    PXL_20210212_110903745It is very thick with a consistency similar to mayonnaise so it is a bit challenging to get all the brush marks out in the first coat.
    PXL_20210212_110931383But with each of the successive 3 coats we were able to get it well evenly applied and then let dry for 24 hours.
    PXL_20210212_145340315The clear topcoats go on next and curiously these are a single part product and after my experience with it I suspect it is pretty much pure silicone.
    PXL_20210212_151442537Another late night at the yard for us so this is all shot in the dark with just the LED work lights which really skew the phot colors so it looks very greenish here whereas the real colour is closer to a bronzy yellow but the more important part is that this is goes on smooth and slick!
    PXL_20210213_065730622.MPI finished the 2nd coat of clear PellerClean yesterday and I’ll see what it looks like in the morning and decide whether to add a final 3rd coat.

    It was not cheap but a clean propeller and bottom makes SUCH a difference in terms of boat speed and amount of power it takes to propel the boat through the water.  This was very evident to us on our previous 52 foot sailboat and so now with our XPM power boat, these super slick easy to keep clean surfaces will make a huge difference in our fuel economy and increase our speed through the water.  Stay tuned for those data points once we launch and start logging real world measurements.

    More “Big Little Jobs” this past week:

    Apologies in advance again for blasting through this but thought you would enjoy seeing some of the “little jobs” that add up to Big things which got done this past week.


    PXL_20210210_113853962.MPOur Super Sewer Sinan, whipped up this “skirt” that wraps around the round Anchor Chain Bin and seals the top to the Hawse Pipe where the Chain comes In/Out and keeps all the muck and mud from the anchor chain, inside the Chain Bin where it is easily rinsed out through the drain in the bottom.
    PXL_20210210_113920584I had originally thought about having Sinan put in a clear plastic window so we could see inside the Chain Bin to see how the chain was moving In/Out but instead we went with this KISSS Velcro slit which you can open up anytime and peer inside.
    PXL_20210210_113928698Sinan attached the Skirt to the outside of the top of the Chain Bin with snap fasteners so it is also quick and easy to do the Full Monty and take the whole skirt off (but you can keep your hat on!)
    PXL_20210212_112358237The cylindrical tops of these Tiller Rudder Stops were back from the machine shop with their M16 threads for the SS bolt and locking nut that provide adjustment so Uğur was able to finish welding these up and we will show you them being mounted next week.
    PXL_20210212_135937851.MPRamazan was busy much of this past week up in the Master Cabin and here is is fitting the FastMount fasteners for the access panel below the seat in the Master Shower.  This provides full access for all the plumbing and water manifolds hidden away inside the base of the Shower Seat.
    PXL_20210209_154731732Which the Captain is particularly looking forward to and testing out here.
    PXL_20210212_090146782.MPJust outside the Shower, Ramazan has now installed the mirrors on this cabinet above the Vanity Sink at the very forward end of the Master Cabin.
    PXL_20210212_090139258As well as these mirrors on the doors of the cabinets above the sink inside the Master Head/Bathroom.
    PXL_20210212_090153000Overhead dropped ceiling above our bed is reflected in the mirror here so you may need to look twice to figure out that this is the full length mirror that Ramazan is mounting to the inside of the Shower/Head door now laying on top of the bed.
    PXL_20210210_114238050From the outside looking in I find Ramzan up at the Main Helm taping off the Rosewood Window Sills as he installs all 21 of the HVAC air vents on all the SuperSalon windows.
    PXL_20210209_145448167We were able to track down these very well made rotating adjustable air diffusers that are made for use in many different makes of cars and trucks and are the Goldilocks solution for bringing the hot or cold air from our AC/Heating system into the SuperSalon.
    PXL_20210209_145444826Same as the ones you would be familiar with in your car, these rotate and can be closed shut as in the photo above or tilted open at different angles.  This will give us full adjustment to the air coming in to direct it into the room or up onto the windows for some defroster like function.
    PXL_20210211_065125892.MPThe largest front and center window in front of the Main Helm gets 3 of these vents.
    PXL_20210210_093744601And all the other windows have 2 diffusers.
    PXL_20210212_140108449Captain Christine has jumped feet first into the deep end of the electronics systems on Möbius and had a very busy week working with things like our PepWave cellular/WiFi router which I will cover in another post focussed on all of our electronics.
    PXL_20210211_121005189We had just enough of this gorgeous Turkish Turquoise marble from our inside Galley to use in our Outdoor Galley countertops as well and that all got mounted this past week.
    PXL_20210211_121753402We didn’t have quite enough to do all the countertops in single slabs but we are SO in love with this marble that we created the tops out of several pieces.
    PXL_20210211_123229143The system I came up with started with 6mm AL plates that are through bolted to the Vent Boxes underneath and then the marble is permanently adhered to these AL plates with industrial SikaFlex. 

    This allows me to remove the whole countertop for future access by unbolting these AL plates and provided a super solid backing for all the marble pieces.
    PXL_20210211_123332857First slab with the cut-out for the SS sink all glued in and ready for the 2nd piece.
    PXL_20210211_123402577To be set into the SikaFlex much like how you would lay ceramic tiles. 
    PXL_20210211_132235204.MPThis will give you a sense of how our Outside Galley is shaping up and next week the marble team will be in to finish sealing and polishing the tops and edges.  I can smell the salmon cooking on the BBQ already!

    Möbius Goes to the Dogs!

    PXL_20210209_154420571Saving a bit of the best for the last, our two dogs, 14 year old Ruby the Wonderdog in Black and 9 year old Barney The Yorkshire Terror were onboard for the first time with Captain Christine so they could check out what will soon be their new floating home too. 

    Like us, they have both spent most of their lives as boat dogs and so are awaiting the move onto their new boat/home as anxiously as we are.
    PXL_20210209_154321990.MPBarney is a rather “excitable boy” who can sometimes get a wee bit too excited at the edges of our boats so the bottom Dyneema lifeline that Christine now has all finished is at a custom “Barney height” so he got to measure up to that.
    PXL_20210209_154649602.MPAnd down in the Master Cabin we have what we refer to as The Barney Bed, where Mr. Actionallnightlong, will be able to sleep and practice is nightly training for the Olympics all by himself!
    And THAT folks is going to have to be a wrap for tonight as I am Wayyyyyyyyy past my time limit and bedtime and dinner still awaits.

    Thanks SO much for taking the time to join us here again this week and just because it is taking me much longer than I would like to answer them, PLEASE keep adding your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

    See you here again next week as we take yet another of our infinite half steps forward.

    -Wayne