Getting Ready to Stop and Go?! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Oct. 5-10, 2020

The focus this week was on building the aluminium Console for the Upper Helm Station in the SkyBridge (the GO part of this week’s title), getting Mr. Gee his fuel supply, continuing to check off more electrical and interior jobs and prepare our anchor chain for anchoring (the Stop part of this week’s title). 

We were delighted to welcome back more members of Team Möbius as they return from the other boats they’ve been working on so let’s jump right into this week’s Show & Tell so you can see it all for yourself.

SkyBridge Helm Station

Upper Helm Console perspectiveHere is the design we came up with for the aluminium console that will hold all our navigation equipment for the Upper Helm Station in the SkyBridge.  Click to enlarge this (or any image) to see some of the items that will be installed in this console and I’ll put a list of all of these below.

Upper Helm Console layout center dimsAs shown in this layout drawing, the equipment that will be mounted in this console include:

  • 2 Side by Side 24″ LiteMax NavPixel Daylight Readable Touch Monitors
  • Furuno 711C Autopilot Control Head
  • Vetus Bow Thruster Joystick Model BPAJ
  • Maxwell VWC 4000 Windlass Up/Down Control
  • Kobelt Engine Throttle and CPP Pitch Controls
  • Kobelt Pitch Gauge
  • Standard Horizon GX6000 Fixed-Mount VHF Radio
  • Kobelt Control Switches & Remote Walkabout plug-in socket
  • SH SCU-30 Wireless Access Point
  • Exterior Lights switch panel
  • Engine Stop/Start buttons
  • Horn button

Upper Helm Console perspective RhinoAlthough the SkyBridge area is quite well protected by the solid roof above created by the aluminium frame for the 8 320W solar panels mounted on top, and the removable plexiglass windows which wrap 360 degrees around the whole SkyBridge, it will still be exposed to wind and rain at times so we needed to build a waterproof console to protect all these critical and eXpen$ive electronics.
We had been working on the design of this console for a long time and were very pleased to be able to enlist the help of Burak who had been our 3D modeler when we first started working with Naval 3 years ago, to work out the details and finalise this design.  One additional design element we needed to accomplish was that this whole console needed to be removable for two reasons.  First being that it needs to be removed when we convert the boat to “hunkered down/Canal mode” and lower the articulated roof.  And secondly Christine and I want to try out having this Upper Helm Station in different locations in the SkyBridge as we use the boat for the first year or so.  We think that its current location at the Aft end of the SkyBridge will work out best but we won’t know for sure till we can live with it in different scenarios and different positions.

IMG_20201006_134238Burak sent over all the 2D construction drawings last week and so Uğur jumped right in on Monday morning and spent most of this past week taking this console from start to finish by Friday.  Let’s follow along as he works.
IMG_20201006_163445It would have taken another week or more to send out all the AL plate to be CNC cut and I think Uğur enjoyed the chance to go back to some “old school” ways so he quickly laid out all the parts directly on the AL plate and cut out the pieces with the in-house bandsaw and a cutting disk on his angle grinder. 
IMG_20201007_102035As we have tried to do throughout the design and build of XPM78-01 Möbius, we KISS’ed (Keep It Simple & Safe) the design of this console so there are only 8 pieces in total and they are all made out of 5mm / 3/16” flat AL plate which are easily tacked in place.
IMG_20201007_095728To provide ready access for installing and maintaining all the electrical connections and components inside this console we made the whole back side a removable plate that will be bolted in place with a watertight gasket.
IMG_20201007_110249With a quick check that all the dimensions and angles were all correct, Uğur got to work doing all the finish welding.

BTW, for those who might wonder why all the photos of welding have these lines in them it is due to the MIG welders being the newer Pulse type and the camera freeze-frames these pulses.
IMG_20201008_093015With the welds cleaned up a bit Uğur laid out the various cut-outs for each item to be installed on the dashboard and then cut these out with a hole saw or cutting wheel.
IMG_20201008_162003We are still waiting for a few switches to arrive but we have all the primary components so Uğur and I did a quick check to make sure they all fit properly before continuing.
MVIMG_20201008_175448Next it was time to finalise the location of the console on top of the foundation built into the SkyBridge (and for Cihan our Master Plumber to get in this quick cameo!)  The two cushions on the Port/Left side allow someone to comfortably join the person on watch as well as a great spot to lie down for a nap up here.
IMG_20201009_093944After trying a few different spots we settled on this positioning with the same amount of overhang around the three sides.
Llebroc Upper Helm ChairThis is our Llebroc Helm Chair which will soon
IMG_20201009_175908…….. reside here, in the center of the space behind the dashboard.

IMG_20201009_093800This penetration on the inside provides a watertight pass through for all the cables.  Once all the cables have been installed and all systems checked that they are fully functional, this and all other penetrations throughout the boat are filled with certified “goo” to create a fully watertight seal.
IMG_20201009_093852Here is how the Upper Helm Station it looks from the back side. 
IMG_20201009_175928Holding the camera at about eye height here to check the sight lines which are great as you can easily see the whole forward end of the bow anchor area.
Kobelt 7176 Walk About RemoteWhenever we prefer to have an even better close up view of around the boat, we have one of these Kobelt 7176 “Walk-About” remote controllers at both Helms. 

With 10m / 33ft of cable, I’m not willing to trust wireless for this critical control, we can stand almost anywhere on the boat from the Swim Platform to the Bow, either side deck and from anywhere in either the Main or SkyBridge Helm areas and have all the controls literally at our fingertips when docking or take this remote controller to wherever we are sitting.

The two side levers control Throttle and Pitch and up on top are controls for Rudder, Bow Thruster, CPP Clutch and Horn.  Can’t wait to try all these out on our upcoming sea trials once we launch.


And Yes, Launch Date is still “Thursday”, just don’t ask which one! Smile


Plumbing Progress:

IMG_20201008_094241We finally have Cihan back full time again (we hope!) and he was his usual busy productive self all over Möbius.  Cihan and I started by working on the two heat exchangers …..
IMG_20201007_151751…….. that needed to be mounted in the very aft end of the Engine Room.
IMG_20201007_150606We built in this removable section of the flooring to provide full access to this important area where the prop shaft enters the boat.  The composite grid flooring lifts out and then this aluminium floor plate can be unbolted and removed as well.
IMG_20201007_151707Access is particularly important whenever I need to service the “dripless” Tides Marine SureSeal Drip Free Self-Aligning Shaft Seal that keeps all the water out of the joint where the prop shaft exits the log tube.
Tides Marine dripless SureSeal assemblyI will cover more details when we are installing this SureSeal but here is a quick overview of how it works.
IMG_20201007_151716Today though we wanted to access the very aft ends of the two Engine Beds on either side where we wanted to mount these two Bowman heat exchangers.  The red one on the far Port/Left side is for cooling the hydraulic oil in the Nogva CPP Gearbox and the Silver one on the far Stbd/Right side is for cooling the Gardner’s water/antifreeze engine coolant. 
Bowman Heat Exchanger cut away viewBoth of these heat exchangers have cool seawater being pumped through their outer shells while the oil is pumped through a round “stack” of CuNi (Copper/Nickle) tubes that you can see here in this cutaway illustration. 
Fun Fact:  Bowman is another one of the world leading industrial companies we have found here in Turkey and so it was fun to find that our Nogva Norwegian CPP system came with that Red Bowman Heat Exchanger.

IMG_20201008_094254My apologies for getting too busy to get too many photos of this installation of these two heat exchangers but the basic flow of the seawater is that it first enters the Left end of the Silver Heat Exchanger at the top of this photo, exits out the rear and then flows through the Gray (protective wrap) hose on the far Right here where it will enter the aft end of the Red Heat Exchanger at the bottom.  Inside the Engine Room, the seawater exits the front end of the Red Bowman Heat Exchanger through another rubber hose that goes up to the Halyard SS mixing elbow on the Gardner’s wet exhaust system and then exits the boat through the large Exit Sea Chest in the ER.  Much more to come on all that once we start installing the exhaust system in the next few weeks.
IMG_20201007_130735Another new plumbing addition that Cihan installed this past week is the small little circulation pump with the White faceplate you can see at the bottom middle of this photo of the underside of the Stbd/Right side Workbench in the Workshop.
IMG_20201007_130740These Jabsco/Xylem 24V “vario” pumps are very cool and very eXpen$ive but boy do they work well.  These are a relatively new pump generation that are super quite with minimal energy consumption, shaftless spherical motor and permanent magnet technology.
On Möbius we are using this D5 Vario 38/700B pump to keep hot water circulating through our DHW (Domestic Hot Water) loop that ensures that there is always hot water immediately available to every hot water tap and shower on the boat.  No more wasting time and water while you wait for hot water to come out of the sink faucet or shower nozzle!


IMG_20201007_130544Speaking of hot water, the Captain aka Christine, is eXtremely eXcited about Cihan installing two of these SS towel warmers; one in each cabin’s Head/Bathroom!

Christine has been wanting to have one of these for years and after a very long and winding road to find these Goldilocks just right versions, she will finally have one in our Master Cabin as will all our guests in their Bathroom.
Laris towel warmerYet another example of the Turkish manufacturers making eXtremely high quality products, Christine fell in lust for these “Laris” model SS towel warmers from Hamman Radiator.
IMG_20201007_145715The towel warmers attach to the walls with these very clever SS tubes which Cihan first attaches to the walls using an expanding bolt on the inside of each tube. 
IMG_20201007_145725

And then there are four round SS pegs on the back of the towel warmers which slide into these tubes and are locked in place with the little set screw you can see on the bottom here.

The two SS square fittings the bottom are the water valves to control the flow of hot water through the towel warmer. 


Laris towel warmer upper corner photoHere is what the finished mounting looks like.

Many won’t understand, but to my eye, all of this hardware and the towel racks themselves are just beautiful works of art and engineering that are part of our “boat jewelry” collection on Möbius.

Interior Progress:

IMG_20201009_175606Looking around our Master Head/Shower/Bathroom do your sharp eyes might spot a few other new additions?

One job Serkan just completed is the mounting of those two SS latches now installed on those bottom two cabinet doors underneath where the sink will mount.
IMG_20201006_152851And if you look very closely you will see that the White Corian countertop has arrived.  There will be a clear glass partition that extends up that slot between the shower seat and the ceiling and will be sealed to that vertical surface at the end of this countertop.
IMG_20201009_175617And what is this new addition that just showed up this week beside the VacuFlush toilet?
IMG_20201009_175623Aha!  That’s the wireless remote control panel for the BioBidet BB-1000 Supreme bidet seat.  It clips into a holder mounted on the cabinet so the curious can remove it and discover all the MANY functions available.   The same BioBidet is installed in the Guest Cabin as well BTW.


Surely you didn’t think I put the eXplorer in XPM for no reason did you?

IMG_20201009_175715More examples of how XPM78-01 Möbius is a true world eXplore can be seen in another new addition this week as Hilmi starts installing all our Vimar “Arké Metal” switches and plug ins.  We have designed Möbius to be a true “World Boat” and so she has both 120V 60Hz and 230V 50Hz AC plugs like these throughout the boat.
IMG_20201009_175805We also have wired CAT7 ethernet plugs spread throughout the boat for maximum internet speeds.  This one is tucked away below the “floating” shelf on Christine’s side of our King size bed.
IMG_20201009_175811And these are what the matching Vimar light switches look like.  Of course these will all look MUCH better once we remove all the protective plastic coverings and do a good cleanup prior to launch, but until then we are very glad to have all the interior surfaces covered up while construction continues.
IMG_20201009_175517And here is Hilmi installing a set of four of those Vimar switches for the LED lights around the stairwell leading down into the Master Cabin.
IMG_20201007_130452Serkan has also been busy in the Master cabin adding finishing touches such as these solid Ro$ewood handholds on the “Swiss” (as in Swiss Army Knife) door that is the door for both the entrance into the Master Cabin and the full length hanging locker as it is here.
IMG_20201007_130457He needed to radius both ends of these so that they cleared the door jambs when closed on the Entryway.  The upper panel will soon be covered with the same Green/Gray leather you see throughout the Master Cabin walls.

Aluminum Finishing:

IMG_20201010_151441Nihat also had a very productive week as he took on the eXtremely big job of finishing all the exterior aluminium surfaces.  We’ve settled on the “brushed” look that these 3M abrasive discs create when used with a random orbital sander such as this pneumatic one in the photo here.

Let us know what do you think of this look but we are very pleased with it.

Feeding Mr. Gee!

IMG_20201006_174218I managed to make more time for Mr. Gee again this week and focused on installing his “feeding” system to deliver the Goldilocks just right amount of scrupulously clean diesel fuel.

This is one of his six fuel injectors that have been refurbished to factory new condition by Michael and his crew at Gardner Marine Diesel at the Gardner “factory” in Kent England.  Injectors just don’t get much better or simpler than this.  NO electronics just a simple supply connection under the Red seal on the Right and a matching return connection on the Left.
IMG_20201006_174242Each injector slides into the tubular hole you can see underneath the tip of the injector here.
IMG_20201006_183919Then one of these lever arms is tightened down using the castellated nut just to the Left of the Red cap here.  This lever presses the angled end of the injector body into its matching seat inside the tubular hole in the cylinder head and forms a perfect seal to keep all those literally eXplosive forces inside the cylinder where they belong and where they then supply all the mighty “draft horsepower” and torque that Mr. Gee delivers to our propeller.
IMG_20201009_095258Now each of those injectors need an equally robust set of piping to deliver the diesel fuel to/from them so my next job was to clean up all these steel fuel lines and give them a couple of coats of shiny black epoxy. 

Can’t have any bare steel on Mr. Gee that would just rust now can we?!
IMG_20201010_182610Here is what those shiny Black steel fuel lines look like when they are connected to the bottom outlets on the Fuel Injection Pump and then go up to the injectors in the cylinder heads through the AL valve covers I have set in place here.

Again my apologies for being too busy installing all these fuel components to take more photos but I will take more this coming week and put them into next week’s Progress Update for you.

For now I hope this quick shot of where I left of yesterday (Sat. Oct. 10th) will do.

 

Yachts Play Games Bula Bula Right?!

IMG_20201010_124709Christine and I spent Saturday morning doing a job that believe it or not, we have long been looking forward to; painting the length marking strips on our 13mm / 1/2” galvanized HT anchor chain. 

The joy in this job is that it reminds us that in the not too distant future (we hope!) we will be using these marks to tell us how much anchor chain we have let out in the latest anchorage we have just arrived at.

We started by dragging all 300 meters / 328 feet of chain off the factory pallet onto the shop floor and arranging it in 10 meter long loops with paper underneath both ends where we would be spray painting the chain.
IMG_20201010_125720There are a LOT of different ways to mark an anchor chain and even more opinions about which is best but we have both anchored thousands of time in our marine lives and find that painting different colours onto the chain and then adding some matching coloured nylon zip ties is the Goldilocks just right method for us.
IMG_20201010_133147We paint a different colour combination each 10 meters / 33’ and to help us remember the distance of each colour we came up with the acronym YPGBR based on the colours of paint we have used this time.  As you might figure out from this photo, YPGBR  stands for Yellow-Pink-Green-Blue-Red which is the order of the colours we painted onto the chain every 10 meters. 

These are the odd numbered 10 meter marks starting with Yellow at the first 10m mark at the top here, then:

  • Pink @ 30m,
  • Green @ 50m,
  • Blue @ 70m
  • Red @ 90m
    IMG_20201010_133158At the other end of the loops we use a combination of the colours to mark the even starting lengths of;
  • Yellow/Pink @ 20 meters
  • Pink/Green @ 40m
  • Green/Blue @ 60m
  • Blue/Red @ 80m

Confusing right? 

Nope!  Easy for us to remember when the YPGBR acronym stands for is:

  • Yachts
  • Play
  • Games
  • Bula Bula**
  • Right?!!
    For those who might wonder, Bula is the Fijian greeting, always said with great Gusto, which we learned so well from all our years cruising in Fiji

Once the paint dried we flaked the chain back onto the pallet and it is now ready to be pulled aboard into its Chain Bin inside the Forepeak but that will have to wait for next week’s Progress Update here on Möbius.World.

Thanks as always for joining us and be sure to add your thoughts and ideas in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

– Wayne & Christine

Mr. Gee Gets Plumbed – Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius Sept. 27-Oct. 2, 2020

This week’s Progress Update will be short and sweet as we are still working very shorthanded on XPM78-01 Möbius and it has been another very full weekend of boat related work for Christine and me so it is already late Sunday here as I sit down to write up this week’s Progress Update for you.  However, progress is being made and there are interesting new developments to show you so let’s jump right in for this week’s Show & Tell aboard the Good Ship Möbius.

INTERIOR OUTFITTING:

IMG_20200928_154758Serkan was onboard for two days this week as he continues to work on the last of the hardware related work in the Master Cabin.  On Tuesday he was installing the last of these beautiful SS latches on the doors and drawers on the front Starboard/Right side wall of the Master Cabin.  He is down to the last latch on the bottom drawer below the vanity sink that you can see in the bottom Left here.
IMG_20201001_191516A bit different perspective on Thursday, looking straight down the centerline towards the bow of the boat you can see that the bottom drawer has now been installed along with the two matching latches on the White bottom cupboard doors inside the Head/Bathroom on the far Left.

And Serkan has almost all the Green/Gray leather panels installed now, just the small strips around the Vanity cabinet at the far end.  The door of that Vanity as well as the main Head door will soon have mirrors mounted on them to finish this area off.
IMG_20201001_094647Upstairs in the SuperSalon an exciting new development is now visible.  The window frames are now all filed with their plywood templates which will be sent out to the glass company next week so they can cut and prep all the 25mm/1” thick laminated window glass as well as the other glass for the flush Deck Hatches.
IMG_20200930_123018And the “eyebrow” around the upper SkyBridge.

IMG_20201001_094639Still very much a “work in progress” but the whole SuperSalon is beginning to come into view now.

It will be a VERY big day when we finally get all the glass installed onboard and make Möbius fully weathertight for the first time.

ALUMINIUM WORK:

IMG_20200928_175925Our faithful Dynamic Duo of Uğur and Nihat had another full and productive week.  If you were with us last week you’ll remember they were busy getting the ceiling over the Outside Galley on the Aft Deck all fully insulated wtih 50mm EPDM foam and the attachment points for the White AlucoBond laminated sheets that will form the ceiling itself.
IMG_20200928_175941As with the other AlucoBond panels you’ve seen them mounting in the Engine Room and Workshop, they use these very nice covered screws to attach the AlucoBond to the aluminium L-bar supports.  If you look closely at the screw in the upper Left here (click to enlarge any photo) you can just make out the brass threaded washer around the head of the countersunk screw and then the chrome dome cover thread onto that to completely hide the underlying screw head.
IMG_20200929_094429Here is what the ceiling looks like viewed from down inside the SuperSalon looking up and out the Entryway WT Door onto the Aft Deck Galley.

For those wondering, the White, Black and Red lettering is just a protective film on all AlucoBond panels which will be removed just before we launch to reveal the White anodized aluminium outer surface of all these panels.
IMG_20200930_123340And here is what it looks like from the other end out on the Aft Deck.

The Black wiring hanging down is for the six LED lights when we are cooking in this Outdoor Galley or dimmed down for safe lighting when entering or leaving the boat.
IMG_20200930_123422This is the Port/Left Vent Box which served double duty as one of our Outdoor Galley countertops with this SS sink in it.

The rectangular openings are filled with the Mist Eliminator grills and damper system for the Entry Air going down to the bottom of the Engine Room.
IMG_20200930_123428And this is the matching STBD/Right side Vent Box with the two rectangular openings for the extraction air from the Engine Room and Workshop.

The raised surface on the Left will be the main countertop in this Galley and the lower countertop will soon house the 220V electric Grill/BBQ.

All the countertops will be Turquoise Turkish marble to match that in the inside Galley.

For the observant ones who might wonder, the two small outlets on the Aft facing bottom of this Vent Box on the far Right are for the quick connect water fittings for our Deck Wash hoses; one for Fresh Water, one for Salt.
IMG_20200928_104603However the most exciting new milestone Nihat and Uğur hit his past week was that they started on the final cleanup of all the bare exterior aluminium surfaces.  Nihat spent most of the rest of the week working on the AL surfaces surrounding the SkyBridge.


IMG_20201002_162644This is a two part process, first grinding all the welds to be either flush or nicely radiused corners such as you can see Nihat has done here on the frame for the SkyBridge Console and the surrounding interior walls.
IMG_20201002_161953Then he moved on to all the AL surfaces and welds on the surfaces outside of the SkyBridge itself.
MVIMG_20201002_162657Such as the tops of these “horns” on either side of the Front hinged Solar Panel bank and the outer walkway that runs down the sides of the SkyBridge.
IMG_20200930_162337Uğur took on the daunting task of grinding down all the welds on the outside surfaces of all the Hull plates.  There are three longitudinal runs of welds down each side where the different thicknesses of hull plates butt together.  The top one he is working on here is the only “hard chine” or corner on the hull which is a bit trickier as the weld needs to be ground down flush to each plate and then have a nice radius for the turn of the corner.
IMG_20200930_164606It is difficult to capture in photos, especially at this early stage but this will give you an idea.

The surface on the far Right here is part of our experimenting with different kinds of final swirl patterns for the final finish to see which one we like the best. 
IMG_20200930_164616This shot will help you see how the process of finishing this corner seam goes.  The corner on the far Left is close to what the finished chine or corner will look like and as you move to the Right towards Uğur you can see the progression “backwards” through the process with the raw untouched weld on the far Right.
IMG_20201002_162031This longer view will help you understand the “daunting” part of Ugur’s job!  24 meters / 78 feet down each side suddenly becomes a VERY real and very big number when you are taking it on one centimeter or inch at a time and then three of those lengths (one for each weld seam, on each side.  I’ll let you do the math!
MVIMG_20201001_094442The maximum sheet size for aluminium plates is 6m/19ft so there is also a vertical seam where each end of the plates butt together that also needs to be ground flush.
IMG_20201002_162115And up at the Bow there are a lot of transitions where the different hull plate thicknesses, 10, 12, 15, 20 and 25mm thick all come together where they meet up wtih the 25mm thick Keel Bar and that nice round transition up at the top where it wraps around our big solid AL “nose” cone for the snubber line when at anchor.
IMG_20201002_162127By quitting time on Friday though Uğur and Nihat has already done their first passes of their welds on the Stbd/Right side so that was a LOT of progress in just a few days.  Lots more to come next week so stay tuned as I show you the continued evolution of finishing the hull.

ELECTRICAL DETAILS:

IMG_20201002_155606The newest member of our growing family of Victron equipment finally arrived and got installed this week.  It is the newest Victron Blue box that you can see in the bottom Right corner of this AL panel in the Forward Port corner of the Basement. 

If you click and zoom in on this or the photo below, you can see that this tiny Cerbo GX box provides us with communication ports for USB, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and a MicroSD slot as well as the Victron VE.Can nd VE.bus connections.

IMG_20201002_155613We have had Victron equipment on our previous boats for many years with great success but one area that has been lacking is their integration in communicating with each other and the whole GX line is helping to resolve that.
Victron Cerbo GX Connections diagramThe Cerbo GX is also the newest bit of kit from Victron and makes a huge leap forward in getting all our Victron equipment onto our N2K network as well as bringing all our Victron into a much more integrated system.
IMG_20201002_155903Just around that front Port corner is our “Solar City” wall where all 14 of our Victron SmartSolar 100/20 MPPT controllers which connect to each of our 14 320Wp Light Tech solar panels.  The Gray box is the junction box for all the wiring and the 14 circuit breakers for the DC outputs of each MPPT controller.

PLUBMING:


IMG_20200929_094455Diagonally opposite on the Stbd Aft corner, we managed to steal our Plumbing Wizard Cihan back for one day and he finished installing the last 2 Whale Gray Water Tank pumps.  This pump extracts Gray water out of the integral AL tank below and pushes it out the Sea Chest that you can just barely see on the far Left here.

Given that we are rarely in marinas and on anchor, the vast majority of the time our Gray Water (sinks & showers) goes directly to an exiting Sea Chest but when that’s not allowed, the Grey Water is stored in one of our three Gray Water tanks and hence the need for this Whale pump to empty those tanks when we are out at sea.


The big Clear/White tank on the Right is our Potable Water tank which ensures that we always have at least 150 litres of pure water to use even if we should somehow loose all access to the 7100L/1875USG of fresh water in our six integral AL tanks in the bottom of the hull.


IMG_20201002_162557Some of that fresh water goes into this HazMat Locker on the Port side of the Swim Platform for our Aft Shower.  As you can see here we have hidden the shower mixing valve and head inside this locker to keep it out of the way and protected from daily UV and salt water. 
IMG_20201002_162544Cihan has mounted a holder for the shower spray head inside here as well so it is easy to just open the locker and grab the shower head to rinse off after a snorkel exploration or for a nightly shower.  There will be another showerhead mount up on the Aft railing so you can have a hands free shower as well for shampooing your hair or whatever.
IMG_20201002_153552Inside on the front Stbd/Right side of the Workshop by the Day Tank, Cihan was also able to install these two Black hockey puck shaped Maretron FFM100 Fuel Flow Meters. 
IMG_20201002_153520The upper Left Fuel Flow Meter is on the Fuel Supply line going into the dual FleetGuard 2-stage fuel filters
IMG_20201002_153530and the one on the lower Right.is on the Return Fuel line from Mr. Gee our Gardner 6LXB engine.  Having these high precision flow meters allows us to know the exact amount of fuel being consumed at any time and helps us run Mr. Gee at his maximum efficiency at all times.
IMG_20201002_153608And if you were to bend down and take a peek underneath the Day Tank you would see this latest addition Cihan has made out the bottom of the Sump on the Day Tank.  The Black threaded nipple you see here is where the WIF or Water In Fuel sensor will be installed.  Being heavier than Diesel fuel, water always sinks to the bottom so if we ever get any water in our fuel is will quickly find its way down to the bottom most point and send us a WIF signal and sound an alarm. 

If you go back and look two photos above at the FleetGuard Fuel Filters you will see that each of the Fs19596 Fuel Filter/Separators has their own WIF sensor in the bottom so we are sure to know if water ever shows up in the fuel at any time and we can promptly get rid of it before it has any chance to get near Mr. Gee.

Mr. Gee

Speaking of Mr. Gee, I was able to spend more time working on him this past week focusing on timing and plumbing so let’s head over to the Engine Room to take a look.

IMG_20200929_144334This was an exciting new milestone for Mr. Gee and me as I finally got to mount this Fuel Injection Pump and Cam Box assembly taking up most of the Port/Left side of Mr. Gee.  If you look at the far front end you can see the PTO (Power Take Off) shaft coming out of Mr. Gee which turns the fuel injection camshaft that in turn created the high pressure that goes up to each injector sprayer at just the right time.
IMG_20200929_171614At the aft or flywheel end of the Gardner it is Grand Central Station for all these Copper & Brass lubrication oil pipework’s.  They all come together here where the cast iron Oil Filter acts as the traffic cop for all the oil coming and going to the rest of the engine.
IMG_20201002_183242Many hours of “pipe wrangling” later, this is how the pipework’s look when all connected to the Oil Filter on the top Right here and then going heading on to their connections on the other end to the crankcase, oil cooler which has its own dedicated oil pump which is the Burgundy painted unit extending out of the AL Cam Box in the rear Left here.
IMG_20200930_184533I won’t bore you with all the details, but Gardner engines have multiple “timing” settings that are critical to get absolutely spot on for the engine to run properly.  The timing of when each intake and exhaust valve needs to open and close is one example that I tackled this week.  The requirement is that the Intake Valve opens at 16.25 degrees Before Top Dead Center and the Exhaust closes at 11.75 degrees Aft TDC.  But how do you measure and set to such accuracy?
IMG_20200930_181033The method I came up with was to put a piece of masking tape on the outer circumference of the flywheel covering the distance between the two precise lines punched on at the Gardner Factory to mark TDC and 25.8 degrees BTDC which is for timing the fuel injectors. 
Then I peeled off the masking tape and laid it out on a flat AL surface where I could accurately measure the distance between “zero” at TDC and the 25.8 degree line with my digital Vernier calipers which gave me the numbers I needed to figure out how many mm one degree of rotation is.
IMG_20200930_181023Pretty simple math that even I could figure out.  It was 127.7mm from the TDC line to 25.8 degrees so 127.8 / 25.8 = 4.872mm = 1 degree.  Easy to then mark off the distances for the 16.25 degree and 11.75 degree marks.
IMG_20200930_183539Now all I had to do was put put the masking tape strip back on with the TDC mark on the tape matched up with the TDC mark on the flywheel and then mark the flywheel at the 16.25 BTDC and 11.75 ATDC lines and then put a center punch mark at each one and scribe a line through them.  Lining these marks up with the reference line you can see scribed into the top and bottom of this opening in the flywheel housing and I can turn the flywheel to align these marks and precisely adjust the valve timing at each point. 


IMG_20201002_183229That will be where I start tomorrow (Monday) morning so I’ll let you know how that works out in next week’s Progress Update.

So this is the parting shot of Mr. Gee when I left him last and where I will start tomorrow morning.  And my first order of business will be to find the slob that dribbled that bit of Wellseal gasket sealer on the top of the cam box!   Oh wait, never mind, I just caught my reflection in the monitor and I found him!
Thanks for joining me here on this week’s Show & Tell for the week of September 27 to October 3rd, 2020.  Really appreciate you taking the time to follow along and I sure hope you will add your comments, questions and concerns in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Hope to see you here again next Sunday.

-Wayne

Damit, that’s a mighty fine Davit! Progress Update Sept. 21-25, 2020

Starting with the biggest news first; Christine and I took a much needed “mental health day” by renting a car and driving up the coast for an overnight getaway in a lovely little area we’ve been to before that is only an hour’s drive from our apartment in Antalya.  We’ve been working non-stop seven days a week for the past six months and thought it would be smart to take a brief break from boat building. 


antalya-province map of overnight getaway Sept 26 2020We are very fortunate that the Antalya Free Zone and our apartment are at the very far West end of the city of Antalya that stretches over 30km along the long crescent shaped coastline of the Gulf of Antalya you see here.  The mountains rise up around us less than 1km from the beach and we only drive about 2km SW to put us on a fabulous coastal road along the tree lined rocky coast.


IMG_20200926_121427

Christine found a fabulous little cabin for our getaway in a little village which in the 60’s and 70’s was the center of an area filed with “hippies” from around the world who built a lot of treehouses which have now evolved into little resorts with 2-10 small cabins on the property.  So I left the shipyard very early Friday afternoon at 15:30 and we packed up the pups and some snacks and were on the coastal road by four. 
We checked into our little cabin and then spent a few hours walking through the small village along the river front which filled with lots of arts and crafts shops, cafes and restaurants which led us down to the pebbly beach where our boat dogs Ruby & Barney enjoyed  being back to salt water beaches after almost three years of being dirt dwellers with us. 

As you can see in the photo above, the beaches are as usual jam packed with other people.

IMG_0638The little “resort” we were at was run by a lovely Turkish family who cooked up a fabulous dinner that evening in an open air patio where we were almost the only guests to enjoy the owners excellent selection of jazz music during our long and leisurely dinner. 
Our host family again delighted us with a classic Turkish breakfast the next morning and we spent the rest of the day driving along the coast and up into the mountains to explore everything from Lycian tombs (click photo on left to enlarge) to mountaintop Roman ruins complete with amphitheatre and acropolis. We treated ourselves to dinner at our local marina which is only a few blocks from our apartment and the whole experience felt like much more than just an overnight getaway that really helped recharge our batteries for the final push to finish Möbius and Launch!


Back at Naval Yachts, it was another week of disappointedly limited progress on XPM78-01 Möbius herself as their other boat projects seem to take precedence.  The bright spot though was that our dynamic duo of Uğur and Nihat make a LOT of progress on the Davit Arch as they finished welding the Davit Arch onto the Aft Deck and it is now ready for rigging. 

In the Master Cabin, Serkan continued his single handed work installing the last of our favorite SS latches and he and Sinan completed installing the leather covered panels on the upper cabinet doors and the Bureau of Drawers.  Out on the Aft Deck, with Uğur welding the Davit bases to the deck, Nihat turned his attention to installing the EPDM foam insulation in the overhead roof and the big ER Deck Hatch. 

So grab a comfy chair and a favorite beverage and join me for this week’s Show & Tell Progress Update aboard XPM78-01 Möbius.

DAVIT ARCH:

Might as well start with the star of this week’s Show & Tell; the Davit Arch! 

Retrieving any dinghy in rough weather can often be eXtremely dangerous so we have been working since the early design stages with Dennis over three years ago now, to design a Davit system that is as safe and as fast as possible. 

Christine and I hope that our fellow cruisers who have launched and retrieved their share of dinghy’s and tenders will weigh in with your thoughts on this system by adding your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box at the end of the blog. 

First a couple of quick renders to show how we’ve designed this somewhat unique launch/retrieval system for the jet drive Tender to Möbius which you’ve seen being built in the previous weeks. 


Davit   Tender Up Down positionsWe had a very good hinged Davit system I had designed for the aft end of our previous sailboat that worked extremely well to launch and retrieve our 4m/13’ aluminium bottom RIB in under a minute so we took all the lessons learned there and used them to help guide us in the much more greater challenge of having a similarly safe and fast Davit system for our now 5m / 16/5’ 1100Kg/2400lb aluminium inboard diesel jet drive Tender. 
Right now Möbius is sitting too close to the boat next to it inside the shipyard to be able to do a dry run lifting the Tender On/Off the boat so we will have to wait until we launch to find out in real world terms how well this design is going to work.  However, between the two of us, Christine and I have cruised for many decades now and have launched and retrieved dinghy’s thousands of times spanning the full spectrum of different sizes and types of dinghy’s and tenders using an equally wide range of davits and we think this Davit Arch system will prove to be the safest and easiest to use Davit system we have ever used.  Stay tuned for that real world testing report in the next few months.


Davit   Tender Up on Deck PortAs you can see we have used the same type of “ladder” construction for the Davit Arch as on the Main Arch as this style has proven to be a Goldilocks combination of strength to weight and we also really like the overall visual esthetic of this matching pair of arches and how well it fits in wtih the overall eXpedition look of XPM78-01 Möbius.
Davit 3 piece Joiner plates renderI updated the design just before we ordered the aluminium to make the arch a three piece assembly that bolts together very simply using two doubler plates (light blue in the model) at the transition between the vertical legs and the horizontal beam. 
This allows us to dismantle the arch and take it down completely either in what we refer to as “Hunkered Down” mode in preparation for an impending cyclone (ask us how we know!) or for “Canal Mode” when we want to eXplore inland canal systems found throughout the world that have bridges with height restrictions lower than our air draft with the Main Arch and Skybridge roof and Davit Arch up.
Raising/lowering the Tender will be a very simple two stage operation and I will explain this all in much more detail wtih photos in a future Weekly Update when we start doing the two sets of rigging. 

1.   One set of rigging will move the angle of the Davit Arch itself from the near vertical Cyan coloured position you see in the first render above that puts the Tender fully up on deck and then lets the Davit Arch move sideways  towards the Port/Left side until it reaches the Purple coloured position where the Tender is now clear of the Deck. 

This rigging will be an all Dyneema setup starting with two attachment points at the Forward/Aft end of the overhead beam connecting to a a single line extending over and down through a turning block straight across the Deck on the Starboard/Right side Rub Rail and then lead to the big EST 65 Lewmar electric winch in the middle of the Aft Deck. 

2.   The second rigging will be a double set of vertical hanging lines to raise/lower the Tender in the Davit.  When the Tender is up on Deck these will raise/lower the Tender from its chocks and when over the side it will raise/lower the Tender from the water.  This will also use Dyneema line attached to a bridal clipped to four attachment points inside the hull of the Tender leading up to a block and tackle handing down from the Front and Aft ends of the overhead beam and leading back down to two EST40 Lewmar manual winches mounted inside of each vertical Arch leg.

With all that in mind let’s go see how Uğur & Nihat, aided by their student intern Omer, made this all come together this past week.  I will use the same technique as many seemed to like in covering the build of the Tender; a rapid fire set of photos with just a little bit or text along the way.  Here goes………………….

IMG_20200921_150444If you would like to review the building of the various components of the Davit Arch system you can look through the past 3 weeks of posts which covered their construction.  This week Uğur began by machining the two large cylindrical Hinges; one at the base of each vertical leg of the Arch.


IMG_20200921_150448He had welded the two Base Plates out of 20mm/ 3/4” AL plate a few weeks ago so now he was ready to machine the 100mm / 4” OD aluminium cylinders that fit between the two triangular sides on the Base Plates and the two SS Hinge Pins that slide through to create the Hinge.
IMG_20200922_110015KISS, Keep It Simple & Safe design for the whole hinge with these two SS Hinge Pins that have an end cap bolted on to keep them in place and snug up against the sides of those triangular support arms on the Hinge Plates.
IMG_20200922_150008While the Hinge Pins were being machined, Uğur and Nihat mounted the AL cylinders into the holes in the 25mm / 1” thick plates at the base of each vertical leg.  Some scrap pieces of AL were tacked on to hold the cylinder in perfect alignment and then welded them fully in place with multiple passes on each side.
IMG_20200922_181245All three parts now complete and ready to be bolted together to form the completed Davit Arch.
IMG_20200922_181256Aligning the holes in the two doubler plates.
IMG_20200922_181305And securing them with six 16mm / 5/8” bolts.
IMG_20200922_181437Torquing down all the bolts, Hinge Base Plates ready to be attached with their SS Hinge Pins.
IMG_20200923_094732Like this.
IMG_20200923_122659et Voila!  The Davit Arch is upright for the first time and ready to be moved up onto the Aft Deck of Möbius.

But how do we do that when the forklift can’t lift the Arch up high enough???
IMG_20200923_134305Simple!  Uğur quickly fabricates this Forklift Crane eXtension (patent pending) using some scrap lengths of 8” square steel tubing with a chain hoist and block hung from the top and the base jammed into one of the forks of the forklift.

Oh, and a couple of strong men to help steady the Arch in place.
IMG_20200923_134815Up Up Up goes the Arch ……..
IMG_20200923_135006……… as Uğur inches the forklift into the very tight space between Möbius and Twinity, the big composite catamaran hiding behind the scaffolding and plastic on the Right here.
IMG_20200923_135923The Forklift was till a wee bit too short for the Aft Hinge Base Plate to clear the deck but some pry bars and muscle helped to raise it the last few inches and the Davit Arch was no up and ready to be positioned precisely on the Aft Deck.
IMG_20200923_144927The laser level and a long tape measure allowed us to get each Hinged Base Plate in the same position that we had worked out on the 3D model.
IMG_20200923_151455And each plate was tacked in place so we could do some real world measurement and testing to make sure the somewhat complex geometry all worked out as in the 3D model for getting the Tender to clear the outer edge of the Port/Left Rub Rail and then get it fully on Deck to meet the requirement that no part of the Tender extends out past the vertical line of the outer Rub Rail.
IMG_20200923_151519A worms eye view from the Swim Platform looking up the Aft Vertical leg of the Davit Arch and a good vantage point to see how the Davit Arch hinges on the Base.
IMG_20200923_153338Our digital level was a big help in checking the angle of the vertical legs when they are in the fully upright position where the Tender will be Lowered/Raised on the Aft Deck.

We designed this to be just a bit less than vertical so there was always a bit of weight on the rigging when the Tender was hanging from the Davit Arch so the Arch would start to move as you loosened the line on the winch and belayed the line to move the Tender sideways and over the Port side where it can be lowered into the water.
IMG_20200923_153345Now I needed to see exactly where the Centerline of the keel of the Tender would be when lowered onto the Aft Deck so I scrounged around the yard and found two of these weights.  Not sure what they are or used to be but they worked just perfect to be Plumb Bobs that I could string from the top of both ends of the Davit Arch and mark the spot on the deck with my felt pen when the Plumb Bob string was exactly vertical.
IMG_20200923_162425With the forward and aft Plumb Bob points marked, a laser level and a 6 meter length of aluminium L-Bar provided enabled me to lay out the full centerline on the Aft Deck and then use this as our reference line to measure the position of the Davit Arch and Tender as they moved from fully onboard to fully off the Port side.
IMG_20200924_120714It took me several hours of laying out all the positions of the Tender and its clearances over the side as well as clearing the Port Vent Box you see off to the Left of the front Hinge Base.

We tried out about three different positions and tacked the bases in each one as you can see evidenced here with some of the previous tacks that were ground off so we could reposition and get that Goldilocks just right spot.
IMG_20200924_162119 You can see some of the different locations and colours I marked out on the deck until I though it was just right.
IMG_20200924_162655and gave Uğur the go ahead to weld them fully in place.
IMG_20200924_162201Here is what the Forward Leg of the Davit Arch looks like now fully welded in place.
IMG_20200925_141057And here is the Aft leg of the Arch now fully welded in place just inside the stairwell down to the Swim Platform.
IMG_20200925_141106As mentioned up in the beginning, the Tender is lifted Up/Down in the Davit Arch via two of these EST40 Lewmar winches.  This is the Aft winch.
IMG_20200925_150753And this is the Front Winch.  These EST40 winches have two speeds and are self tailing which should make lifting the Tender up off its deck chocks and out of the water very easy to do.
IMG_20200925_141126Once the Tender has been lifted up high enough for its bottom to clear the side deck, moving the Tender sideways onto the Aft Deck is even easier using this much larger and electric EST65 Lewmar winch.  You can now visualize how this single line from the winch goes up to the two bridle lines that go over to the front and aft ends of the Davit Arch.  And you can now see one of several uses for those two 50mm/ 2” thick aluminium Fairleads extending up out of the Starboard side Rub Rail.
IMG_20200925_095958Once we have the Tender strapped down into its chocks on the Aft Deck all the weight comes off the Davit Arch and I wanted to make sure that it was well secured when we were on passages.  Uğur came up with this simple design of two plates welded to the sides of the roof that sandwich the front vertical leg and ……
IMG_20200925_150753…. is then captured when the Arch is fully raised and rests against the forward side of the Roof overtop of the Aft Deck Galley.  We will make up a pin to slide through the two sandwich plates so that the Arch could not come loose and I may make this with an eccentric cam so I can lock the Arch tube tight against the rubber bumper that will be glued to the Roof edge and make for a nice tight holder that won’t rattle or move.
IMG_20200923_175019It is difficult to photograph the overall Davit Arch so I climbed up on the racks that separate the far bay in the shipyard to get this photo looking down at the Aft Deck of Möbius and Twinity off to its side.

Hope this helps to also give you a better sense of size and scale to the Aft Deck, Swim Platform, etc..

AFT DECK INSULATION:

In between building the Davit Arch, Nihat got busy putting in the 50mm / 2” thick EPDM foam insulation on the underside of the AL roof that extends out overtop of the two Vent Boxes. 


Aft Deck renderThese two Vent Boxes are primarily there to bring fresh air in and stale air out of the Engine Room and Workshop but we put them to double use as our Aft Outdoor Galley by making their tops out of the same Turkish Turquoise marble as in the main Galley and installing a nice SS sink on one side and our electric BBQ Grill on the other.
IMG_20200921_113713Up to now, the underside of this overhanging roof looked like this and so Nihat got busy filling in all those channels with 50mm thick EPDM foam insulation.
IMG_20200924_162457Like this.  Prior to putting in the EPDM foam, he welded in all the short lengths of aluminium L-bar you see here
IMG_20200925_150543…. that will be used to attach the White Alucobond ceiling panels which they started cutting out down on the shop floor beneath.
MVIMG_20200925_100225This is a view of that ceiling looking up from inside the SuperSalon through the main entrance door.
IMG_20200924_162449And while he was in an insulation mood, Nihat removed the large AL deck hatch overtop of the Engine Room and glued in all the 50mm thick EPDM onto its underside.  As with the rest of the walls and ceiling in the ER, this EPDM will next be surfaced with White Alucobond screwed to those AL L-Bars he has welded into the frame of the Hatch.

INTERIOR:

Last but not least for this week let’s go check out what’s been happening with the interior of Möbius.

IMG_20200920_120158The Captain is VERY happy to see these two SS towel warming racks finally show up at our apartment after months of searching to find them, putting through the order, getting them through Turkish Customs and finally getting them delivered.
IMG_20200920_120210They are both the same and one goes in our Master Head/Bathroom and one in the Guest Cabin Head.
IMG_20200920_120454Beautifully made, this is one of the brushed 316 SS valves that connects the towel rack to the SS Hot Water fittings mounted in the walls.  Can’t wait to show you what these look like when they’ve been installed so do stay tuned for that in a future episode here.
IMG_20200925_150921Serkan our Hardware guru, continued with his installation of those lovely SS latches I’ve been extolling ad nauseum the past few months.  He is now down to the last of these as he installs the final four on these lower cabinet doors on the Starboard side of the Master Cabin.  With so many to install and the need for each latch barrel to be in just the right spot, he has build this little jig to make it easier to drill the pilot hole for each latch.
IMG_20200925_100421Sinan had previously covered the panels for all the upper cupboard doors and the Bureau of Drawers with their beautiful Green/Blue leather and Serkan now has them all mounted and installed all their SS latches.
IMG_20200925_100306Looking forward along that same side with the Bed platform on the Bottom Left and the Shower/Bathroom Upper Left, you can see how the Master Cabin is starting to come together.
IMG_20200922_110347Bathroom door now hung and most of the Bathroom cabinets in place waiting for their Corian countertops and then the iridescent blue glass sink can be installed.
IMG_20200922_110330Same style glass Blue sink is in place in the Vanity at the very front end of our Master Cabin.  The upper part of the door will soon have the same Green/Blue leather panel installed
IMG_20200922_110412along with the door handle that will look like this.
IMG_20200922_110447Which is actually the handle installed on the “Swiss” double acting door for the Entrance to the Master Cabin and the tall Wardrobe on the Left.
IMG_20200922_110340I detest drafts, squeaks and rattles so all the interior doors have these silicone based seals inserted into thin slots cut into the corner of each door jamb.  As is so often the case it is the small details like this that make the difference between good and eXceptional and I smile every time I feel the soft squish as I close one of these doors and feel them seal tight as the door latches closed.

Anchor Shackle:

IMG_20200923_174111In the Absolutely Must Have category as well as the “Don’t ask me how long it took to get these here” category, it put an even bigger smile on our faces when these Crosby anchor shackles finally arrived.  Our anchor chain is 13mm / 1/2” but we were able to upsize the critical link between the chain and the anchor to this 16mm / 5/8” shackle.  One of the key bits of kit that truly help us Sleep Well At Night or SWAN as we often call it.
And THAT my family, friends and followers is a wrap for the week that was September 21 to 26, 2020.  Hope you enjoyed this week’s Progress Update and PLEASE let me know your thoughts, concerns and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Thanks for joining and I hope to see you here again next week.

-Wayne

Video Tours of XPM78-01 Möbius; July 15, 2020

Merhaba as we say here in Turkey, to all our faithful blog readers.  Just for a change of pace, this is Christine here and I wanted to let you know that we have heard all your many requests asking for a video tour showing the current stage of construction of our new boat and home Möbius.  So it is with great pleasure that we are finally able to honour your requests.

It had been a year since the last full video tour, and lots has changed for sure. Wayne just loves to talk and write – at great length – about his beloved Möbius, so one day he just took the camera and spent the next several hours walking through the boat and talking about it. That was a few weeks ago now on July 15, 2020

Wayne is far too busy working on Möbius right now to do the editing, so I took it upon myself to learn a new program (DaVinci Resolve, for those who are interested) and start my new career as the Möbius World video editor. I apologize for taking so long to get this done, but it had been a long time since I had done much video editing and the program is complex.

Also, there was A LOT of footage to take on for my first project; thanks Wayne!  So I decided to divide it in half and create a two part series for you, Part I of the Exterior of Möbius and Part II of the Interior, both of which you will find below.

First, a few notes about what I’ve done to these videos so you know how best to navigate your way through these quite long videos to get at just what you want.

CHAPTERS:

For those who want to skip through and just look at the portions of the video that interest you, I’ve divided the video into chapters which you can access two ways. 

  1. When viewing these videos on YouTube if you look in the text area below the video window, you will find a list of the Chapters in this video.   Click on any of the topics in that list to jump directly to that Chapter in the video.
  2. When watching the video if you hover your cursor over the bottom of the video window the timeline will appear at the bottom of each video and  you will see some dashes or marks along that timeline bar where each Chapter starts/ends.  If you hover your cursor over any bar a pop up text will tell you the name of that Chapter and if you click it will jump directly to that point in the video.

Here is are the lists of the Chapters in each video to give you an idea of what you will find when you watch the videos by clicking on the two video windows below.

PART I:  The Exterior

CHAPTERS in this video:

  1.      00:00 –Intro
  2.      00:42 – We introduce ourselves
  3.      01:50 – The swim platform
  4.      04:10 – The aft deck
  5.      12:00 – The sky bridge
  6.      20:56 – The side deck
  7.      21:44 – The foredeck
  8.      27:02 – Below the waterline


PART II:  The Interior

CHAPTERS in this video:

  1. 00:00 – Intro
  2. 00:46 – The workshop
  3. 15:20 – The guest cabin
  4. 20:42 – The tanks
  5. 21:58 – Aft circuit breaker panel
  6. 23:32 – The super salon
  7. 24:22 – The galley
  8. 32:26 – The settee
  9. 34:50 – Lower Helm
  10. 44:28 – The Basement
  11. 58:44 – The Master Cabin

I hope you will enjoy the tours AND that you will send us your feedback, comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

– Captain Christine

“Mr. Gee Go Home?” Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius–17-22 Aug, 2020

For those who might not have seen or remember the line from the movie “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”, this week’s title is in reference to the tag line in that film where the homesick little Extra-Terrestrial kept asking “E.T. Go Home?”.  Unlike Spielberg my little friend Mr. Gee is definately not imaginary but he has been asking me the same question for a very long time now; “Mr. Gee Go Home?”.  So it was a very special day on Monday this week when I got to grant Mr. Gee his wish and move him into his new home inside XPM78-01 Möbius.

While we remain very understaffed with many members of Team Möbius still working on other boats, those working on Möbius this week made great progress and we saw more exciting milestones this past week here at Naval Yachts so I’ve got lots for this Show & Tell.

Oh!  And be sure to pay close attention as you go through this week’s Update as Captain Christine has more than one eXtra special surprise gifts for all of you. 

So as our 4 year old granddaughter Blair likes to say “Let’s DO this!”.

Mr. Gee Goes Home!

IMG_20200817_112200Mr. Gee has garnered some of the most enthusiastic “fans” here on the blog, Facebook and Instagram so I guess I better lead with the star of this week’s title as we grant Mr. Gee his wish, and ours, to finally move into his new home aboard Möbius.

Let’s go back to the big day of Monday August 17th, 2020 when the move began…….
IMG_20200817_101544Mr. Gee’s “Mom”, aka Captain Christine was on hand to supervise and help out with the big move and the first order of business was to tear down the scaffolding and plastic that we had built around Mr. Gee for the past few months to help keep him clean and be able to extract all the overspray from painting him.
IMG_20200817_102909Uğur on the Left and Nihat left their aluminium work to help move Mr. Gee from my Workshop up on the first floor and down to the shop floor. 

You observant motor heads will notice that Mr. Gee is also now sporting his exhaust, intake and cooling water manifolds and has his massive flywheel all wrapped up inside his flywheel housing where his two hind feet attach.
IMG_20200817_104250With all this well fed help we were able to wrestle all 1200 Kg/ 2650 Lbs of Mr. Gee onto a sturdy wood pallet and used the pallet jack to push him out the Workshop door onto the balcony.  We are fortunate to have access to the big Yellow “praying Mantis” type crane truck which was able to shoe horn his way into a small slot beside the sailboat “Caledonia” which is inside the scaffold tent on the far Right and the smaller paint booth on the Left.

In the center background, Möbius is anxiously awaiting the arrival of her beau Mr. Gee and the big 20m catamaran “Twinity” is in the scaffolded tent on the far Left.
IMG_20200817_105921Taking our typical “belts & suspenders” approach, we double wrapped Mr. Gee with doubled up yellow webbing and then I added two additional Green/Red Dyneema lines which are many times the breaking strength of the webbing and tied all of that to Mr. Hook on the end of the crane which lifted Mr. Gee like he weighed nothing at all.
IMG_20200817_105959Captain Christine was filming all this action from the balcony on the opposite side and later told me that her heart was pounding in her throat throughout the whole lift off and could barely film for shaking.  Mr. Gee said he shared her concerns as he went over the edge of the balcony but it all went off without a hitch and Mr. Gee was soon flying through the air and heading home.
IMG_20200817_110642Uğur kept a steady and reassuring hand on Mr. Gee as they moved the crane truck …………
IMG_20200817_111024………. behind Möbius for Mr. Gee’s connecting flight to his final destination inside the Engine Room of Möbius.
IMG_20200817_111746Unlike E.T., Mr. Gee didn’t need a spaceship, just this equally amazing crane that makes moving equipment like this into tight spaces easy peasy as my Canadian friends might say.
IMG_20200817_111844It was a complex move as Naval has not yet built the sliding engine lift frame that will be used for any future needs to remove/replace Mr. Gee and his Nogva CPP Gearbox.  If you look closely you will see that while the big ER Hatch opens up more than enough space for the total length of Mr. Gee AND the Nogva CPP Gearbox as a single unit, more than half of that hatch opening is underneath the cantilevered aluminium roof that extends out overtop of the Outdoor Galley on the Aft Deck.  And just for one more level of difficulty, the ER Hatch is located between the two big Vent Boxes.
MVIMG_20200817_112157But these preying Mantis type cranes as I refer to them, was able to do all this in two simple steps. 

First lowering Mr. Gee into the aft end of the ER Hatch where we could use the chain block to drop him down further into the ER.
IMG_20200817_112839And then using its hydraulic extendable arms the crane could slide Mr. Gee forward to the front of the ER.
IMG_20200817_114108And we then lowered his four anxiously awaiting feet onto the beefy engine beds below.
IMG_20200817_114307Lots of work remains of course to make all the life support connections for Mr. Gee’s water, fuel, oil, etc., drop in and bolt on the Nogva CPP Gearbox and then align the pair precisely to the flange on the CPP propeller shaft but I am eXtremely delighted to finally be able to say;

Welcome Aboard and HOME Mr. Gee!!


But WAIT!!        There’s MORE!!!!

Here is the first Bonus Prize for all of you from Captain Christine who has been hard at work learning her newest video editing software and has put together this short video of Mr. Gee Goes Home. 

Hope you enjoyed that and please stay tuned as Captain Christine is just warming up her video editing chops for you.

NOGVA CPP GEARBOX:


IMG_20200817_114220For those who might be wondering, we did not attach the Red Nogva CPP Gearbox yet because I’ve been waiting for the spray booth to be available so I can paint him to match Mr. Gee’s Burgundy colour. 

So we took advantage of having the crane there to move the Nogva off the Aft Deck and down onto the shop floor by the paint booth.
IMG_20200817_122200Sadly, this brand new Nogva CPP Gearbox has been sitting onboard Möbius since last November for some reason and so he is pretty filthy from the accumulation of ten months of shipyard detritus and will need a thorough cleaning before I sand and paint him back to new condition and worthy of becoming Mr. Gee’s partner in propulsion of Möbius.

MORE WORK on Mr. Gee


IMG_20200819_161849My Workshop/Office at the shipyard certainly feels very empty now but is still a great place for me to continue work on all of Mr. Gee’s peripherals such as the 24V and hand starters, two 250Ah alternators, and the copper/bronze oil & water pipeworks you can see in the back Left here.
IMG_20200818_192415I have multiple workbenches setup including this sold woodworking bench I built in Germany back in 1983 and still serves me very well. 

This week I was able to finish assembling this beautiful bronze and brass engine oil cooler so I can mount that on Mr. Gee’s Starboard/Right side and get it connected to his oil and cooling water lines.
IMG_20200818_192431It is impossible for me to chose a favorite part of Mr. Gee but this bronze & brass beauty is right up there.  As you’ve seen in previous Progress Update posts I’ve been working on this for about a month now and have all the parts fully cleaned, sandblasted and wire wheeled to fully reveal their raw natural beauty.
IMG_20200821_101108Last week I coated them with two coats of clear polyurethane to keep them looking this way and now have it all assembled.  A relatively simple heat exchanger, sea water flows through the rectangular shaped cast bronze housing made from two halves bolted together in the middle as you see here. 
To better answer the questions I’ve received about how this works, cold Sea Water is pumped into the large copper pipe in the upper Right foreground in the photo above and then out the downward facing 90 degree elbow  in the Left background.


IMG_20200819_161239Engine oil is pumped in one end and out the other of this 1.5 meter/5 ft long “dimpled” brass tube which lives inside the rectangular bronze housing above with all that cool sea water flowing along its length extracting the heat from the engine oil into the sea water which is then pumped out through the Sea Chest.

The short lengths of copper tubing I’ve soldered onto the edges here are to keep this dimpled tube from sagging in the middle and keeping the water flow even.  There is also a sacrificial zinc anode laying in the bottom of the rectangular housing to look after the corrosive action of the slightly dissimilar brass/bronze/copper materials that make up this engine oil cooler/heat exchanger.
IMG_20200821_101117However I don’t think you need to understand how it works to appreciate the raw beauty of this beast which I can’t wait to show you bolted up to Mr. Gee’s Starboard side and perfectly contrasted with his Burgundy and Aluminium colours so stay tuned for that!

Gentlemen; Start Your Engine; Either Way you Want!

24 Volt Starter

IMG_20200822_143856With Mr. Gee now in his new home I have tried to pick up the pace on getting him up and running and for that you need a starter, or TWO in our case of course.  First starter is this beast of a 24V SL5 electric starter.  It seems to be in very good shape so I just want to take it apart enough to confirm that, give it a thorough clean and lube and replace any parts needed.

Removing the double nuts on the end of the shaft and the four lower through bolts allowed me to pull off this drive end of the starter and check out  all the critical components of the drive gear, bushings and clutch.
IMG_20200822_151427The other housing for the pack of clutch plates affixed to the drive shaft of the starter and the four tabs on the outer circumference of each clutch plate interlocks with the four slots in this outer housing.
IMG_20200822_151731I learned long ago in my early days of restoring antiques and other engines,  the value of taking LOTS of photos as I disassemble things for the first time and this is likely more detail than most of you would like but this is an example of how photos allow me to create my own parts and service manual by showing me clearly what all the parts are, what order and side they are assembled in, etc..
IMG_20200822_151737The clutch pack itself resides in the housing of the drive end that you saw me removing above.  You can see the four tabs around the outer circumference that engage in the housing above and then the matching set of inner tabs on every other clutch plate.
IMG_20200822_151830Five sets of clutch plates in all which are mounted on the inner bushing that slides along the brass drive gear you can see one end of inside the drive housing on the far Left.
IMG_20200822_152012Apologies for the poor focus but this is the whole brass drive gear which has the clutch plates mounted on the top end and the drive gear that engages with the large ring gear on the flywheel when you activate the starter and it turns Mr. Gee on so to speak. Winking smile
IMG_20200822_152220For those of you still hanging in there on this deep dive into Mr. Gee’s electric starter, let me show you a good example of why I love and respect these Gardner engines and why Christine and I are quite willing to literally put our lives in Mr. Gee’s hands.

What do you think this grub screw in the outer drive housing is for?

Took me a bit to figure out as well but the little coil spring is a good clue.
IMG_20200822_152226The light goes on when peering into the inside bore of the bushing and finding that long dark jelly bean shape on the Left is a thick piece of felt. 

Aha!  This is how you keep the starter’s bearing surfaces of the bronze drive shaft well lubricated with oil!  Once a year or so, remove that grub screw, squirt in a few drops of fresh oil and put the screw back in to keep the spring pushing the oil filled felt against the shaft.  Brilliant!

But wait!!!  There’s more!!!  Mr. Gee also has a

Hand Starter

OLD Gardner Hand Start Illustration Plate 10The original Gardner 6LXB had this optional HAND CRANK starting system and thanks to the great efforts of Michael Harrison and his staff at Gardner Marine Diesel in Canterbury England they were able to find all these original parts and that box full of Gardner Goodness arrived yesterday!
Gardner 6LXB restored w 1OLD Hand Crank completeTo help you visualise how this hand crank starter system works, this is a photo of a different 6LXB with the hand crank fully assembled.  As per the illustration above you can put the crank handle on either end of the engine and given our space constraints at the front we will put Mr. Gee’s hand crank handle on the rear.
IMG_20200821_185255Unpacking the three boxes from Gardner Marine Spare Parts revealed all these original bits of pure Gardner goodness that I need to build a full hand starting option to Mr. Gee.  It is actually going to be quite an engineering challenge that I won’t bore you with any more right now but I am busy designing a way of combining an old and a new version of the Gardner hand crank system that I’ll explain in future posts.
IMG_20200821_185308This is the chainwheel that goes on the crankshaft and the little spring loaded lever at 2 o’clock engages with a slotted pawl on the crankshaft which the hand crank turns via the chain you see at the top here. 

Enough of Gardner starters for now but for suffice it to say that for Christine and I this is an eXtremely important fail safe starting option for us to have on our single engine boat.

PLUMBING:

Alfa Laval Holding Tank

IMG_20200821_122251We were only able to have Cihan for a few hours this week but he was able to add this critical part, which is the waste water storage tank for the Alfa Laval MOB 303 Centrifugal Separator/Clarifier that we have on the Starboard/Right side of the Workshop beside the Day Tank.
Alfa Laval MIB-303 photoThese Alfa Laval MIB 303’s are found on pretty much all large commercial ships where they are used to fully clean and clarify anything from diesel fuel to engine and hydraulic oils.  They are regarded as the ultimate in fuel cleaning for their ability to take the most contaminated fluids and remove pretty much every bit of dirt, water and contaminates in a very short time.  Their only downside is that they are very eXpensive but through more of our typical serendipity and good friends we were able to get a slightly used one from a super yacht in St. Martin and now have it installed on Möbius.

The aluminium tank which Cihan mounted this week is the holding tank for all the dirt and water the MIB 303 removes and we just empty it after each use for disposal net time we dock.
Alfa Laval MIB 303 Functional principles of operationFor those interested in how these centrifugal separators work I will just leave you with the link above and these two illustrations of their basic functional principles.  Bottom line for us is that we can turn the dirtiest water filled fuel there is and turn it into crystal clear diesel fuel with NO consumable filters or other elements required.  Another eXtremely big deal for us and our remote use cases.
IMG_20200822_162717Cihan also got started on plumbing our Kabola KB45 diesel boiler/water heater.  Copper pipes on the Right side are for the two independent coils of water In/Out of the boiler and the stainless steel pipe above is for the exhaust gasses which connect to an insulated SS exhaust pipe that takes the hot exhaust air out through the hull.

ANTENNAE ARCH

IMG_20200817_163019Picking up where we left off last week, Uğur and Nihat finished their work fabricating and mounting the aluminium Antennae Arch and turned things over to the Electrical Team to start wiring this “antennae farm”.  This was very much a whole Team effort with Uğur and Nihat looking after all the aluminium work and then Yusuf, Hilmi and Samet doing all the wiring.
IMG_20200818_094952As you can see all the individual mounts are just tacked in place at this stage enough for us to put each antenna, light, camera, etc. in place and see how well the arrangement worked with regards to all their conflicting requirements and locations relative to each other.  Meeting the ideal parameters each one wants in terms of their position, height, distance from each other, orientation, etc. is a classic example of the compromises that go into boat design.  I would liken it to managing a birthday party for a group of young children; “I don’t want to sit beside HIM!”, “I want to be her”, “I want to be higher than that one”, etc.
IMG_20200818_094905But by trying out various combinations we finally settled on this arrangement, starting on the far Left:

  • AIS antenna for em-Trak Class A AIS
  • Furuno GPS puck
  • ACR remote control pan/tilt search light
  • 360 degree OGM 3NM Anchor light on top
  • 225 degree OGM 3NM Steaming Light
  • MikroTik Groove WiFi antenna
  • Furuno SC33 Satellite Compass
  • Airmar 220WX Weather Station
  • VHF Whip antenna (mostly hidden from view here)
  • FLIR M332 stabilized Marine Hi-def Thermal camera (night vision)
  • AIS antenna for Standard Horizon GX6000 VHF radio


IMG_20200818_144042With all the positions and heights finalized Uğur welded them all in place, Nihat cleaned up the welds and the Antennae Arch was ready to be taken up onto the Aft Deck to be welded onto the Main Arch.
IMG_20200818_171850After double checking the exact location where each of the four legs of the Antennae Arch would be welded to the Main Arch, Nihat cut in the large holes on each side where all the cables would pass through and put a nice smooth radius on all the edges.
IMG_20200818_175814The Antennae Arch we tacked in place and the two teams, Aluminium and Electrical, put their heads together to go over the cable routing and made sure the final location worked out for both the welding, wiring and mounting of each item on the Arch before Uğur welded it all in place.
IMG_20200819_094559Now each item could be mounted with all the proper gaskets, seals and cabling.
IMG_20200819_124052While all the items were being physically attached to the Antennae Arch Night cut the bottom cover plates that will seal in the underside area where all the cables pass through on the Main Arch and will then do the same for the Antennae Arch so that both areas stay clean and watertight from the elements.
IMG_20200820_092920The larger base of the Furuno FAR 1523 Radar gearbox bolts to the platform on top of the Main Arch and when flipped open as you see here, it also houses the first stage electronics for the Radar. 
The 20m/65ft cable has all the push/lock connectors preinstalled on both ends so it is very large in diameter and quite stiff so it needs to be installed and routed through the Main Arch tubes and all the way down to the Main Helm area.


MVIMG_20200820_093738That housing is all cast aluminium but with the large motor and all the electronics inside it still weighs 27 Kg/ 60 Lbs so Hilmi and the gang got a good workout carefully wrestling it in place on top of the Main Arch and routing the cable.
IMG_20200820_094105Even something as seemingly simple as these SS through bolts required special care and attention as they use special non grounding grommets with seals so you can not turn the bolts to tighten, only the nuts. 
IMG_20200820_094143But Yusuf, Uğur, Hilmi and Samet working together they soon had the FAR1523 mounted and ready for the 6.5ft open array radiator/antenna to be installed a bit later.
IMG_20200819_181710Over on the Port/Left side of the Main Arch the Standard Horizon loud hailer and the Wilson 4G wide band omni marine antennae have been mounted on the support strut for the paravane A-Frame and they are now ready to be wired as well.
IMG_20200821_095836With everything welded and mounted it was now time for Hilmi and Samet to take over and start chasing the miles of wire and cables down through the Arch tubes on either side and then down into their various destinations inside Möbius.  This is one set on the Starboard/Right side of the Arch where all the power based wiring goes to keep it well separated from all the data carrying cables which go down the tubes on the Port/Left side of the Arches.
IMG_20200822_161032The large hinge plates that allow the Main Arch to fold down, created a bit of a challenge as to how to safely and securely route all the cables in both the Up and Down positions of the Main Arch.  The idea they settled on was to run the wires as a bundle through this thick rubber hose and fit a fiberglass sealing flange to the upper hinge box.
IMG_20200822_162600Same kind of setup on the opposite Port/Left side of the Main Arch for all the data cables though it was a bit more challenging as it uses the aft most column which are closest to the hinge pin so a much tighter radius but no match for Hilmi and Samet who soon had it all looking like this.
MVIMG_20200822_165051Looking up from the shop floor I took this shot to put it all in better perspective for you as Hilmi and Samet start filling up that rubber hose with its wires and cables and getting it all stuffed inside the Arch tubes. 

Trust me, you will be seeing much more of Samet & Hilmi and all the wiring they have yet to do.

INTERIOR WIRING:

IMG_20200817_174031Earlier in the week Samet & Hilmi had been busy doing more of the wiring for AC and DC outlets throughout the interior of the boat.  They completed all the connections inside this Main DC box down in the Basement where all the high amperage cables, switches, shunts and bus bars connect the four House Battery Banks to their primary loads and distribute the DC power to the forward and aft DC Boxes in the Forepeak and Aft Workshop.
IMG_20200818_095843For lower amperage 12 and 24 Volt loads I’m using these neat little fused junction boxes throughout the boat, upper one here for 12V and lower for 24V.
IMG_20200818_095834This pair on the Starboard/Right side of the Workshop are mounted aft of the electrical junction box for the Delfin Watermaker.


IMG_20200818_095718You may have noticed in the photo above that they have also now mounted the AC receptacles for 120V and 230V at the bottom Left of the Watermaker box and these too are found throughout each compartment of Möbius.
IMG_20200817_174056Industrial style light switches are also now starting to appear throughout the non-living spaces such as this one you can see on the bottom Left of the stairs which turns on the LED lights in the ceiling of the Basement.

INTERIOR DETAILS:

IMG_20200819_094448Just a quick update for you on some of the various interior details which are now showing up such as these Ultra Leather cushions in the Dinette Settee.
IMG_20200819_123920The lighting does not do justice to the great smoky blue colour Christine picked out for these cushions so you’ll just have to wait until we launch and have proper sunshine coming in through all those windows but you get the idea.
IMG_20200819_182820Up above the Main Entrance doorway and stairs, Omur has been busy finishing the FastMount panels that go around those walls and ceiling.
IMG_20200820_103159Looking from the opposite direction when standing in the Entryway Door, Omur is measuring up the panel sizes for that Port/Left side wall panel and you can also see he has the removable L-shaped cover in the upper corner of the overhead Entryway.
IMG_20200820_122002This cover will soon be upholstered in matching Blue/Green leather and inside will be home to a bunch of electronics such as network switches, Axios video decoder, N2K multi-port blocks and connections for cables going into the SkyBridge Helm Station out of sight on the other side of the Right wall in this photo.
IMG_20200820_122423Down at the bottom of those stairs in the Corridor Office area, Omur is finishing the installation of those wall panels including the recently snapped in place leather covered panels underneath the marble countertop/ workbench.

Brrrrrrr, it’s Cccccccold inside!


IMG_20200821_120251I suspect that most of you can guess what’s going on here?


IMG_20200821_120626Correct!  The refrigeration company has arrived to look putting in the copper tubing for the remote mounted compressors for the pair of large upright Vitrifrigo door fridges and their matching pair of freezer drawers.
IMG_20200821_140445While Hilmi and Samet are busy lengthening all the wiring between the Fridge/Freezer units and the compressors, Omur is busy up on the Port side of the Galley putting in the extra 50mm / 2” of insulation that wraps around all 5 sides of each Fridge/Freezer.
IMG_20200821_140652Meanwhile, down in the Basement the refrigeration guys are busy mounting the four Danfoss compressors to this rack above the coffer dams.
IMG_20200821_151922Now the insulation wrapped copper lines coming out of each compressor down below, can be carefully routed up through their penetrations in the floor and in through the holes in the back of their respective cabinets ……..
IMG_20200821_163137……………….. where they can now be soldered onto the copper lines coming out of each Fridge/Freezer like this. 
IMG_20200821_172333Once soldered together these copper lines are wrapped in new EPDM foam insulation and carefully routed in the area behind each cabinet.  Enough extra length of copper tubing will be coiled up behind each unit to allow them to be pulled out in the future for any repairs or maintenance.
IMG_20200821_152205Here is a quick look in behind the Fridge cabinets to see how the insulated coper lines will be run along the sides and eventually zip tied to the cable trays once everything is all complete and working.  The backs of the cabinets will also be sealed to keep them air tight and have marine plywood backs installed.

Can’t wait to show you all these units fully installed next week.

DAVIT ARCH CONSTRUCTION BEGINS:

IMG_20200819_145730This stack of CNC aluminium plate showed up this week and can you guess what it will soon become?
IMG_20200821_100033The subtitle tells part of the story, the upper 20mm / 5/8” plate has all the CNC cut parts for the hinged mounting foundations for the Davit system which will bring the Tender On/Off of the Port/Left side of the Aft Deck and In/out of the water.


FYI; The rest of the CNC cut plates underneath are all the parts for our 5 meter/ 16/4 ft jet drive Tender!


IMG_20200821_130322But the Davit goes first and the this recently arrived stack of AL pipe will be used to construct the ladder style double tube Davit Arch.
Tender Davit double pipe arch YigitThis quick and dirty rendering of the Davit system shows how the overall system will work.  There will be two separate Raise/Lower systems both made using Dyneema line on 6:1 Garhauer blocks and clutches going to Lewmar winches.  One system will look after Raising/Lowering the Davit Arch itself and the second system will Raise/Lower the Tender from the Arch.
Tender Davit Arch multi position captureThis is the only rendering I have time to grab right now and it was from when Yigit and I were first designing and testing the Davit Arch model so much has changed since then such as the orientation of the laddered Davit Arch and the Tender design but it will help show how the Davit moves the Tender On/Off the Aft Deck.
The design of this Tender Davit System is the result of a LOT of prior experiences launching and retrieving dinghies and LOTS of thought and experimentation with these 3D models but I am VERY happy with the end result which I believe will be one of the safest, fault tolerant and easiest Davit systems we have ever known.  Stay tuned for the real world testing after launch to confirm all this really works!


IMG_20200821_100122Nihat and Uğur waste no time getting started and soon have the 50mm / 2” connector/ladder tubes all cut in the background and the extruded aluminium elbows cut at their final angles and chamfered edges for full penetration welding.
IMG_20200821_120827Our student intern Omer is really learning a lot and enjoying the whole experience of working with us on this new project as Uğur starts prepping the 20mm pieces he has removed from the CNC cut plate that will become the hinged bases for the Davit.
Davit 3 piece Joiner plates renderI designed the Davit Arch to be three independent parts so it will be easy for Christine and I to disassemble and store on the Aft Deck when we are in Hunkered Down or Canal mode with the whole SkyBridge roof lowered.  Simply done by putting in these double Blue 20mm joiner plated which will be bolted together.
IMG_20200821_140026Nihat has tacked two of those joiner plates together to keep make it easy to cut them to shape and now drill out the six bolt holes in each pair of joiner plates.
IMG_20200821_173149And he soon has all four joiner plates and the other hinge plates all drilled and edges radiused or chamfered for welding.
IMG_20200821_173104Simple yet very strong and effective construction allows Uğur to quickly tack up these two vertical legs of the Davit Arch.
IMG_20200821_173225KISS design continues with simple slots cut into the bottoms of each Davit Arch pipe where the hinge plates will be inserted and welded.
IMG_20200821_180925Like this.
IMG_20200821_181348Flipping the vertical legs upside down atop their joiner plates ….
IMG_20200821_181356…… makes it easy to align them and tack them in place.
IMG_20200821_173149And the two vertical legs are all tacked up and checked for alignment and ready for final welding.
IMG_20200822_103130Uğur begins the fabrication of the horizontal upper beam by laying out the angle where the elbows connect the angled 90mm / 3.5” pipes to the upper ladder beam.
IMG_20200822_160840Fabrication of this Upper Beam goes quickly with the KISS design.

Note that Uğur has inserted short lengths of inner reinforcing pipe to strengthen the joint between the angled pipes and the elbows.
IMG_20200822_160824Which end up looking like this.
IMG_20200822_160922And does the same thing at the other end of the short angled connecting pipes of the Upper Beam.
IMG_20200822_164913The fully assembled Davit Arch can now be tacked together.
IMG_20200822_164926Bottoms of the Arch pipes are closed off.
IMG_20200822_164542And now the whole assembly can be checked for perfect alignment and square and ready to be fully welded up and taken up to the Aft Deck next week.
And that’s another week gone by and hopefully another week closer to launching XPM78-01 Möbius.

Captain Christine has two more Bonus Gifts for all of you but I’m going to keep you waiting just a wee bit longer for those to post but I think you’ll agree that they are worth the wait.

In the meantime, I hope you enjoyed this week’s XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update and if you did or didn’t please let me know one way or the other and add any other comments or questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

See you here again next week,

-Wayne

Miss Möbius Tries to Runaway from Home! Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius Aug 10-15, 2020

Our first full 5 day work week for Team Möbius in a long time plus another full day for Hilmi and I yesterday (Saturday) so much more to share with you for this week’s Progress Update report.  Several new jobs began this week, new aluminium arrived, Mr. Gee got some much needed TLC and then we did have the “runaway” incident as per this week’s title. 

AND, compliments of Captain Christine there is a bonus surprise video embedded along the way below! 

So grab your favorite beverage and strap yourself into your comfy chair and let’s jump right into this week’s Show & Tell here at Naval Yachts.

Miss Möbius Tries to Runaway from Home!


IMG_20200812_135929Our little girl “Miss Möbius” has been growing up quickly over the past two years and based on her behavior this week I’m thinking that “boat years” must be like “dog years” as she seems to have become a teenager.  How else to explain that earlier this week she tried to make a run for the sea and run away from home?!?
IMG_20200812_135004

Or maybe, like her owners, she just got frustrated by the ever changing Launch Date? 

Or maybe her big Nose Cone sniffed the smell of the sea blowing through the shipyard with the big winds we had on Monday and decided to make a run for it? 


IMG_20200812_134923Whatever the reason she somehow had managed to conspire with her new best friend, 56 Wheeled Wanda, the second biggest boat mover in the Free Zone, to come pick her up and they were headed out the door when Captain Christine caught wind of their plan and tried to block them from leaving.
IMG_20200812_135121Alas, the barn doors were wide open and there was no stopping them and they were off and running for the sea.

OK, OK, just kidding. 


IMG_20200811_133746The real reason is that a big new refit and stretch job on a 36 meter/120 ft yacht is arriving at Naval on Tuesday and they need the entire length of the bay Möbius has been in so they needed to move us out and over to the opposite side of the shipyard.
IMG_20200811_133800We’ve been storing all the major equipment yet to be installed down on the floor underneath Möbius so that all had to be moved first.
IMG_20200812_100209Everyone pitched in and the forklift helped out and it was soon all clear below.
IMG_20200812_114233Uğur and Nihat put in four longer supports that went all the way up to the rub rails so they could cut off the shorter ones to give room for …………..
IMG_20200812_120057………..  52 Wheeled Wanda to slid her two rails full of hydraulic jack stands all the way under the anxiously awaiting Miss Möbius.
IMG_20200812_121342Each dual set of wheels have one set of hydraulic cylinders that can turn them to a very steep angle that allows them to move the boat sideways.
IMG_20200812_135132Every other set of axels have their own hydraulic drive motors built into their hub to power the wheels forward or back.  The two side rails are locked together using the big cross tie rails you can see here.
IMG_20200812_134934The whole boat mover is completely self contained and this single diesel motor powers a very large hydraulic pump pushing high pressure hydraulic fluid down all those steel lines you see extending down the upper area of the side rails.
IMG_20200812_140751And all this is run by a radio remote control unit that you can see hanging from the neck of Wanda’s operator standing on the left of Nihat here.

IMG_20200812_160134And just like that, the whole bay is now empty and ready to be VERY fully filled up with the new 36 meter job to take its place this coming week.
IMG_20200812_142020We couldn’t stop Miss Möbius entirely but we were able to thwart her escape and redirect her back into the shipyard two bays over and what should be her new home until it really is time to have Wanda help us take the fully finished Möbius to the sea!

Now the moving process is reversed and the steel stands are moved back in place under the length of the central Keel Bar to support Miss Möbius so that Wanda can set her down and leave.
IMG_20200812_155358The side stands are welded back in place and the concrete floor is drilled for long steel pins and lag bolts to keep her upright.

And we can say “Bye Bye, See you soon” to Wanda until we need her again on Launch Day.
IMG_20200812_155934Möbius’ new “bay mate” is “Twinity”, a 20 meter/ 65 ft catamaran who’s height and width make Möbius look positively diminutive but she’s the Just Right size for us.
MVIMG_20200812_161808For some perspective and sense of scale I shot this photo looking the length of the shipyard from one floor up in my Workshop.  Möbius used to be in the empty bay on the very far Right here and now sits in the background by the big bay doors.  the other ship tented in plastic in the foreground is “Caledonia” an all steel sailboat that should have her launch date next month sometime.
IMG_20200813_100357Up on Möbius for the first time in her new home, we hope that she is a bit more content with her big nose cone as close to the doors as possible so she can keep enjoying those fresh breezes blowing in from the launch harbour a few block away.  And hopefully no more than a few months away!!!!

But Wait!!!!            There’s more!!!!

We have heard all your many requests to have more video content of this whole process and so Captain Christine has been spending a lot of time in the past month getting up to speed on some new video editing software she really likes and she will be using this to create some more video for us to post here with all the “spare time” she has between the 7 day work weeks we are both logging to try to get Möbius finished and launched.

We both did our best to shoot some video of Moving Möbius and so here is a time lapse video Christine just put together.  Hope you enjoy it.


Antennae Arch

IMG_20200811_165635New aluminium arrivals mean new jobs so can you guess what this pile of pipe is for?

Two new jobs actually, first as you’re about to see is building the new “mini arch” or Antennae Arch that sets atop of the Main Arch to provide a “roll bar” kind of protection around the 2m/6.5’ open array Furuno FAR1523 Radar antennae and also provide all the real estate for the myriad of different antennae, GPS, weather station, satellite compass, search light, etc..
IMG_20200814_170152With all the various roles I’ve taken on for the build in the past few months, time is in limited supply so I just created this quick hand sketch of the design I came up with for the new Antennae Arch and the critical placement of each bit of kit that mounts on it. 


Antennae Arch list of equipmentI’m not sure how legible this will be (click to enlarge) but here is the list of each numbered item on the Antennae Arch.


Designing this Antennae Arch and the placement of each item is perhaps one of the best examples of how much compromise is a big part of design in that almost every one of these items has its own quite strict set of requirements for placement relative to how high it is, how much above/below its neighbors, how close to centerline, etc.  Of course most of them would like to be an “only child” and be the highest of them all with no one else nearby so you quickly realise that you just have to prioritise each item’s requirements and then do a triage type process of putting each item in the best position possible. 

Christine and I spent two days putting our heads together to come up with this eventual layout and I’m sure it could be improved upon even further but we think this is at least good enough for now and we will see how it all works in the real world once we launch and start using all this equipment and we can make changes from there.  We’ve had a list for what we call “Rev 2” and “Rev 3” with the changes or improvements we would like to make in the coming years so we’ll just add these to those lists.


IMG_20200813_093940Once they had Möbius moved Nihat and Uğur dove right into that pile of pipes and elbows and started to build the Antennae Arch. 
IMG_20200813_094015The elbows needed to be altered a bit as the angle of the corner of the arch is greater than 90 degrees so that’s what Nihat is up to here.
IMG_20200813_132807The ends of each pipe and elbow are bevelled to create a deep V for maximum penetration of the weld and then tacked in place.
IMG_20200813_132818The first of the dual mini arches that will be built to match the Main Arch they will be welded to the top of.
IMG_20200813_171018Like this.  We are using this ladder type construction in several places on Möbius; the Main Arch as you have seen for a long time and now this mini-arch that goes on top and soon you will see this same construction on the second new job that some of this new aluminium pipe is for, but I’ll keep that for next week.


IMG_20200814_101355We went back and forth on whether to just have the interconnecting ladder pipes all the way across the top or to put in a solid plate and decided that the plate was best as it creates a well protected wire chase to run all the many  wires and co-ax cables from all the antennae and other equipment.
IMG_20200814_121831Uğur has framed in the bottom for two plates that will be bolted and sealed in place to help protect the wiring further.
IMG_20200814_163823And here is the completed Antennae Arch.
IMG_20200814_170133Yusuf on the far Left, Nihat and Uğur and I then put our heads together to work out the details of all the different mounts that need to be created for each item on the Antennae Arch.
IMG_20200814_185903With so many different antennae and items to be mounted on this Arch, the numbering of each item was very helpful to keep them all straight and provide an easy shorthand for what was what.  This is where we finished up on Friday so I will show you the whole antennae farm next week.

Nogva CPP Propeller Blades

While everyone else was busy prepping to move Möbius I took on the other job that needed to be done before the move which was to reassemble the Nogva CPP propeller blades. 
Nogva CPP removal hole in rudderYou may recall from previous posts many months ago that we removed the CPP (Controllable Pitch Propeller) blades and hub when we were cutting the hole in the Rudder that enables us to remove the whole prop shaft without having to remove the Rudder.
Nogva CPP hub disassembledNow the whole CPP propeller hub & blades needed to be reassembled now which is a fairly straightforward process as these CPP mechanisms are eXtremely simple but they are also very high precision fit and have critical rubber O-ring seals that need to be put in place just right.
Nogva prop blades removedEach of the four prop blades are a single piece CNC milled from a solid billet of special bronze alloy which weigh about 20kg/45 lbs so they are a bit unwieldly to handle and get them to slide into the high tolerance fit into the hub.
IMG_20200811_151915Like this.
IMG_20200811_151935Uğur helped me in the beginning until he had to go look after moving Möbius so we thoroughly cleaned each part, put on a lots of new grease.
IMG_20200811_151946Fortunately, there were two excellent student interns working at Naval this past month, Omer on the Left and Alp on the Right, and they were eager to learn about how CPP props work so they joined in and helped wrestle each very slippery and heavy prop blade into position.
IMG_20200811_163533If you look closely in the photos above (click to enlarge any photo) you can see that each prop blade fits into a slot in the hub so they can’t fall out and will stay in place once they have been fully slid into place.  Then the hub end can be slid in place to capture the other half of each blade and this is then torqued down with some thread locker on each of the 8 bolts.
IMG_20200811_163521And Voila!  Miss Möbius has her CPP prop all good to go.
IMG_20200811_163546Viewed from the forward side looking aft you can see how there prop shaft itself is fully enclosed within the outer aluminium collar with the holes in it which thus prevents any errant ropes or fishing nets from wrapping around the prop shaft.  The holes are where the water injected into the far forward end of the prop shaft exits back to the sea and keeps the prop shaft fully protected by fresh seawater inside the prop shaft log tube.

Kobelt Hydraulic Steering Oil Tanks

IMG_20200810_181444Last week we covered Uğur and Nihat building the two header tanks for the hydraulic oil supply to the Kobelt steering pumps.

This is the larger of the two tanks which I designed to hold about 52L/14 USG of oil to keep these two Accu-Steer HPU400 auto pilot pumps well fed and I was able to design it to fit just perfectly into the space above these pumps.
IMG_20200810_181449This is a combination sight gauge and thermometer that makes it quick and easy to check the temperature and level of the hydraulic oil inside.
IMG_20200810_181505And we recessed this filler pipe and vent cap into the wall on the hinge side of the Watertight door from the Swim Platform into the Workshop so it is easy to access but not in your way as you walk in and out.
IMG_20200810_181858This is the small little 1.5 liter header tank on the Left that keeps the bronze Kobelt manual steering pump on the Right full of hydraulic oil.
IMG_20200815_104543I was able to design this tank to fit nicely into the space underneath of the Main Helm Dashboard which hinges up out of the way for access and Cihan soon had this tank all mounted and plumbed into the Kobelt hydraulic system.

PLUMBING:

IMG_20200813_095718Speaking of our head Plumber Cihan, he was back on Team Möbius this week thankfully and was busy installing several other systems on Möbius including the equipment for the shower on the Swim Platform.
IMG_20200813_095712Christine had picked up this very high quality bronze mixing valve at Ikea and Cihan soon had fabricated a bracket and mounted it up above the top of the Haz Mat locker where it will be super easy to access when needed yet well protected from the elements when not in use. 
IMG_20200813_095709Next week he will finish plumbing the Red/Blue Hot/Cold PEX water lines and the hand held shower wand.  The large White wrapped hose is the supply for the Fire Hose that will also live here inside the Haz Mat locker.
IMG_20200810_181640These long delayed Whale Gulper 220 Grey Water pumps finally arrived so Cihan was busy installing one of them in the Forepeak and one in the Basement where they will be used to pump out the contents of the Grey Water tanks to the exiting Sea Chests. 
NOTE:  In practice we don’t use these very much as we almost always let the Grey Water from showers and sink drains go straight back to sea but when we do use the GW tanks in a marina for example, these pumps let us empty them next time we are out at sea.


IMG_20200810_181717Cihan also had time this past week to finish plumbing both of the VacuFlush toilets.  This one is in the Guest Head and is now fully plumbed for the Fresh Water flushing water and supply water for the Bidet as well as the exiting Black Water.
IMG_20200810_182053Ditto for this one in the Master Cabin Head. 

These are both quite exciting milestones for Christine and me as they represent a new stage of the build as we move into such finishing work.
IMG_20200811_133017And just outside the Master Head the pièce de résistance of Cihan’s work this past week was the installation of this bit of beauty; our Vanity Sink at the very front end of our Master Cabin.
IMG_20200811_133025This unique sink is made from a solid clear glass casting which then has a iridescent coating of these beautiful blues.  The drain cap is still wrapped in its protective film so it is normally adding its glimmering polished stainless steel glow to the whole look.
IMG_20200811_133035And we think this faucet we found is equally unique and the perfect Goldilocks match for the sink it supplies.

There is a matching rectangular version of this sink and faucet in the Main Head/Bathroom where the all White walls create a complimentary yet different look.  Can’t wait to see and share that with you in the next week or so once the Corian countertop is installed in the Head.

INTERIOR WORK:


IMG_20200810_182044Back on the other side of the Vanity Sink the White gelcoat cabinetry is also getting closer to being finished.  Bottom doors are now mounted on the Blum hinges and the countertop awaits the Corian that we hope will arrive in the next week or so. 

The removable Teak floors for this Head and Shower as well as the Guest Shower are being finished up as well so I hope to be able to show you them being installed next week.
IMG_20200811_130604Moving Aft to show you the recent progress in the Corridor which connects to the Guest Cabin off to the Left outside of this photo and then through the WT door into the Workshop and Engine Room in the upper Left background.

The area on the Port/Left Hull on the far Right of this photo will be my Office and “clean room” workbench which now has this gorgeous hunk of Turkish quarried Turquoise marble now in place.  We ended up with a double order of this fabulous marble so I decided to use some of it in place of the Corian countertop we had originally specified.  Should make an eXcellent working surface for me with plenty of storage drawers and cupboards above and below.


IMG_20200811_130627Seen from the other end just inside the WT Workshop door, you can see the large Aft Electrical panel full of circuit breakers for all four voltages; 12 & 24VDC and 120 & 230VAC is on the far Left side of the stairs leading up to the Galley and SuperSalon.  This electrical panel will eventually be enclosed with an large labelled front panel and a hinged Rosewood and glass door.
IMG_20200812_100651Upstairs looking Aft at the Galley, Omur has continued his relentless work to complete all the Rosewood cabinetry throughout Möbius. 
IMG_20200812_100712In front of the Galley our Dinette Settee is also nearing completion.  Next up will be building and installing the large table here.  That will be fun to show you as it moves in all three axis; Up/Down Z axis as well as fore/aft X axis and side to side Y axis as well as able to be rotated in any of these positions. 
Might sound excessive but it is “little details” like this which add so much joy to our lives when we are able to get things like table height and position just right, just for us as we use this table for everything from our main dining table, an office table for the two of us, a coffee table when relaxing and a bed when we have more guests than our cabins can sleep.


IMG_20200812_100704If you can see through the clutter of the work going on here you can see how this forward end of the SuperSalon is also starting to take shape.  The large Rosewood slotted panel on the far Left will be hinged inside the opening behind it where the 50” SmarTV mounts. 
Helm Chair goes in the center of the Main Helm where all those wires are being tamed and then the stairs down the Master Cabin on the far Right.


ELECTRIC & ELECTRONICS:


IMG_20200815_104713As you can see, Hilmi has also been making good progress with his electrical work at the Main Helm.  This week he and Selim have been busy wiring up the switch panel on the angled wall above the Forward Electrical Panel as well as the various controls mounted in the Dashboard of the Main Helm.
IMG_20200815_104701The Furuno 711C AutoPilot control head is under that Gray protective cover in the center of the Dashboard with the Jog Lever to its Right and then the dual Kobelt control levers for Throttle and CPP Pitch on the far Right with the round Prop Pitch gauge above.  Maxwell windlass control above the Jog Lever and the empty hole soon to be filled with the Vetus Bow Thruster joystick and the ACR Pan/Tilt searchlight in the upper Right corner.
MVIMG_20200815_155106Lifting up the hinged Dashboard reveals more of Hilmi’s work as he starts to connect all those items as well as filling the Grey wire chases with the many wires that need to traverse from one side of the Main Helm to the other.
IMG_20200815_155257This “handkerchief” triangular storage area is on the Port/Left side of the Main Helm with a matching on on the opposite side.  We intend to use this one for a central Charging Station for the growing list of wireless electrical items that need charging.  
IMG_20200815_155252The two black panels you see in the back of this storage area are blocks of fused 12 & 24 VDC connections using Anderson PowerPole connectors to give us a single standard for all our 12 & 24 volt connections.

The rectangular hole is for the 120 & 230VAC receptacles.

 
IMG_20200810_181936More progress inside and behind this Forward Electrical Panel on the Right side of the Main Helm with the addition of the white mounted shunt, one of three, which is required for measuring current amps in this panel.
IMG_20200812_100406Above the Fwd Electrical Panel Hilmi and Selim completed most of the wiring of the switchboards up on this angled top.
IMG_20200812_100412The underside of the lower switch board shows the ready access to all this wiring.
IMG_20200812_100432Top side shows the layout of all these switches.  They are divided into the upper12 switches that control the High Water evacuation system which we hope we never need to use but is in just the right place here at Command Central if we ever do need it.

The bottom set of switches are for the exterior lighting and the labels should make that all self explanatory.

The uppermost switch panel has all the switches for controlling the Kobelt steering and propulsion equipment.
MVIMG_20200812_180016To the untrained eye this may still look like a Medusa hairdoo but for those who have been following along and know wiring this is a “Beautiful Mess”!


IMG_20200812_180001Still in the early stages of wiring all these switches but Hilmi’s skills and attention to detail is already emerging on these two switch panels.
IMG_20200812_180051Always a Team effort so Omur installed this multi pin socket into the top of this Rosewood switch panel where the Kobelt WalkAbout handheld remote control plugs in.  A metal cap threads onto this socket when not in use.
IMG_20200812_180048For a much more finished look, rather than install this receptacle from the top we decided to have Omur recess it in from the bottom with this mortise. 
IMG_20200815_104451This will give you an early idea of how these three switch plates will look in the end.
IMG_20200812_114134And finishing up with this weeks electrical progress, the aft depth sounder has now been mounted inside the aluminium fairing block you saw Uğur making and welding in place a few weeks ago.  This is the Airmar 600 Watt 520-5PSD transducer which provides the raw data of the bottom below us to the Furuno BBDS1 Bottom Discriminating sounder which gives us detailed graphics of the contours and material below us.


IMG_20200811_131003Uğur and Nihat were also able to get to this small but important job of providing external access to the inside of this Port/Left side Vent Box on the Aft Deck.  The White plastic fitting below its mounting hole provides an easy to remove but fully sealed opening that I can reach through to ……
IMG_20200811_130956…… access this shut off air damper on the Air Supply into the Engine Room.  Normally this shut off is fully automated and controlled by an thermostatic switch that closes this damper when the engine is off or if there were to ever be a fire in the Engine Room.  However in case this electrically automated motor should fail, you can activate this damper manually.
IMG_20200811_131010Peering down the 3 meter rectangular supply air duct into the Engine room to show where this damper is bolted to the top.

Same damper setup is on the opposite side Vent Box for shutting off the Exhaust Air extraction vent.

Putting Humpty Dumpty (aka Mr. Gee) Back Together Again!

Another exciting milestone this week was that I finally started to put all of Mr. Gee’s bits and bobs back together again.  After many months of doing all the prep work of cleaning, replacing, rebuilding, painting , etc. I was finally able to start actually assembling all those parts and putting Mr. Gee back together again in his better than factory new condition.

I know this is not of interest to many of you so feel free to skip ahead to the end while I take the others on a quick tour of Mr. Gee’s transition.

IMG_20200810_200741As you can see Mr. Gee is now all painted in his final colours of Burgundy Red for all the cast iron parts and silicone based aluminium paint for all the cast aluminium parts.
IMG_20200810_163411This past week I was able to tackle the next metal parts; all the copper and bronze pipework which transports all of Mr. Gee’s  the coolant water and oil to where it needs to go.

As you can perhaps tell from this photo I started by using paint removing gel and then sandblasting all these parts thoroughly to remove the almost 50 years of accumulated paint, grease, oil and dirt.
IMG_20200810_163403I considered going with the quite nice matt lustre left from the fine sandblasting sand but after some experimentation I decided that a brighter look left from wire wheeling the copper and brass, which you can see the beginnings of here, was more in keeping with the finished look I thought most befitting of Mr. Gee and Möbius’ Engine Room.
IMG_20200810_163356So I brought out my full compliment of WMD’s, Weapons of Mass Denuding, including wire wheels of various sizes in my angle grinder, benchtop grinder and Dremel tool and spent several days and knights bringing all these copper pipes and their bronze end fittings to an even bright lustre. 
IMG_20200810_200838Keeping this beautiful bright look was the next challenge as copper, brass and bronze all tend to oxidize quite quickly and loose this look.
IMG_20200810_200758So I cleaned them all up with acetone to remove all the leftover grime from wire wheeling and my fingerprints, hung them all from poles spanning the ceiling of the paint booth I had created and sprayed them with 2 separate coasts of clear AlexSeal polyurethane which I have had great success with for many years.
IMG_20200810_200803The photos fail to capture how great this clear coat worked but I am eXtremely pleased with both the look and how well protected these surfaces all are now and for the next few decades.
IMG_20200810_200830If you were here last week you might remember that I had given Mr. Gee himself two coats of the same clear polyurethane so he too is now very nicely all plastic coated. 
IMG_20200812_185451While much of this is just cosmetic there is a very real pragmatic benefit I’ve found with having such surfaces on my engines and mechanical parts which is that I can see any leaks or even loosening nuts SO much sooner and these surfaces are all SO much easier to keep clean so I was quite willing to put in all this extra time, effort and expense. 
IMG_20200812_185458Plus, quite frankly, Mr. Gee and me are worth it! Winking smile
IMG_20200813_110640A few weeks ago I had found the time to clean and paint Mr. Gee’s massive, almost 150 Kg flywheel so I had Uğur lift it up to my Workshop using the forklift
IMG_20200813_110647Where I could then use my handy dandy 2 ton hydraulic lift to finally install the flywheel on the end of the crankshaft.
IMG_20200813_211015Which in turn let me bolt the outer flywheel housing onto Mr. Gee.


IMG_20200813_123649Next week we will move Mr. Gee onto the Aft Deck of Möbius where I can then bolt the Nogva CPP Gearbox to the SAE1 flywheel housing to complete the full propulsion package.  You can see the SAE14 flange I have now bolted to the flywheel and each of those inner semi cylindrical cogs will mate with the rubber drive ring on the Nogva Gearbox.


IMG_20200813_211010When I was cleaning and painting the flywheel I masked off the six sets of markings on the outer circumference of the flywheel and now you can see why. 
This little window on the top of the flywheel housing allows me to precisely set Mr. Gee to TDC (Top Dead Center) for each cylinder which you need to do to set the exact timing of the open/close of the valves and the timing and advance of the fuel injection.


IMG_20200814_163043Now the fun begins as I carefully remove all the masking taped areas and started installing things like the two cast aluminium valve covers, upper cast aluminium water manifolds on each cylinder head and the single manifold on the bottom of the cylinder block.
IMG_20200814_182853Followed by the Intake and Exhaust manifolds on this same Starboard/Right side of Mr. Gee.
IMG_20200815_180259Test fitting the dual thermostat housing on the end of the front water manifold and the coolant header tank.
IMG_20200815_180237Next week I hope to start populating this Port/Left side with all its gear including the whole fuel pump and injection system which mounts to those two circular clamps you see here. 
BTW, for those who would find it interesting, this is Mr. Gee’s “service side” where you do most of the day to day work when starting and maintaining him as this is where things like the decompression levers, fuel priming levers, water pump, fuel pump, oil dipstick, temperature and pressure gauges for oil and coolant, etc.  Hence this is the side where I located the door into the Engine room and have the most access on this side as you will soon see when we mount Mr. Gee into his new home and Engine Room.

If you made it this far I hope you took my advise to get a good beverage and comfy seat or you stopped along the way to do so.  I really do appreciate you taking the time to follow along and join Christine and I on this latest adventure and we both look forward to getting your feedback with the questions and comments you put in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

See you again next week I hope.

-Wayne