Möbius on the Move Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius April 19-23, 2021

Moving is the theme for this week, and more next week all of which is a VERY good thing!  Albeit eXtremely short trips, literally a couple of hundred yards each, they still represent movement both progress wise and boat wise so it is all good.  When I left you last week we had just moved onto one of the many brand new concrete docks not far from the infamous “end wall” dock inside the Free Zone Harbour where we have tied up several times in the past few months since we splashed on Feb. 20th but they had another big cargo ship coming into the port here so all of us tied up on the end wall needed to move to other locations so the Big Guys could come and go.  I’ll show you more of that in a moment. 

The other even more eXciting moves, yes plural, are hopefullly happening this coming week.  On Tuesday we will be moving Möbius out of the Free Zone harbour for the last time and taking her around the corner to Setur Marina where she will officially begin her life as XPM78-01 Möbius.  Not sure how long we will be there, basically as long as it takes for Christine and I to get her fully seaworthy and ready to cut the dock lines and head out to sea.  I will chronicle all of that here in future weekly Progress Updates so you will get to see what all is involved as it happens. 

IMG_20210419_070018But WAIT!  There’s MORE!!!  What could possibly top having Möbius start her own life with us?  Easy, because the other big “move” which I am even more eXcited about is that my Beautiful Bride, aka Captain Christine flies back into my arms on Thursday night!  She’s been away in Florida having a whirlwind of a time with all her family and friends back there in the Fort Lauderdale area and especially enjoying her much needed Gramma time with our grandson Liam.  So it’s been great for her to get away from this non-stop boat work, and even more so jettison out of “Wayne’s World” for two weeks but I miss her terribly and can’t wait to meet her coming out the exit doors at AYT, Antalya Intnl Airport on Thursday.


And as you can see, I’m not the only one who has been missing the Captain.


IMG_20210419_070044For those who may not have met them yet, Ruby the Wonderdog is the mass of Black curls on the Left and Barney, aka The Barnes, our Yorkshire Terror at her side.  Other than the past 3 years while we’ve been dirt dwellers during the build of Möbius, both of these guys have spent all their lives on boats, and a fair number of planes, trains and automobiles.  14 years worth for Ruby and 9 for Barney so they have a LOT of miles under their paws and more to come soon.

So it is easy to see why “moving” is the theme this week and next and now let’s move on to Showing & Telling you more about all the moves and other progress here on the Good Ship Möbius during the week that was April 19-23, 2021.


Commissioning Continues

IMG_20210423_122621As with most posts for the past two months, the primary activity aboard Möbius is the commissioning of all the many bits of kit that make up our many systems. 
Not too eXciting to watch quite frankly but eXtremely important to do and get everything right, working and tested.  Sometimes we do this virtually, with the technician from the manufacturer coming aboard via the internet and truly eXciting scenes like this one!
IMG_20210423_122607Ismail, our electrician, and I are talking with Alex from Victron who is in his office in Istanbul and we have him patched in via a shared desktop on my laptop on the Left which is in turn connected by ethernet cable to the Victron network aboard Möbius, and via WhatsApp on my smaller computer for text and voice. 
Together we are able to run and test all the Victron equipment such as the 5 MultiPlus Inverter/Chargers, Isolation Transformer, MPPT controllers and so on.  Took us about 5 hours but we were able to get everything configured and they are now all good to go.


IMG_20210422_150228Similar virtual commissioning going on with our Kabola KB45 diesel boiler, though it was not so cooperative and we still have more to do to finish the commissioning and testing so we can finally have hot water aboard!
IMG_20210421_172609Part of the remaining work with the Kabola is getting this Grundfos Alpha2 circulation pump installed, filled with antifreeze solution and bled.  This circulates the hot water for one of the heat exchangers which transfer their heat to our domestic hot water.
IMG_20210420_113048Commissioning also often involves some good Houdini skills such as Ismail up on top is demonstrating as they try to get the Kabola lifted up and put into it AL frame bolted to the Workshop shelf it lives on.

Mr. Gee gits ‘er dun!

IMG_20210419_160453While he is ailing and I have not had a spare moment to investigate the cause of his sudden loss of oil pressure on the first sea trials a few weeks ago, Mr. Gee was able to power the move here within the Free Zone harbour with no problem. 

This was Mr. Gee’s oil pressure at start-up, right around 30 PSI, which for a Gardner is not much below the 38 PSI he normally runs at, however as the oil warms up it drops down to around 20 PSI so there is definately something very wrong that I need to get to the bottom of as soon as we are over in Setur Marina and I can make the time to start digging into the source of the problem. 
Unfortunately I am relatively certain that I know what the problem is and it is not good news nor a quick fix.   But I will leave all that  until I have time to find out for sure what’s going on which means a significant dismantling I’m sure.  Stay tuned for more on all that starting next week.

New Neighbors and Neighborhood

Free Zone   Setur Google Earth labelledYou may recall seeing this birds eye view from the last move we did from Setur over to the Free Zone harbour and this aerial view of the Free Zone Harbour on the bottom Left and Setur Marina on the bottom Right will give you a bester sense of the move this week. 

Last week were at position #1 on the End Dock Wall and this week we are now back over at position #2 where we were about a month ago.

Next week’s move has us going from #2 over to #3 in Setur although we don’t know just where we will be in Setur just yet.
IMG_20210419_165233We are Med Moored in our new home this week, which means there are lines off our Bow as you can see here, which extend out to a massive weight at the bottom of the harbour with all these lines firmly attached.  On your way in, you pick up the float that is on the end of one of these lines and bring it aboard while you back down with your stern to the dock.
IMG_20210424_103840Like this.  It takes a bit of getting used to this style of docking but the key advantage, at least to the marina, is that each boat only takes up its width on the dock rather than its length if you were to be side tied.  So you can have a LOT more boats docked on any given length of dock.  This is the norm in the Mediterranean and hence the name Med Mooring.
IMG_20210424_103858If you look closely at the bottom of this photo you will see how we are able to use our swim ladder for a passerelle or “gang plank” for getting on/off the boat.  You can’t really see it but there are massive black rubber fenders or bumpers all along the edge of the concrete dock and that’s what the end of the now horizontal swim ladder rests on.  Works well and makes getting on/off the boat quite quick and easy.
IMG_20210424_103912This is our new Starboard side neighbor, a brand new Bering 77 “Veronika” which just launched.  There was some good press coverage of the launch that you can see HERE if you’re interested in knowing more.
IMG_20210415_140511If this boat looks vaguely familiar, there is a good reason for that as you saw this boat two weeks ago when I was showing you the “Launch Fest” going on here when the new 560 Ton TraveLift started working after more then 4 months with no launching capabilities here.
IMG_20210415_140645Based on hull length, Veronika is just one foot less than Möbius at 78 feet, however these shots are a great example of how length of any boat tells you so very little about the boat itself or provides any real comparison.  This is a much more traditional “Trawler” and so you can perhaps understand why I hesitate when people ask me if an XPM such as our XPM78-01 Möbius is a Trawler?


For a quick comparison, Veronika’s basic measurements first followed by those of Möbius:

  • Displacement:     165 metric tons vs Möbius’ 45
  • Beam:                    7.3m/24 ft vs 5.0m/16.4 ft
  • Cruise Speed:       8 kts vs 10-11 kts
  • Range:                    4000nm vs 8000
  • Accommodation:    6cabins, 6heads + up to 4crew vs Möbius 2cabins, 2 heads and no crew thanks very much.


IMG_20210424_103943Take a moment to study the differences between Möbius and Veronika and you will quickly see that other than being about the same length, they share almost nothing else in comparison.

You can find the whole set of specs on the Bering 77 HERE if you’d like to learn more and see more photos.
IMG_20210424_104047Just so we are clear, it is not a question of which one is “best”, they both are, just depends on your use cases and taste.  There’s a boat out there for everyone and every use case.  We are just SO eXcited that thanks to Dennis at Artnautica and everyone at Naval Yachts  we now have our Goldilocks Just Right, Just  for Us, boat!
And that’s a wrap for this past week folks.  Lots of activity, just not much visual results to show you but hope you continue to enjoy coming along on this ride with us and that you will be back again for more next week.

In the meantime, please do leave any and all questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  While I am atrociously behind in responding to your most recent comments, they add a HUGE value to this blog and for Christine and myself and I am eXtremely appreciative of each one so thanks for that!

-Wayne

TLC for TENDER to XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update week of 08-13 March 2021

The weather here in Antalya has continued to be absolutely spectacular with a daytime high on Thursday of 22C/72F!  We did have some strong winds for 2 days this past week but they only served to make the views even more awemazing as they made the air crystal clear and the views of our surrounding snow capped mountains and the Mediterranean just popped visually and keeps smiles on our faces all day long and then the night sky has been just as brilliant.

While it was another eXtremely busy 24/7 week for all of us on Team Möbius there isn’t as much for this week’s Show & Tell as much of our work has been troubleshooting and commissioning of systems which doesn’t get captured too well by a camera.  We are also still working our way through a number of veXing system installation and commissioning issues including controls for our steering, throttle and CPP Pitch and so Möbius is not yet able to move under her own power and so the first of many sea trials is yet to happen but hopefully this coming week.

Nevertheless there is still lots of progress to share with you and so let’s just dive right and catch up on all the progress that happened this past week of 8-13 March, 2021.

More Lovely Days in the Neighborhood

PXL_20210314_063411015We continue to be delighted and entertained by the new neighborhood we have been floating in on the end concrete wall of the harbour inside the Free Zone.  However yesterday they towed us off the end wall and moved us over to one of the side walls of the harbour and put us right in front of this Green Monster “Aqua Helix”. 

with a LOA of 24m and Beam of 5m we thought Möbius was long and skinny with a Length to Beam ratio of 4.8.  But as you can see by this bow on shot, we don’t hold a candle to this little green fella which was built by the Damen boatyard beside us sporting a LOA of 73.4m and Beam of 11m which works out to a L/B ratio of 6.67.
Damen Aqua Helix overview illustrations
You can check out all the numbers and details on this FCS 7011 Crew Transfer vessel “Aqua Helix” HERE on this very well done overview from Damen Shipyards.


PXL_20210314_063340842Captain Christine has made sure that we are comfortably clear of our very nearby new neighbor as we get an up close and personal chance to get to know this amazing boat. 


*  As per the brochure I linked to above, Aqua Helix is a Crew Transfer boat for wind and solar farms as well as oil drilling rigs and other situations where there are people living and working miles off shore and often in very nasty weather conditions year round.


PXL_20210314_063336915.MPA very different look from the sides and if you check out the brochure you will find lots of photos of the interior which is more reminiscent of an airplane or fancy ferry with seats that have built in TV access and fully recline while you zip your way at up to 40 knots out to your place of work out on the high seas.
PXL_20210308_074723123.MPAnd on our opposite Starboard side we are even more friendly with this little Red & White catamaran, also built here in the Antalya Free Zone by Damen Shipyards.  With her “twin axe bows”, mv Allegro is a bit different design than Aqua Helix but also a “Fast Crew Supplier” and all three of us share many similar overall attributes so it is great fun to be sandwiched between these two family relations.
PXL_20210308_074624849Earlier in the week, “Allegro” had docked right in front of us on the end wall but we both moved over to the other side of the harbour yesterday because there was a large cargo ship coming in that needed the entire end wall where we have been docked for the past 3 weeks.  You can read all about Allegro HERE and when she is all finished she will head over to her new home in Germany.


Möbius is now rafted up and tied to Allegro for what we think will be the next few days but all subject to change without notice.


PXL_20210313_142107287This was the scene yesterday (Saturday) afternoon as we left our former neighborhood with our original two buddies Bozçay III and IV which are 19m Long by 8m wide so a L/B ratio of 2.4.  The day earlier they had push/pulled the little cargo ship “NewChang” into this corner slot in front of us so she could be loaded with hundreds of Bulk Bags of cargo.
PXL_20210313_142220111NewChang is registered in Hong Kong and weighs in at 25,569 tonnes with a LOA of 180 meters/590 ft and Beam of 32m/105 ft which for reference works out to a L/B ratio of 5.6



PXL_20210313_142345861A you can see here looking over to our new neighborhood sandwiched between Allegro and Aqua Helix, It was a very short trip across the harbour and so our move was all done in short order.
PXL_20210310_081043228.MPContinuing with the international theme of neighbors from different countries, we also had our first visitors aboard Möbius since she splashed when Wade and Diane drove up from Antalya for a day trip to come see us again now that we were in the water. 
Wade and Diane are fellow Canadians and cruisers who we met and visited on their boat sv Joana which is in the marina about 50nm east of us in Alanya.  They sailed up the Red Sea last year and are spending the next year or more exploring the gorgeous coastlines of Turkey so we hope to be able to anchor with them in the next month or so.  They drove up with another couple of cruisers, Erik and Pam who are also in the marina at Alanya beside Wade & Diane and we had a fun time taking them on a guided tour of Möbius and then out for a lovely lunch at a nearby restaurant right on the Med.

Möbius is Officially Flagged in the Bailiwick of Jersey!


PXL_20210310_111713168.MPHere is the photo I promised you last week with the Workshop door closed so you can see all of the newly mounted aluminium lettering of Möbius name and Port of Jersey.
PXL_20210310_074336602Even better, Uğur and Nihat kindly fabricated and mounted this removable AL flagpole!


PXL_20210310_111709026They no sooner had it bolted in place when Captain Christine jumped at the chance to do the very first flag raising and signal that we are now officially part of REG or the Red Ensign Group and are very eXcited about voyaging proudly under this commonwealth flag.
PXL_20210310_111120544Here is a shot looking aft at our previous neighbors, these 23m Police boats heading over to Oman when they are all finished.  While their mission is drastically different than ours, construction and systems wise we are all very much from the same family of boats.

As you can see, this photo was taken at the beginning of the week when we were back in our previous neighborhood on the end wall.

Hatches Matches

PXL_20210308_111719415One very welcomed bit of progress this past week was seeing these White beauties come aboard and get installed. 

Can you guess what these are?
PXL_20210308_111700241Probably not too hard a question for most of you who have been following for a long time, (or those who just read the sub title!) but yes, these are the wood liners for the three hatches in the Workshop such as this one which is way up high in the Doghouse over the entryway from the Swim Platform into the Workshop.
PXL_20210308_140213064I have been busier than a one armed wallpaper hangar as my Dad used to say so I will have to get you more photos when the finish these hatches next week but you can see how these wood liners slide snuggly up into the awaiting aluminium frames of the hatches welded into the deck.
PXL_20210308_111723257For those wondering, the odd shaped slots cut into the liners are to allow the tangs on the aluminium hatch handles to reach in to the aluminium blocks bolted to the inside of the frame sides.
PXL_20210308_111700241I will get better photos for you next week and show you how these hatches and latches I designed for Möbius actually work but you can get a good idea I think from this shot looking up at the two hatch handles up on the top end on this smaller 45cm x 45cm or 18 inch square hatch.

Commissioning Systems

PXL_20210313_101637374One of the big jobs upon launching a new boat is what is referred to as the “Commissioning” stage where of all the many systems that have been installed onboard are setup, adjusted, configured and tested.  As you can see here in the midst of us commissioning our Kabola KB45 Ecoline “Combi” diesel boiler it isn’t always “pretty” as we track down all the bugs and gremlins which show up at this stage of starting up all these systems for the very first time.
PXL_20210312_074256516.MPFor the bigger systems such as the Kabola diesel boiler we bring in a factory authorized technician to do all the initial adjustments of commissioning and this is Ali Polat from Kalender Services adjusting the fuel pressure on the Kabola.
PXL_20210312_074316985Commissioning of some of the more complex systems require very special servicing equipment such as this gas analyzer that Ali connected to set the CO and CO2  levels in the exhaust to get them to their Goldilocks settings for perfect combustion and fuel economy.

Ali ran into some problems finishing this today (Sunday) and had to fly back to Istanbul this afternoon so he has left the gas analyzer with me and I will get online with the technicians at Kobelt HQ in the Netherlands and complete the commissioning of the Kabola.


This Kabola diesel boiler will be our primary source of all hot water applications onboard XPM78-01 Möbius providing the just right temperature water to not only our DHW or Domestic Hot Water for showers and sinks, but also heated water for our in-floor heating and the Heat side of our HVAC or Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning system where it will heat up the interior air by blowing it across little radiators inside the four heat exchanger fan coils in our three Cabins.


PXL_20210313_130820596These new Ecoline Kabola boilers have reached the pinnacle of efficiency fuel economy and emissions wise but they are also built like tanks and as you know by now, that “Beauty and the Beast” combination always gets my attention and business.  This shot of the insides of the boiler assembly itself will give you a bit of an example of this.  The grey tube on the far Right is where the diesel injector lies and burns with a totally blue flame and then all the hot air circulates through all the pipes you see here with the heating fluid captured inside as part of the closed loop between the boiler and the Calorifier that holds all our hot water for DHW, in-floor heating and hot air heating.
PXL_20210313_105450149Another inner workings shot for you of the Left side of the Kabola where the waterworks all happen.  The heating fluid circulation pump is the Silver/Black item in the far lower Right and the Copper and SS tubing route the fluid (water and antifreeze) though the two separate coils of heat exchangers inside the Kabola with the upper primary one providing the heat inside the Calorifier and the secondary lower one providing the hot water for the Webasto fan coils inside each Cabin for backup interior heat.
PXL_20210306_094410106.NIGHTIn spite of all the other demands on my time I was able to carve out enough to get the Media or “sand” filter set up and filled.  This is the very first filter that the sea water goes through on its way to the Delvin 200 liter/hr watermaker and these things are truly awemazing in terms of their filtration capabilities.  Even as “just” a regular sand filter such as those used in most swimming pools these are incredible filters but I give this filter some superpowers by using Zeolite in place of regular silicone sand.  If this is new to you and you’re interested in knowing more, here is the Zeolite product description that does a good job of describing the properties and capabilities of Zeolite;

ZeoSand Product Description

What Is ZeoSand? ZeoSand is a high purity natural zeolite that has a unique three dimensional honeycomb structure. Natural zeolites were formed millions of years ago by alkaline salt water altering volcanic ash. ZeoSand is a new type zeolite that has a huge surface area and a natural ammonium ion trapping capacity. The same natural zeolite in ZeoSand is also used as a soil amendment and feed additive.

Why Does ZeoSand Give Superior Clarity? The sandpaper rough surface has 1 to 15 micron pore spaces that trap smaller particles than sand; thus, water clarity is improved. A cubic foot of ZeoSand has the surface area of 100 football fields – 100 times greater than sand. ZeoSand’s huge surface area holds more dirt than sand; therefore, the time between backwashes can be increased. How Does ZeoSand Control Chloramines? ZeoSand traps and holds ammonium ions through a molecular sieving or water softening action. Sand does not trap ammonium ions. Less ammonia means reduced eye-burning chloramines. Since chloramines are lower, chemical shock treatments are not needed as often. A twenty five pound bag of ZeoSand will trap about half a pound of ammonium ions. How Is ZeoSand Used? Typically, one 25 pound bag of ZeoSand replaces a 50 pound bag of sand. ZeoSand weighs 55 pounds per cubic foot compared to sand that weighs 100 pounds per cubic foot. To install, remove all of the sand from the filter, and repair any damaged parts. Fill the filter half way with water and slowly pour the ZeoSand into the filter. Backwash until the backwash water is clear; this will take several minutes. Turn the filter off for two minutes and let the ZeoSand settle. Backwash for an additional two minutes, and check to be sure the backwash water is clear. If the backwash water is clear, turn the multiport valve to filter and start the pump. How Long Does ZeoSand Last? Under normal conditions, ZeoSand will need to be replaced about as often as sand. After filter use, ZeoSand may be added to your garden or potted plants as a soil conditioner. ZeoSand may be discarded as a non hazardous waste

See what I mean?

PXL_20210306_100052654As you can see in the photo above I first put in a layer of 1/2 – 3/4” crushed rock which covered these six Black intake bodies which sit on the very bottom of the Blue filter body which is where the filtered salt water goes up to the top of the filter into the 6-way valve, and then poured in about 20kg of Zeolite “sand” to fill up the rest of this blue filter body.
PXL_20210306_104857844Then I followed the instructions you see here to fully rinse and clean out the initial filling of Zeolite prior to using it to filter the sea water going into the Watermaker.
PXL_20210313_112909006Many of you will recognize this 6-way valve on top of the Blue Zeolite/sand filter and it makes it easy for me to change from filtering to back flushing the Zeolite every few months to remove all the little nasties that the Zeolite has removed and send them all back out to sea and make live eXtremely easy for the other two finer paper filters on our watermaker so that they last up to a year rather than just a few weeks.

Tender Fenders!

PXL_20210213_065052488Can you guess what these Black rubber beauties are for?
PXL_20210213_065148953Correct!  These are the Fenders that wrap around the upper edge of our 6m AL Tender.  Our Tender is as much of a “working boat” as is Möbius and as I’ve outlined in several previous posts our Tender will be part “tug boat” and be able to push/pull Möbius if ever neccessary or enable us to assist other boats that get themselves into difficult situations or need towing.  Therefore we wanted to have an eXtremely strong and yet flexible fender system the same as proper tug boats have and that’s what you are seeing here.  Indeed we ordered these from a Turkish company that specializes in manufacturing these rubber beauties for boats up to 200 meters as well as the fenders you see in commercial ports and docks.
PXL_20210213_065138577I ordered the larger ones in the photo above, which are about 200mm/8” tall to wrap around the whole top edge of the Tender and then these smaller ones you see here which are about 120mm/5”
PXL_20210213_064857633.MPWhile the rubber is relatively hard, the hollow construction makes these 1.5 meter / 60” lengths quite flexible and so the technique that Uğur and I worked out was to start up at the bow and clamp the first length centered on the flat section of the bow and then bend it around the corners to run down both sides.
PXL_20210213_065048026On commercial tug boats they use the holes you see going through these rubber fenders to bolt the fenders to the hull.  However, I have this obsession about not having ANY penetrations of my aluminium hulls and so instead, we used this Bostik industrial adhesive which the manufacturer recommended to glue the fenders directly to the AL hull.
PXL_20210213_084024274It worked like a charm!

We would start by sanding and scrubbing both the AL and the rubber surface where the fenders will be glued and then wiped them both clean with Acetone and then Uğur applied a generous bead of the Bostik adhesive.
PXL_20210213_090421648We went through all the shops at Naval and rounded up over 100 clamps and used these to clamp the rubber fenders to the AL hull surfaces.
PXL_20210213_091910562That first length of rubber fender that wrapped around the bow was the most challenging and then it was on to the much easier job of gluing the other 1.5m lengths down both sides.


PXL_20210213_113126546.MPRinse and repeat!
PXL_20210213_120914614.MPThe butt joints where two fenders meet up were easy to do as we just put on a good bead of adhesive and then one of us would push them together tightly while the other set up the clamps to the hull.
PXL_20210213_131513755We cut some 10mm / 3/8” thick rubber to match the shape of the ends of each fender where they ended at the aft end to seal them off.
PXL_20210213_125202657We had both sides done in about 3 hours and ……
PXL_20210213_125138219.MP……. moved on to the smaller fenders to wrap around the Aft dive platform overtop of the Castoldi jet drive.
PXL_20210213_131500120.MPThis only took two lengths of rubber and it was an easy shape with a large radius corner on each side so this went quickly.
PXL_20210213_140105308.MPLooking a bit like a porcupine but the fenders were all glued on and we just needed to wait for a few days for the adhesive to fully cure before taking off all those clamps.
PXL_20210215_121321709.MPAs you can see it was worth the wait! 
PXL_20210215_121335574.MPHaving spent over a year all together designing this beauty, I am eXtremely happy with the way it has turned out and think it will be the Goldilocks Tender for Möbius. 
PXL_20210215_121343379.MPThe combination of the swim platform and the rubber fenders keep the Castoldi 224DD jet drive eXtremely well protected.
PXL_20210215_121403219.MPShe looks all the part and very much the slightly smaller partner for her mothership Möbius don’t you think?

But WAIT!!  There’s MORE!!!!!!!

I decided to double down on the TLC for our Tender and so once the fenders were all done I moved on to the last two bits to fully finish this mini Möbius.

Tender render with wood chocks-feetFirst up was designing and building a pair of chocks that will hold the Tender securely in place on the Aft Deck when the Tender is onboard Möbius when we are underway and where we stow the Tender every night.
Tender Chocks 1Alaaddin, who we call our “Turkish Fixer” because he fixes all our problems and he was able to find a local carpenter who would build these teak chocks for us which started with this lovely plank.
Tender Chocks 9He soon had that plank all planed and cut into the individual pieces that make up this pair of chocks.
Tender Chocks 7All glued up now.
PXL_20210209_131025688.MPA few days later the suitably happy Alaaddin delivered the finished chocks to me at the shipyard.
PXL_20210305_115547201.MPAnd just like Cinderella’s slipper, the fit was Goldilocks perfect!
PXL_20210305_115911598And the Tender was ready for her maiden voyage, on land as she emerged from Naval Yachts and headed out into the sunshine for the first time.

But WAIT!!  There’s still MORE!!!!!!!

More TLC for the Tender To Möbius

PXL_20210302_075534462I meant it when I said that I was going to double down on the TLC doses for our Tender and so the second item was designing and making a nice Sunbrella cover made to protect her from the UV and rain when she is waiting for us on the Aft Deck.
PXL_20210302_075458056Naval has a very talented and very FAST upholstery craftsman and so I turned to Sinan to help me design and build this lovely cover and two days later he called me to come check it out!


Tender cover rain tabs 2Sinan and I decided to add one little extra feature with two of these grommeted tabs that we can pull up with small strings going up to the Davit above that will prevent rain from pooling in the middle of the large horizontal areas of the Tender cover.

And as I believe Porky the Pig used to say; “Th …. th ……th …..that’s all folks”!

I am one pooped pirate after yet another 7 day work week and it is another late Sunday night over here and posting this blog post is between me and dinner so I’ll sign off for now.  Thank you all for following along and joining us on this journey that is nearing an end one of these days! Smile

As always, even though I am woefully tardy in responding to many of your comments, PLEASE do add your comments, questions and suggests in the Join the Discussion box below and I hope you will be back again next Sunday for the latest Progress Update on Project Goldilocks, aka XPM78-01 Möbius

Wayne



The Aqueous Phase of the Build – XPM78-01 Möbius 22-27 Feb, 2021

A VERY busy week here onboard the Good Ship Möbius as everyone on Team Möbius moves into the final stage of the build completing all the installations of equipment and beginning the commissioning of all these systems by their factory representatives and others.  Due to a major reconstruction project of the harbour inside the Free Zone * which removed all the previous launching facilities, Naval needed to launch us quite a bit sooner than expected by transporting Möbius overland to the nearby Setur Marina.  So in addition to the usual post launch commissioning of systems, we all continue to work our way through the Punch List of jobs needing to be completed in order to get Möbius into seaworthy condition to begin taking her out for sea trials.  To say that we are all eXtremely busy would be the understatement of the year!  But. for Christine and me, we are even more eXtremely eXcited to be back where we belong, home onboard a boat that floats.

* You can learn all about this huge and fascinating project by watching THIS VIDEO ANIMATION which does a great job of showing how the whole new harbour facility will work.

I hope you will accept my apologies in advance for another hurried weekly Möbius Update as I blast through as much of all the different jobs that we have all worked on this past week.  So grab your favorite beverage and chair and join me for this week’s Show & Tell.

Let me start with a quick snapshot leading up to this adventure that began over 5 years ago.


Mobius front Stbd render

After two years of intense collaborative design work with our AbFab Naval Architect Dennis at Artnautica Yacht Design, the building of XPM78-01 Möbius began at Naval Yachts on April 6, 2018. 
Launching Stbd side from Dincer1053 days of build time later, as most of you have likely seen in last week’s posting HERE, she finally left that temporary womb last Friday for a watery delivery into her permanent home with Mother Ocean last Saturday. 
PXL_20210222_081251718As I write this blog post from the SkyBridge of our beloved Möbius, we have just finished our first week afloat tied up to the concrete dock wall inside the Antalya Free Zone Harbour. 

And I am VERY happy, though not surprised, to report that ALL the sea water has remained where it belongs OUTSIDE of Möbius and our bilges only hold the remnants of construction dust and debris.

DOCKSIDE NEIGHBORS

PXL_20210222_081426614

Looking all the world to me like two tugs that escaped from a children’s animation story, these two almost new tugs are our most immediate neighbors.
PXL_20210223_125007789.MPTied up less than a meter in front of Möbius’ Bow.
PXL_20210227_065047889

These two tugs have crew aboard 24/7 as they are responsible for bringing every cargo ship into and out of the commercial side of the Harbour such as this recent little visitor, the 180m 36k Ton Argo B, who left about 04:30 this morning after loading up with several thousand “Big Bags” of industrial dry goods.
PXL_20210225_063350261These two tugs are also the Fire Boats for the Harbour.  And last night, they surprised and delighted us by bringing over a home made pizza just out of their oven!  Can’t think of a better example of why we LOVE living with these awemazing people of Turkey.
PXL_20210222_084755831.MPTied up almost as closely to our Stern is this first of four Police boats which are being built by Ares Yachts here in the Free Zone for the government of Oman.  These are a bit longer than us at about 26m but share many of the same basic attributes as our XPM-78 with all aluminum construction and built like the proverbial tank.
PXL_20210225_064345248We even have the same jet propulsion system though in our case just with our Tender and a single not these massive twin jet drives driven by two equally massive MAN diesel engines.
PXL_20210226_102842036One item that we do not share, YET! with these boats is that mount for a 50 cal machine gun.  But rest assured that once I get my 3D printer setup one of my first projects will be to create a realistic enough looking plastic replica to produce a silhouette that will add to our “don’t mess with me!” look to any onlookers thinking of approaching us with mal intent!
PXL_20210228_064153289I took this shot of our neighborhood early this morning after the Argo B had left and the tugs were back in front of us.  The weather has been truly spectacular for the past two weeks with daytime highs reaching 24C/77F and gloriously sunny clear blue skies with very little wind.  Not a bad place to spend our first week afloat.

For safety of such a new and incomplete boat, Christine and I are sleeping aboard each night and then going back to our apartment for breakfast and dinner and then we will move aboard full time once all the sea trials are done.

ANCHOR AWEIGH!

Bow render w anchor no railsOne of the projects I did not have enough time to show you last week was the completion of our rather unique “Sidewinder” anchor roller assembly that Dennis and I came up with so let me show that to you now.
150 Anchor Roller dim dwg v3I decided to make the two anchor rollers out of solid aluminium and didn’t take me long to design a 3D model of this in Autodesk Fusion 360 and create the 2D dimensioned drawings to machine them from.
PXL_20210210_133511164Aluminium is a dream to work with and the in house machine shop has a very good sized lathe that was easily able to machine the two anchor rollers out of a single blank of 200mm/8” OD aluminium round stock.
PXL_20210215_101708879I wanted to keep the anchor and the chain electrically isolated from the hull to reduce any corrosion problems and was able to do so with two details.  One is this Black Delrin bushing which we press fit into each roller with a nice rolling fit for the 40mm/1.6” SS pin that each roller spins on.
PXL_20210215_101554236The second isolating detail was to machine these Teflon discs that get separate the sides of the rollers from the inside cheeks of the anchor roller assembly welded into the hull.  Then a large SS end cap bolts on either end of the SS pin on the outside.
PXL_20210217_111230847Here is what that all looks like when assembled.
PXL_20210216_121707878For safety and quiet when pounding into big seas we very specifically designed the whole roller assembly to exactly match the shape of this 125kg/275lb Rocna anchor by obtaining a 3D model from Rocna to design with.  The way our design works is that those flared out bottom edges you see in the photo above have been designed such that they exactly match up with the inside of the flukes of the Rocna when pulled aboard and thus the Rocna becomes one with the hull and will not budge no matter what Mother Nature throws at us.  This creates not only a very tough and strong anchor mounting setup but also one that does not make any noise due to movement between the anchor and the roller assembly which is so common on many other boats we have run.
PXL_20210217_111212651So Nihat, Uğur and I spent quite a few hours with the anchor raised on a chain block that allowed us to get the position of the anchor just right and then layout the centers for each SS roller pin.  Front pin and roller have been mounted here and we are laying out the location for the 2nd Aft roller.
PXL_20210217_112203638Uğur and I came up with this idea of building an extended 40mm carbide hole saw so that he could drill both cheeks in one go and keep the two holes for the SS roller pin on the same centerline.  We lucked out finding the head of a 40mm carbide hole saw with its shank broken off and Uğur TIG welded a 200mm/8” long piece of 13mm/ 1/2” OD rod to it that we could chuck in my Milwaukee drill.  Worked like a charm!
PXL_20210217_134123280.MPWith the rollers both installed we tested it all out with the 13mm / 1/2” chain and the Maxwell VWC4000 Windlass and did a bit of tweaking of the rollers final shape to capture the chain nicely so it stays aligned as the chain goes Out/In and doesn’t twist. 
PXL_20210218_130220400Did not take us long to get to the Goldilocks Just Right point
PXL_20210219_063440982.MPand “Rocky” was in his new home as solid as his name.
PXL_20210217_151007235.MPUğur and Nihat both gave it their thumbs up and so we knew it was good to go!

BOTTOMS UP!

Another job and details I did not have time to post last week prior to the launch was the finishing of the silicone based International InterSleek 1100SR Foul Release bottom paint and the zinc anodes so let me go back and show you that.

PXL_20210215_101207324Once the super slick, slippery and shiny silicone InterSleek was fully dry the last few underwater details could be attended to such as mounting the Red plastic prop on the Vetus 220kgf 300mm/12” Extended Run Time Bow Thruster.
PXL_20210215_101145530Which is capped off with its own Zinc to reduce any problems with corrosion due to the mix of dissimilar metals involved with its construction of Bronze, SS and AL.
PXL_20210216_111830409.MPIn keeping with our Darth Vader, lean & mean look, we decided to make the 100mm/4” Boot Stripe that makes the transition between the top of the Black InterSleek and the bare AL hull, be gloss Black as well and we are eXtremely happy with the result that emerged as the masking tape came off to reveal the final look.
PXL_20210216_121054898The final detail for the underwater portion of the hull was mounting the ten 125mm / 5” diameter Zinc anodes which keeps all the metal bits that are in contact with seawater all at the same potential voltage and eliminates the battery effect that would eat away at our precious Stainless Steel, AL and Bronze components. 
PXL_20210216_121611273Being near the bottom of the Noble scale of metals, Zinc is what will erode instead and makes it easy to replace the zincs every few years when they get too worn away.
PXL_20210216_121418621.MPWe designed a very simple mounting system for the Zincs and Uğur had previously welded 80mm discs of 20mm / 3/4” thick AL to the hull with an M16 thread in the center for the SS M16 bolt that he is fastening this Zinc on the Rudder with.
PXL_20210219_063321360To ensure a good electrical connection for many years between the Zinc and the AL mounting disc, we coated those surfaces and the bolt with dielectric grease and then I followed along after Uğur and covered the SS bolt heads with some clear silicone to make it all the easier to remove and replace these zincs in a couple of years.  I usually do this while the boat is in the water using my Hookah or Snuba system so these little details all help to make that job go quick and easy.
PXL_20210219_063354149With all these preparations of the below the waterline areas of the hull and everything removed from underneath, Möbius was ready for the arrival of “Big Bird” the yellow 72 wheel boat mover to arrive the next morning and carry her overland to the marina for launching.

TILLER ARM DETAILS:


Tiller Arm w cylindersAnother few details that we needed to look after before Launch Day were for the all important steering system and the Tiller Arm in particular.  Similar to the Bow Rollers, last year I had designed this typically over engineered Tiller Arm in Fusion 360 and had it CNC milled out of a single block of aluminum.
Tiller Arm being fittedHere is a shot from almost a year ago when we first mounted the finished Tiller Arm to the 127mm / 5” OD solid AL Rudder Post.
PXL_20210118_151755877And here is a more recent shot of what it looks like with the two double acting Kobelt hydraulic steering cylinders in place.
PXL_20210215_143337875Such a massive Tiller Arm being powered by equally as beefy twin hydraulic cylinders, produces a LOT of force and so there needs to be some eXtremely strong and solid Tiller Arm Stops built in to stop the Tiller Arm when it goes hard over to each side.  Fusion 360 to the rescue yet again to help me quickly design these Stops which Uğur and Nihat quickly fabricated and were ready to mount.
PXL_20210215_153108831After carefully testing out the Just Right position for each stop, they were able to drill the four holes in the AL Rudder Shelf and bolt down one Stop in either side of the Tiller Arm body.  The SS bolt and lock nut allow us to adjust the final Stop position of the Tiller Arm once we are in the water and have the steering all working.
PXL_20210118_134133102I like to practice and live well by what I call “Readiness for the UneXpected” and in the case of our steering system that meant having multiple layers of fault tolerance for the Steering System.  This starts with twin independent Kobelt 7080 hydraulic steering cylinders sized so that either one can fully steer the boat in the most adverse sea conditions.

Then two independent Kobelt Accu-Steer HPU400 24V hydraulic Power Pack pumps, two independent Furuno 711C AutoPilots plus two independent Furuno Jog Levers.  This gives us eight levels of fault tolerance to go through.



PXL_20210226_121100138And if ALL of that should uneXpectedly fail, then we have this Kobelt manual hydraulic Steering Pump ……………
PXL_20210225_140913191.MP ……….. that we can slide this Emergency Steering wheel onto and steer the boat the “old fashioned” way.
PXL_20210121_080012586.MPAnd if ALL of that should somehow uneXpectedly fail we have THIS final layer of fault tolerance for our steering system; a completely independent and manual Emergency Tiller Arm.
PXL_20210118_134143252Can’t get too much more KISSS or Keep It Simple Smart & Safe than this; a 2m/6.5ft length of 80mm thick walled AL pipe that slides through the 20mm/ 3/4” thick plate we see Uğur bolting to the Tiller Arm body and then the pipe slides through a matching hole bored through the top of the Rudder Post. 
PXL_20210121_080012586.MPWe attach a block and tackle setup on each side of the end of the Emergency Tiller which fasten to shackles mounted on stringers on the adjacent hull sides which allows us to move and lock the Rudder in any position we want.

Yes, I do know that it works and Yes, you can ask me how I know that!

Miscellaneous Work on Deck

Finishing up this blog post is between me and another very late dinner so I’m going to speed through a series of other jobs that got done this first week in the water.
PXL_20210215_131834473Turkish Turquoise Marble countertops got installed atop both Vent Boxes on the Aft Deck to create our Outdoor Galley.
PXL_20210215_131519658.MPSS sink plumbed.
PXL_20210215_085612478And installed in the Starboard/Right side Vent Box.
PXL_20210215_131927886Plumbing connections all ready to connect to the sink; Red & Blue PEX lines with shut off valves for the Hot/Cold water to the sink faucet, Brass elbow for the sink’s drain and small Blue tube with the Black elbow to drain the water extracted by the Mist Eliminator grills in the Engine Room supply air duct.
PXL_20210216_105438835.MPOrhan with his home made adaptor for his pneumatic caulking gun ……..
PXL_20210216_122129530…….  to get into some hard to reach spots around the Pilot House windows like these.
PXL_20210218_134142509Uğur prepping the nylon insert mounts for the Passarella on the Swim Platform and another on the Port side gate.
PXL_20210226_122256916Ever the ingenious one on Team ,Uğur came up with this brilliant DIY solution for mounting our Fire Hose in the HazMat Locker; an empty plastic spool of MIG welder wire!

PXL_20210226_122310591Which will rotate on this pipe mounted on the side of the HazMat Locker.
PXL_20210227_133714661With the Black Fire Nozzle mounted alongside.  Any wonder why I just love working with this guy who has been with us from the very first day of the build?!!!
PXL_20210227_110021249More Uğur Goodness, on Saturday no less, as we designed and built this simple setup for propping the front 3 Solar Panels mounted on this hinged frame up in the horizontal position when we are on anchor.

This horizontal position not only helps out with solar power production but you can see the demister grill across the far end of what now becomes a giant wind tunnel to capture all the fresh breezes blowing over our bow at anchor and funnel them down into the SuperSalon.
PXL_20210227_105959889Two SS pipes that are hinged to the bottom of the Solar Panel frame and will fit into these Black Delrin collars Uğur machined which were then glued down to the aluminium floor with a SS set screw to lock them in place.

When we are ready to convert to passage making mode and head out to sea, you simply lift the panels up a few inches and the two support rods slide aft as the panel is lowered down and locked into place.

ELECTRIAL WORKS:

Our Sparkie Hilmi always has a long list of electrical jobs that need his attention and this past week was certainly no exception.  With almost 150 circuit breakers on XPM78-01 Möbius to safely look after all our 12 & 24 Volt DC circuits and our all our 120V & 240V AC circuits, it was quite the design challenge to figure out where and how to place all these.

PXL_20210226_085403482We ended up with two primary circuit breaker panels; this one on the angled short wall on the Stbd/Right side of the Main Helm Station.
PXL_20210226_085300787.PORTRAITAnd this larger one in the Corridor at the bottom of the stairs leading down from the SuperSalon to the Guest Cabin, Ships Office and Workshop/Engine Room.
PXL_20210226_085119437After months and months of preparation, Hilmi was finally able to bring it all together this past week by attaching these Black AL panel fronts with all the engraved labels onto the hinged access doors into each of these Circuit Breaker panels.

Next week the hinged glass doors are due to arrive which will finish off these critical component of the electrical system on Möbius.

GLASS WORK

PXL_20210224_133202907.MPThe double paned 16mm thick glass window finally got installed in the Engine Room door this week which is a critical component to completely closing in the Engine Room in the case of a fire.
PXL_20210224_083947825.MPAnd the gas lift cylinders have now all been installed on the Glass Deck Hatches which I designed and Naval built in house.  Now just need to finish installing the rubber edge seals and the AL hatch handles and the deck is totally watertight!

HELM STATIONS:

PXL_20210217_125040209I can’t possibly do justice to explain the amount of work that Christine has done this past week alone on getting all our navigation and electronics in both Helm Stations all setup and working. 

Nor can I articulate how much I LOVE my Captain!
PXL_20210228_064153289What I can do though is to leave you with this shot from early this morning that does capture for me just how well we have succeeded in designing and building our new home with all of Team Möbius to meet the goal we set out over 5 years ago to blend in perfectly when in a commercial dock as apposed to a ‘yachty’ marina.
And with that I am going to hit the “Publish” button on this latest Möbius Weekly Progress Update and look forward to bringing you more Show & Tell of this coming week’s progress that begins first thing tomorrow morning.

But WAIT!!!

There’s MORE!!!!!

One year ago, Christine and I returned from a brief trip over to the UK for her Birthday (March 15th) just as the whole Corona 19 pandemic was ramping up and caught us squarely in the vortex.  Given our ages, let’s just say rapidly approaching 70, every day since we have been playing a kind of Russian Roulette by going into the shipyard to work on Möbius and so we are eXtremely eXcited that tomorrow morning at 11am we are going to get our Covid 19 vaccine shots!

Of course, this doesn’t put an end to anything really but sure will help with our upcoming travel plans, for which we shall be eternally grateful to this country we have called home for almost four years now and that love a wee bit more every day.  Thank you Turkey for allowing these two salt water turkies to enjoy your beautiful country and people!

-Wayne


The Captain and Mr. Gee get CRANKY! XPM78-01 Möbius Update 01-06 Feb. 2021

Not as much progress as we would have wanted to report this week as many of Team Möbius were MIA working on other boats at Naval Yachts and also prepping one of the boats beside us for its Owner’s visit tomorrow. 

However, that didn’t stop the rest of us from making good progress and we achieved several big milestones that we are very eXcited to share with you now.  So get a good beverage and comfy chair of your choice and come along for this week’s Möbius.World Show & Tell.

The Captain & Mr. Gee Get Cranky!

PXL_20210206_140841305Several years ago, when I was answering some of Christine’s typically probing questions about why Mr. Gee our Gardner 6LXB was the Goldilocks Just Right, Just for us Choice for the main (and only) engine in XPM78-01 Möbius, Christine likes to say “You had me at Hand Cranked”. 

This is in reference to me mentioning that one of the Gardner’s many eXtremely appealing features is that they could be fitted with this Chain Hand Crank option.

As you can see, this kind of “crankiness” makes my Captain eXtremely happy which makes me eXXtremely happy! Smile
Gardner Chain   Direct Hand Starting exploded diagram

Very KISSS Keep It Simple Smart Safe as you can see with a rod running along the top of of the engine with handles at both ends with an Upper Chainwheel that transfers the crank’s rotation via a Chain down to a Lower Chainwheel keyed onto the engines crankshaft. 
Old Hand Crank model 1Michael and his team at Gardner Marine Diesel or GMD in Canterbury England were able to salvage all these parts off one of the many 6LXB’s they have in their inventory and sent them to me many months ago and I’ve been working on fitting them to Mr. Gee ever since.

You would think it would be a relatively quick and simple process to just clean and paint all these parts and install them on Mr. Gee …………………… but you’d be wrong!
NEW hand crank illustration Plate 12 Spare Parts 702.1 One problem was that Mr. Gee is one of the later models of 6LXB and it had this quite different Hand Crank with just one handle on the front of the engine and a different crankshaft and Chainwheel setup down on the new style crankshaft.
Front Hand Crank adaptorSecondly, as you can see in this shot of the front support and Upper Chainwheel I’ve mounted onto Mr. Gee, there is no room up front for the Hand Crank handle, let alone enough room for me to get in there to crank it.  So I needed to come up with a “Hybrid” Hand Crank setup that would allow me to marry the Old style with the Hand Crank Handle at the rear, to the new crankshaft end up front.

And just to put a particularly sharp point on this challenge, I also needed to drive the Jabsco Sea Water pump and one of our monster 250 Amp @24V Electrodyne alternators off the front of the crankshaft as well.

Hmmmmm

Let’s just say that the front of Mr. Gee became a very busy and challenging spot for me to sort out.


PXL_20201122_095008369When I am doing this kind of problem solving and exploration of new design ideas I have evolved to using pieces of stiff cardboard I cut up from shipping boxes to capture the critical dimensions and sketch out my rough ideas. 
PXL_20201122_095015832It is a surprisingly efficient system as I get to reuse the many cardboard boxes all our hundreds of shipments come in and the stiffness of the cardboard makes is very easy to sketch on when I’m laying under or over an engine for example with my digital Vernier calipers or tape measure in hand and recording all the critical dimensions.
Gardner Chain Wheels dim sketchesI then use Microsoft Office Lens utility on my Pixel4XL phone to digitize these sketches so I have a more permanent digital copy to keep and one I can print out if needed.

I don’t expect these to make much sense to anyone else but they work eXtremely well for me to record all these details and dimensions as I work my way through the different ways I come up with to solve a particular problem, create 3D models of them and ultimately machine or fabricate the parts I need and finally get them installed.
Gardner Front Chainwheels   timing belt pulley dim sketch colorAfter much head scratching and sketching, eventually this layout emerged as a way that I could fit both the RED Chain based Hand Crank system and the GREEN cogged timing belt system for driving the Electrodyne “Big Red #1” in the upper Right here and the Jabsco sea water pump on the far Left.

I will show you the Green cogged timing belt drive system next week and show you the Red chain based Hand Crank system now.
Crankshaft Chainwheel   cogged pulleys Fusion 360 renderWith all the dimensions and my ideas roughed out on cardboard I then move over to Autodesk Fusion 360 to create a 3D model of all these parts where I can put my ideas to the test and see if they will actually work out.  This is a quick screen grab of the model I came up with from the sketches you saw above. 
I won’t bore you with all the details but for orientation Mr. Gee is mostly off the screen on the far Right and the Red disk is the Lower Chainwheel on Mr. Gee’s Crankshaft running horizontally across the bottom of the screen.  On the front side of this is the cogged pulley driving the rubber timing belt that goes up to the cogged wheel on the Jabsco sea water pump.

*  Note: I didn’t bother to model the actual chain and sprocket teeth so you will have to imagine that being wrapped around the Red Chainwheel. 

The Green and Blue disks on either side of the Red Chainwheel are two of several flanged parts I needed to machine for my Hybrid Old/New Gardner Hand Crank system.


PXL_20210201_150213957Oh, and did I mention that the Old Gardner Hand Crank system used a different pitch of chain than the New style?

So I had GMD send me the Upper and Lower Chainwheels from the New style that would fit nicely on the New style of Crankshaft that Mr. Gee has but the third Idler Chainwheel (part #37 in the Gardner illustration up above) had to the the Old style Chain as it is part of the cast aluminium bracket that supports the Old style cranking shaft. 
FYI: Eventually I will design and machine a whole new Idler Chainwheel with the New style Chain pitch but for now I just mounted the Old Idler in my drill press and hand milled the teeth to get the New Chain to fit as you see here.


PXL_20210204_122850144This is that Blue coloured Flange I pointed out AL in the rendering of the 3D Fusion 360 model above, which was quit easy to machine on a lathe out of solid aluminium round stock and then broach the keyway through the inner hole so it will be locked into the 3/8 x 3/8” key on the front end of the Crankshaft.


PXL_20210204_122908730Now you can see how this newly machined AL Flange slides into the New style Lower Chainwheel which is now all sand blasted clean and painted Black.

All well and good but I’m sure that most of you are now asking “How the heck does this work to turn Mr. Gee’s Crankshaft Wayne? 

That’s the job of the eXtra part you see here that rotates on a pin sticking out of the Chainwheel.  This little part is the key to making the Hand Crank work and is called a “Ratcheting Pawl” part #3 in the Gardner Illustration above.
PXL_20210205_140738395I don’t have a milling machine (yet!), but to badly reuse The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, (for those of you old enough to remember) “We don’t need no stinkin’ milling machine” right?

Nothing that a bit of ingenuity and my handy dandy 45 year old drill press and shiny new vice can’t handle.  I machined a short shaft to just fit inside the hole of  AL bushing and tightened that in the vice jaws.
PXL_20210205_140824688This allowed me to slowly rotate the AL bushing into the 4 flute spiral milling cutter in my drill press so I could mill away the four recesses for the Pawl to fit into and ended up looking like this.
PXL_20210205_141628196So to Hand Crank Mr. Gee you simply reach down and rotate the Pawl counter clockwise so it engages in one of the four recesses like this.

Now when Christine turns that Hand Crank Handle on the Aft end of Mr. Gee as you see her doing in the opening photo, the Upper Chainwheel rotates the Chain CCW, which transfers that force down to the Lower Chainwheel which the Pawl has now locked to the Crankshaft and around goes Mr. Gee! 
This takes a good bit of muscle but with the compression relief levers keeping the intake valves open it isn’t too difficult to bring Mr. Gee’s massive flywheel up to speed and then you flip the compression levers back off and Mr. Gee chugs to life and begins to purrrrrr.  Doesn’t get too much more KISSS or reliable than that!

PXL_20210205_141659563Oh, and for those of you following all this, as Mr. Gee starts up you no longer need to turn the Hand Crank Handle and so the Pawl “ratchets” out of the recess back to this disengaged position such that the Chainwheel is now stationary while the AL Flange and Crankshaft spin together.
PXL_20210205_143910615To finish putting this all together, I machined a groove into the AL bushing for this spring steel circlip to fit into which keeps the Chainwheel aligned and spinning on the AL bushing.
PXL_20210206_135651951With the Lower Chainwheel assembled onto its new AL Flange, into the Engine Room I go and with a bit of TefGel 45 to help it slides just perfectly onto the keyed portion of the front end of the Crankshaft.

That modified Idler Chainwheel is in the upper Right here and it adjusts sideways in the slot you can see to the right of the Chain which you tighten down to keep the Chain Just Right Tight.
PXL_20210206_135637489Not much space in here so a bit difficult to photograph but hopefully you can now see how the whole Chain driven Hand Crank system works.
PXL_20210206_140841305And to come full circle, you now understand what put that great grin on my Beautiful Bride and Captain.

INTERIOR UPDATES:

While we were cranking away on Mr. Gee, Hilmi and Ramazan were cranking away up in the SuperSalon so let’s go see what they have been up to this past week.


PXL_20210202_125938206Ramazan has finished installing all the Ado LVT vinyl plank flooring and you may recall that Uğur, Nihat and I installed these two SS locking lift handles in the large hatch to access the Basement that is under the whole of the SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20210202_125923462.MPMost of Ramazan’s masterfully laid down flooring is covered in protective cardboard but you can see how nicely he has fit the edges around the hatch so they are barely visible.

But what’s that I see over on the far Left here?
PXL_20210201_111258391.MPAha! Our 50” Samsung 4K SmarTV has arrived and will soon be mounted on a fully adjustable mounting system that fits into the recess in the now opened hinged and slotted Rosewood door. 

But who’s that hiding behind that door?
PXL_20210201_111436078.MPOf course!  Hilmi and Christine are busy finishing up all the wiring for AC, DC, Ethernet and N2K that runs inside the large space behind the TV.
PXL_20210202_125951335This is also where our Boat Computer #1 will reside and Christine is anxious to start connecting it up and getting all our display screens up and running next week.
PXL_20210205_113903023While she waits for Hilmi to finish the wiring behind the 50” TV, Christine fired up Boat Computer #2 and started setting things up in the SkyBridge Helm Station.
PXL_20210205_085307113.MPIn the midst of all this, Sinan was back this week to start sewing up the Sunbrella covers like this one for that Upper Helm Station.  He is also making a similar cover for the Upper Helm Chair and I will show you that next week.

Boot Stripe:


PXL_20210202_095316082Not a lot of progress on the Bottom Paint this week but they did get started on the 100mm / 4” Black Boot Stripe that makes the transition between the bare aluminium hull sides and the InterSleek 1100SR silicone Foul Release bottom paint which I have marked off for the painters here.
PXL_20210203_084950069The International Epoxy primer has now been on longer than the maximum recoat time so they needed to do a light sanding so that the International Perfection Polyurethane paint will adhere well.
PXL_20210205_110308646.MPThe laser level makes is SO must faster and easier to mark out perfectly straight and level lines for the masking tape to follow.

Next week the paint crew will hopefully be on site to spray on the Black Boot Stripe and then once it is dry they can mask it off and start applying the InterSleek Foul Release Bottom Paint.  Hope to be able to show you all that next week as well.

All Donations Gratefully Received!

PXL_20210204_111609737.MPHmmmm……………..

Why is THAT truck parking beside Möbius??
PXL_20210204_111756370.MPYup!  I’ve saved two of our bigger milestones for the end of this week’s Show & Tell.  That’s a diesel fuel truck and Cihan is about to bring the very first drops of diesel fuel into our six integral fuel tanks!
PXL_20210204_115439374It took a lot of time but I think we came up with an eXtremely effective design for both the Fuel Fills and Vents on Möbius. 
PXL_20210204_115453633With the fully sealed lid removed you have ready access to these three Fill Pipes on the Starboard/Right side and a matching set on the Port/Left side.  These each connect to one of the six integral fuel tanks at the bottom of the hull with 40mm / 1 5/8” ID rubber fuel hose.
PXL_20210204_115447196Just forward of the Fuel Fills, these inverted 40mm U pipes are similarly connected by that same size rubber fuel hose to the vents on each fuel tank.  Together these both worked just perfect on this first fueling test with no foaming or “spit back”.
PXL_20210204_115412676But mistakes can and will happen so we designed these Fuel Fill stations to have a large capacity spill tanks below the Fill Pipes so that any diesel that does overflow will simply run into this spill tank and drain back into the fuel tank.  No mess, no fuss, no bother.
PXL_20210204_115422773When the Fuel Fill cover is in place it completely seals off all the Fill Tubes from the outside air and from any sea water on decks.  The Fuel Vent pipes have this slotted cover so they stay well vented and there is a drain pipe inside to remove any seawater that might make its way through the slots.
PXL_20210204_115015814.MPFor this first load of diesel, we only took on enough fuel to do all the commissioning of diesel based equipment such as the Kabola KB45 boiler, all the fuel transfer pumps, Alfa Laval fuel centrifuge, fuel polishing system and Mr. Gee of course and then enough for the first set of sea trials. 
Hence, we only took on a “measly” 2150 Liters / 567 USG out of the 14,600 Liters / 3860 USG that we will take on prior to our first passage.  However, as per the intro, all donations are still very much welcomed! Winking smile

X marks the Spot!

PXL_20210206_082334595OK, are you ready for the final milestone that Christine and I just completed yesterday? 

Does this help you guess what we are up to?
PXL_20210206_082345994Helpful hint:  It took place UP here.
PXL_20210203_073143437.MPThat’s right!  Time to apply these CNC cut vinyl letters and numbers to put the XPM78-01 markings big and bold on Möbius’ Bow.
PXL_20210206_083629682.MPAll pretty simple to do.  First mark off the top edge of the lettering with a straight edge and pencil.
PXL_20210206_084701016Give the area a good cleaning with 3M Scotch Brite pads and water, rinse well and then sponge on a coat of clean water with lots of liquid dish soap in it so you can slide the lettering as needed to get it perfectly aligned.
PXL_20210206_093916021Peel off the inside layer of the peel & stick lettering and press it onto the soapy wet hull and use your fingers and a plastic spreader to squeeze out all the water and get all the letters and numbers perfectly aligned and adhered to the hull. 
PXL_20210206_090548321.MPThen carefully peel off the outer layer and go over each letter with lots of pressure on soapy fingers and plastic scrapers taking special care to ensure that all edges are tightly bonded to the hull and there are no bubbles or wrinkles.
IMG_1067Bring in some cheap labour if you must.
PXL_20210206_094724331.MPTake your time to go over each letter and number several times.
PXL_20210206_091056342.MPThen stand back to check out the proportions and placement.

Goldilocks!!
PXL_20210206_124024008And yes, we would be delighted to be mistaken for a military/coastguard ship in the unlikely event that anyone is considering approaching us with mal intent!
PXL_20210206_124011267Now THAT is a Bow to be proud of!
And that’s a wrap for the week that was February 01-06, 2021.

Thank you all SO much for taking the time to join us here and we hope you will be back again next week.  In the interim please be sure to put your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Thanks! 

-Wayne

We’re Shafted, and that’s a GOOD Thing! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Jan 25-30, 2021

As Launch Date looms larger and sooner the theme of checking off all the “little Big” jobs on the punch list continues although we still have a few “Big” jobs such as painting the bottom with foul release paint which continued as well this past week so without any further ado let’s jump right in to see all those jobs both little and BIG that Team Möbius looked after this week of January 25-30, 2021.

We’re Shafted!

PXL_20201027_161439955One of the “little Big” jobs that we completed this past week is getting the propeller shaft fully aligned with the output flange on the Nogva Gearbox and hence this week’s title.

In this photo the dark Burgundy is the Aft Output end of the Nogva Gearbox and the bright Red is the flange on the propeller shaft which continues through the Tides Marine shaft seal system and out of the boat through the large AL prop shaft tube which is hidden here by the Blue Tides Marine silicone bellows hose.
Nogva CPP prop   shaft dim dwg from NogvaThis dimensioned drawing of the complete Nogva CPP or controlled Pitch Propeller, shaft, seal and flange will help orient things a bit.


PXL_20201027_161424326Here I have gone below the boat rotate the CPP prop back and forth while pushing it hard forward so that the two flanges meet.  A few months back we had spent quite a bit of time getting this alignment close as we installed the anti-vibration mounts on the Gardner and the Nogva and you read about that HERE, so now it was time for the fine and final adjustment to get these two flanges perfectly aligned.
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualAs you may recall from previous posts the two flanges need to be eXtremely closely aligned both concentrically as per the illustration on the Left and also laterally as shown on the Right.  Maximum deviation we are allowed is up to 0.005mm / 0.002in (human hair is about 0.05mm diameter) and ideally we are going for zero.
PXL_20210129_073442895.MPNeeding such perfection I called on my Perfect Partner, aka Captain Christine to assist and although she is prone to laying down on the job (sorry, couldn’t resist) she was a huge help and made this task go much faster.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPWe check the alignment by inserting a thin feeler gauge, which is the silver strip you see here, that is a tight sliding fit into the space between the faces of these two flanges and see what the gap is at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock.  Any difference in size of the gap at these locations tells us how far it is out either horizontally at 3 & 6 o’clock or vertically at 12 and 6. 
PXL_20210129_084307980Adding to the challenge the prop shaft needs to be supported in its perfectly centered position which my red hydraulic bottle jack is looking after.
PXL_20201028_093808559Mr. Gee, our Gardner 6LXB is solidly bolted up to the Nogva Gearbox so they are essentially an eXtremely solid single unit that is supported by six anti-vibration mounts such as the Silver one you can see on the Stbd. side of the Nogva Gearbox on the far Right in this photo.  You can see the large vertical threaded part of these mounts with the large supporting hex nut on the bottom and smaller locking nut on the top. 
To align the flanges vertically I need to turn the large nuts at the very front of Mr. Gee or these back two on the Nogva, Up/Down to move the Nogva flange until the gap is zero all the way around.


PXL_20201028_093728662The process then is for me to go around the four Front/Rear mounts and turn those big nuts Up/Down while Christine moved the feeler gauges around the circumference of the flanges and called out the differences in the gap to me. 

With Christine laying down in the space behind the Aft end of the ER Enclosure overtop of the Tides Marine seal at the bottom, there wasn’t enough room to take a photo but this previous shot shows what she was doing as she reached in with the feeler gauges to check the gap and call out the differences to me.  Doing this all by myself was very time consuming so now you see what I called in the Big Boss to help out! 

It still took us almost 2 hours but in the end we got the gap down to zero such that both flanges were touching all the way around. 
PXL_20210129_084325319With these two flanges now fully aligned we could insert the 8 hardened Grade 8 bolts through both flanges and torque them down to 120NM and the alignment was done! 

White grease is TefGel 45 to prevent any corrosion and ensure that these nuts are just as easy to undo after many years on the job when we need to remove the prop shaft or the Nogva/Gardner for some reason in the distant future.
Tides Marine SureSeal illustrationMany of these “little Big” jobs are like dominos in that as getting one done lets you do the next.  So with the flanges aligned and mounts all torqued down I could now finish installing the Tides Marine SureSeal system. This is an eXtremely critical bit of kit as this is responsible for keeping the prop shaft cutlass bearing lubricated with a flow of fresh sea water AND keeping that sea water OUT of the boat!
PXL_20210129_124430339Here is what the real deal looks like now fully installed.  The Blue silicone “Articulating hose” in the illustration above, is double clamped onto the Stern or Prop Shaft Tube at the bottom and onto the Black SureSeal housing at the top. 

The way this works is that inside the SureSeal are two stationary rubber lip seals with the 65mm OD Prop Shaft rotating inside them that keeps the water sea water inside the Prop Shaft Tube from being able to get past and into the boat. 

We keep a VERY close eye on that Blue silicone hose over the years as if it were to ever rupture we would have an eXtremely large volume of water flooding into the boat!

FYI,
The Black ring at the top is the very handy holder for a second set of replacement lip seals which you can change out with the boat still in the water as you don’t have to remove the Prop Shaft to replace them; just pry the old ones forward, cut them off and slide the new ones into place.


PXL_20210129_124446081Last part of installing the SureSeal system is to provide a pressurized flow of fresh sea water into the Prop Shaft Tube which travels down the tube and lubricates the Cutlass bearing which supports the Prop Shaft as it exits the boat.

One of the reasons I chose to locate the Silver Heat Exchanger you see in the Upper Right was to be able to tap into its drain plug on the salt water side and use this as the source of pressurized salt water for the SureSeal.  Nice short hose run and Cihan had that all hooked up in no time.  The second Red hose on the Left goes up along the Aft wall of the ER with a ball valve on the end of it so that I can check the salt water flow rate when we first start up and from time to time afterwards and ensure that there is at least 4L/min / 1USG/min when the engine is idling.
PXL_20210129_124414968.MPBoth those little Big jobs checked off the list and this is what the finished result looks like when peering down into the space Christine has now vacated on the outside of the Aft wall of the ER.  Silver Gardner Coolant Heat Exchanger bottom right, Tides Marine SureSeal middle Left and Red Prop Flange middle Right and the Red Nogva Gearbox Oil Heat Exchanger at the top.

To keep the ER air tight a 6mm AL plate is bolted with a gasket over top and covered wtih the same composite grid floor plates as the rest of the Workshop and ER.
Heat Exchangers labelledCihan checked off another Big little job by plumbing the Sea Water and Engine Coolant water lines up at the forward Starboard/Right corner of Mr. Gee and the ER.  It is pretty busy up there so I’ve labelled some of this plumbing to help you make sense of it.  Can be a bit confusing as there are three fluids running around here; Sea Water that comes in via the Sea Chest just visible on the far middle Right here and through the Strainer and Manifold on its way to the Jabsco Impeller Pump and then out of that Pump and into the Engine Oil Heat Exchanger where it runs Aft exiting out and into that Silver Sea Water Heat Exchanger you saw up above in the SureSeal installation sequence.

Hope you got all that because YES children that WILL be on the Test on Friday!

Driving Big Red #2

Electrodyne #2 jack shaft labelledOver on the opposite Port/Left side of Mr. Gee I finally have the drive system for our second Electrodyne 250Ah @ 24V alternator all designed and the adapters all machined so time to get them all installed.  You may recall this photo from THIS previous blog post about installing what I call Big Red #2 and how I intended to drive it from the PTO or Power Take Off on the Gardner using a Jack Shaft I had from a previous job.
Jackshaft renderThis is a quick screen shot from my Fusion 360 design for the adapters at either end of the Red JackShaft.  Green cylinder on the far Left is the Output shaft from the Gardner PTO, Purple is the AL adaptor to couple the Jackshaft to the PTO and at the far Right in Gold is the steel multi V-belt drive pulley that came with the Electrodyne which I will machine with four threaded holes to bolt the other end of the Red Jackshaft to. 


Note: Jackshaft simplified here to just a rod with flanges at either end.


PXL_20210130_125654649This is the PTO from the Gardner with that Purple aluminium adaptor in the rendering above now pushed onto the Green PTO Output shaft and secured with four round hex head through bolts. 

The Red Flange on the front U-joint end of the JackShaft barely visible on the Right will bolt to that AL adaptor with four more M6 SS bolts.
PXL_20210130_125702007This is the Aft end of the JackShaft where this U-joint will be similarly bolted to that steel 8V pulley on Big Red #2.
PXL_20210130_125713105The day came to an end at this point yesterday so not quite finished but this shot will show you how the whole JackShaft will connect the power from the PTO back to Big Red #2.  This monster Electrodyne alternator could absorb as much as 10HP at full 250 amps of output which the gear driven PTO can put out easily and this Cardan or Jack Shaft should be more than up to the task.

Stay tuned for more though folks on the final installation of Big Red #2 next week AND just wait till you see the sweet setup I’ve come up with to drive Big Red #1 using a cogged timing belt setup that is now almost done.

Well Sand My Bottom!

PXL_20210125_083618470Also not quite done but work continued this past week on getting the bottom underwater portion of the hull all primed and filled in preparation for applying the silicone based Foul Release paint, International InterSleek 1100SR.

The Paint Crew finished applying all the epoxy filler to smooth out all the welds and create a sleek smooth surface for the InterSleek 1000SR Foul Release top coat to come.

You can see some of the filled welds around the Prop Tunnel above and
PXL_20210125_113912527….. the filleted edges around the AL threaded mounting disk for the Zinc on the Rudder.  The circle on the Right is the filled in through hole we put in the Rudder to make it possible to remove the Prop Shaft without having to drop the Rudder.  Because we hope to not need to remove the Prop Shaft for many years this hole is filled in to provide a fully flush curved surface on the Rudder sides to maximize a smooth laminar flow of water over the Rudder.
PXL_20210125_113934869.MPSanding the first coat of epoxy filler on the Keel and Prop Tunnel into smooth large radius coves.
PXL_20210126_114206167….. and the Aft Depth Sounder transducer.
PXL_20210126_114219496….  and one of the 5 Sea Chests.
PXL_20210126_114321477By end of the week they had the last of the 5 coats of International epoxy primer rolled as you can see around the Bow Thruster Tunnel, another smaller Sea Chest intake and Zinc mounting disk up near the bow.
PXL_20210126_114402759Final coat of epoxy primer being rolled on Aft and we’ll see the application of the InterSleek 1100SR next week.

Grand Dame of Dyneema!

PXL_20210129_144503223.MPLest you should think that The Captain only lays down on the job, this will prove that she sometimes sits! 
PXL_20210129_144634649But Christine has become and expert Dyneema splicer after doing so many as she installs  all the Lifelines around the Main Deck.  This are the AL Stanchions with their Lifelines now in place on the Aft end of the Port/Left side.  The Tender will come On/Off this side so these 3 LifeLines have Pelican Hooks that are easy to release so we can then pull up the Stanchions and roll up the whole setup and stow when the Tender is aboard.
PXL_20210129_144622216Closer view of how these Pelican Hooks and Thimbles work.
PXL_20210129_144628144You start to appreciate how Christine’s Dyneema splicing expertise has developed so quickly when you start to count up all the splices required for each LifeLine in the system we’ve come up with.  On the far Right is an endless loop that wraps around the AL Stanchion through a small AL D-ring to keep it in place and a SS Thimble captured on the end.  Last step of this will be to lash the loop around the SS Thimble closed so that when it is undone the Thimble can’t come out.


Tylaska Dyneema AL rings donutsLooking down the LifeLines to the Left you can see another splice at the Left end of the Pelican Hook and then further Aft/Left two more around these Black anodized Donuts or Rings you can see further to the Left.  Christine leaves a gap of about 80-100mm / 3-4” between these two rings and then wraps multiple lashings between them to tension the life lines.  And of course each of these Rings require yet another splice!

INTERIOR UPDATES:

PXL_20210125_091302262.MPHilmi and Ramazan continued their work inside Möbius this past week and we also find more of Captain Christine’s fingerprints up here at the Main Helm where she and Hilmi have been working to install and connect Boat Computer #1 you see here on the Port/Left side of the Main Helm Chair.
PXL_20210125_091330861Its ultimate home will be inside this space behind the 50” Monitor on the outside and this AC/Heating Air Handler inside.
PXL_20210125_091339930This space is normally covered by this hinged Rosewood back with a recess for the adjustable mounting system for the 50” monitor that doubles as both our movie watching entertainment screen when on anchor and then one of 4 screens for boat data and navigation when underway.
PXL_20210126_075505032Down in the Guest Cabin Ramazan is completing the last of the Ado LVT vinyl plank flooring. 
PXL_20210126_075450320.MPWhile the smallest by surface area it has ELEVEN removeable sections above the bolt on tank access hatches below so this area is taking the most time.

Pull out Bed in the Upper Left and Christine’s Office desk on the Right.
PXL_20210127_110131943.MPSix of those removable floor sections all weighted down while the adhesive dries.
PXL_20210126_153010788.MPRemovable floor sections?

What removable floor sections?
PXL_20210129_095901473Ramzan then stepped up his game (sorry) by moving up to install the vinyl flooring on the steps leading up from the SuperSalon to the Aft Deck. 

Another tricky and time consuming bit of detail as each step has one of these handrail posts he needs to go around.
PXL_20210129_095827835Which, as you can see, he had no trouble doing eXtremely well!
And that’s a wrap for the week that was January 25-30, 2021.  Yikes!  The first month of 2021 gone already??? 

Well at least it puts us another week closer to LAUNCH so as with “being shafted” that is all a very good thing.

Thanks for joining us for yet another episode here at Möbius.World.  REALLY appreciate and value you doing so and please feel encouraged to add your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Hope to see you here again next week.

-Wayne


Mr. Gee is Cagey & Exhausting Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius Jan 11-15, 2021

Another busy week for Team Möbius as we all focus on getting her finished and ready for her Splash Day first kiss with the sea, which we are now counting in weeks rather than months or years, so exciting times here at Naval Yachts to be sure.  As is often the case near the end of an eXtremely big project and certainly at the end of Project Goldilocks, most of the work is on all those “small jobs” chasing down all the loose ends from previous work installing all the systems, cabinetry, propulsion, etc.  And as most of you would know from your work on projects it is the last 5% of a job that seems to often take 50% of the time!  However, good progress is being made and I will take you on a whirlwind tour through all the little things that got done this week which add up to be an eXtremely BIG deal as it gets us another week closer to Launch Date.

So strap yourself in and hang on for this week’s Show & Tell tour of the Good Ship Möbius for the week that was January 11-15, 2021.

HELMS:

Llebroc Upper Helm ChairYou may recall from reading previous posts that we have been very busy finishing off lots of those “little jobs” to complete the Upper and Lower Helm Stations and that continued this week. 

This is the Llebroc Tradewinds CX High Back helm chair that will be our perch when piloting Möbius from the Upper SkyBridge Helm and Nihat and Uğur got that all mounted and through bolted this past week.
PXL_20210111_133056567We needed to wait until the TreadMaster had all be glued down to all the aluminium floors in the SkyBridge and then we could mark out the exact location of the 6 through bolts for the base of the pedestal.
PXL_20210111_152910361.MPDirectly below this Upper Helm Chair base is this area above the Galley so Nihat removed the 50mm/2”  EPDM insulation foam to expose the area where the supporting plates and through bolts would go.


FastMount standard ClipThis is a good example of why all the panels on the ceilings and many on the walls are made to be easily removable by using FastMount clips which are the White dots you can clearly see against the Black ceiling framing in the photo above.  Being able to remove any panel in a few seconds is an eXtreme time saver for such jobs.
PXL_20210111_152902953There can be a tremendous amount of force exerted on that base when a good sized adult is perched way up on top of the Helm Chair in rough seas so Nihat & Uğur installed some 20mm AL plate on the underside of the AL floor plates and then ran the through bolts from the pedestal base to sandwich the whole assembly and create an eXtremely solid pedestal for this Upper Helm Chair.
PXL_20210111_152922589.MPAs is so often the case with these “little” jobs, all the time and work is in the preparation and the actual installation goes very quickly.  So once they had all the prep work done with the support plates and drilling the holes it didn’t take them long to torque down these six 316SS C’sunk bolts and the Upper Helm Pedestal was all done and ready for the adjustable base plate and slider of the chair to fit over the top of the AL piston you see here.  This piston has a powerful gas lift cylinder inside that makes it easy to raise/lower the Helm Chair about 30cm/12”.
PXL_20210111_133149816In front of the Upper Helm Chair, this custom made Switch Panel for all our external lights finally arrived and fit like a glove in the opening below the Standard Horizon GX600 VHF-AIS.
PXL_20210111_102538061Hilmi had already installed all the wires so it did not take him long to get all these switches wired up.  We tested out all the lights and everything worked just as planned.
PXL_20210111_064947231Such as these Green Navigation Lights that Hilmi is checking out here on the Starboard/Right side of the SkyBridge coaming.
PXL_20210111_065005679Red Nav Light on the Port side working just as well.

BTW, a fun way to remember the Red/Green orientation is “There’s no Red Port Left”  (thanks for the correction Max!)

TreadMaster on these side decks is all ready to be glued down which they also completed this past week.

PXL_20210111_133120077Christine and I installed the two 24” touch monitors as you saw last week and there are a few more “little jobs” need to be looked after but this Upper Helm Station is nearing completion now which has been great to see.
PXL_20210111_133406608Similar story down below at the Main Helm where we also installed the two 19” touch monitors last week and this Helm is now also getting close to finished.
PXL_20201123_080219974.MPThis is the Llebroc Bandera Series 2 Helm Chair which, similar to the Upper Helm Chair, needs to have its pedestal mounted and through bolted in the floor.
PXL_20210112_093059795We needed to wait until Ramazan had finished installing all the Ado LVT vinyl flooring and then layout the location of the solid block floor that had been installed here for the through bolts to go through the 50mm/2” thick insulated and heated floor. 

Drilling and installing these through bolts is a bit tricky due to all the cable trays filled with electrical cables running underneath this floor in the Basement, but we lowered the cable trays and drilled all the holes with no problem after lots of careful measurement.

This is where we left off on Friday so Uğur and Nihat will pick up here when we all get to work Monday morning.
PXL_20210112_093041739Just behind the Main Helm Chair we had to do the same kind of layout and prep for through bolting this Zwaardvis Triton Deluxe adjustable pedestal for the Dinette Table.
PXL_20210112_093055787In addition to the Up/Down adjustment of the pedestal itself you can see here how the Zwaardvis T-System XY slider bolts on top and allows us to move the table fore/aft and left/right by 200mm/8” which enables us to put the Rosewood table in the Goldilocks just right position for eating/working, lounging of made down into a bed.  The little Black unit on top will be fastened to the underside of the table and you just pull that Black lever and the cable releases the “brake” while you slide the table in the XY axis you want and then release to lock the table in place. 

Very KISSS – Keep It Simple Smart & Safe!
PXL_20210111_153157483.MPBy Friday Faruk, Orkan and Ali had finished up the remaining “little jobs” with the TreadMaster non-slip surfaces.  Both Side Decks and the front platform in front of the hinged Solar Panel bank is now all completed.
PXL_20210111_153121429.MPAs is this small area around the Lewmar EST65 Warping/Kedging winch.

OTHER ELECTRICAL JOBS

PXL_20210111_153126683Our head Sparkie Hilmi had a busy week as well. 

He installed the Black Foot Switch for the Warping/Kedging winch above, so one more little job checked off the punch list.
PXL_20210111_102527822Finished wiring up all the components in the Upper Helm Station.  Kobelt WalkAbout remote control box in the upper Left corner, Nogva CPP clutch controls below it and Horn, Engine Stop & Start buttons on the bottom.

Std Horizon GX6000 VHF-AIS top center with the External Light Switch panel below which we saw earlier.
PXL_20210111_133142729.MPRight of the VHF is the Vetus Bow Thruster joystick and the Furuno NAVPilot 711C below it.  Maxwell anchor windlass control upper Right with Kobelt 7170 Jog Lever below.  Round gauge on far upper Right is the Pitch angle of the CPP propeller and hiding under the plastic is the Kobelt 6501 electronic control head for the Gardner Throttle and Nogva CPP Pitch adjustment levers.
PXL_20210113_111533388Looking through the WT door off the Aft Deck and peering into the dark space above as you walk through into the SuperSalon, you might be able to make out the neat little alcove up above that Hilmi and Christine worked on this past week.
PXL_20210113_111509509Here is a closer view with the upholstered panel removed to show the components installed in this well protected space.  Far Left is the Axis M7104 Video Encoder that puts our non IP cameras onto the network,
PXL_20210113_111516129In the middle is one of several Planet Industrial 10/100TX Ethernet switches and the incredible Kingdel i9 9th gen mini computer that Christine put together to be our Boat Computer #2.

HOUSE BATTERY BANKS

PXL_20210115_130946525Yesterday (Friday 15th) Hilmi and I spent some time down in the Basement working to finish off the installation of the 24 FireFly Carbon Foam batteries which make up our 1800Ah 24V House Battery.
PXL_20210115_131014986.MPHilmi has all 24 batteries wired up in their 6S4P configuration where six 4V batteries are wired in Series to create four 24V @ 450Ah banks which in turn are wired in Parallel to create a single 24V @ 1800Ah House Battery which gives us a total capacity of 45kWh to power all the AC and DC circuits onboard.  While we can safely take these Carbon Foam batteries down to 20$ SOC State of Charge, we will typically not take them below about 50% SOC so as to maximize their cycle lifespan and still give us up to 900Ah or 21.6kWh to keep us safely and fully powered up at all times.
PXL_20210115_132643694Before we look after the last step of organizing and supporting all the cables, Hilmi, Ramazan and I worked on this very KISSS way of holding each of the 24 4Volt cells in solidly in place under all conditions.  Each 4V cell/battery weighs 43kg/95lbs and by wedging each battery in place using these composite foam pieces you see in these photos.
PXL_20210115_132707875Right beside Möbius, Naval is building a big fancy 20m catamaran out of very high tech composite materials and this foam board was all left over “scraps” that caught my curiosity so I tested out some samples and this stuff is awemazing! 

It is literally light as a feather and I can beat it with a sledge hammer and not put a dent in it!  I’ve tried soaking it in water, vinegar and acetone with no absorption or other affects so I had an Aha! moment and thought this was the Goldilocks solution for a KISSS battery hold down system you see here.
PXL_20210115_132654215Along the sides, while difficult to see here, a two stepped piece of composite foam snuggly wedges in place between the sides of each pair of batteries and the aluminium tank sides and the thicker upper stepped part holds the batteries down by the ledge along the outer edge of each battery case.
PXL_20210115_132650957Down the middle a T shaped piece of composite foam is wedged into the 40mm/1.6” air gap where the sides of the batteries meet.  If you look closely (click to enlarge any photo) at the foam piece on the far Left, you can see how the T cut out fits on top of the ledge on the Blue plastic battery case.  When the AL plate lids are bolted on top this will squeeze the batteries tight against the AL floor down at the 25mm ‘’/ 1’ thick Keel Bar

I’ll be back next week to show you how we have organized and tied down all these big 25mm2 / 4/0 cables and then bolt on the 6mm AL cover plates with gaskets to seal the whole battery compartment which is then vented with thermostatically controlled fans to keep the batteries cool and well vented.

LIFELINES!

PXL_20210114_133143233Christine has been working onboard Möbius every day for the past few weeks now and took on one of the larger jobs remaining; installing all our Dyneema Lifelines.  I’m not sure if she is holding on out of pride of her work here on the Aft Deck or to help keep her tired little body upright after a grueling week.

We are using Dyneema for all our lines and rigging as it just SO superior to standard lines and Stainless Steel twisted wire being stronger, safer, kinder to the hands, easy to inspect and monitor.  Christine is going to do a separate blog post here with all the details so I will leave you to read that when it goes up in a few days.


Being as pleased and proud of her as I am though, can’t resist just a few photos of her handiwork to whet your appetite for more.


PXL_20210113_114221872Simple eye splice where each Lifeline begins with this “Luggage Tag” style attachment to the 40mm/1.6” thick walled AL stanchion posts.
PXL_20210114_133300285The top Lifeline is 90cm / 36” above the deck and the bottom one is a custom Goldilocks Just Right height to help keep our stubby legged Barney the Yorkshire Terror onboard.
PXL_20210113_114244534Where the Dyneema Lifelines simply pass through a Stanchion these short lengths of 10mm / 3/8” AL pipe have been welded at the height of each of the 3 Lifelines.
PXL_20210114_133209301For Lifelines that we need to remove regularly, she splices a Pelican Hook on the other end with a simple endless loop around the end gate stanchion pipe.
PXL_20210114_133228050Along the length of each Lifeline, to provide adjustment and re-tensioning over time, Christine has spliced on two Black aluminium “donuts” and then lashed between the two with smaller diameter Dyneema.  This one is just temporary while we are testing out the layout but will give you an idea how this system works.

SuperSalon is Floored!

PXL_20210111_064335000Ramazan has quickly become a Master at installing the Ado LVT vinyl flooring we are covering all the floors in all three living compartments on Möbius.  For orientation of this photo I am standing about where the Main Helm chair is looking Aft at the stairs leading up to the Aft Deck.  Ramazan has about half of the Ado LVT vinyl planks installed on the Right side in front of the two door style 130L Fridges in the back and 2 70 liter drawer freezers in the foreground.  The bare plywood rectangular piece on Ramazan’s Left is the hinged hatch that lifts up to access the stairs down into the Basement under the whole SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20210111_064306051.MPHere is what it looks like from the opposite end, standing in that WT door off the Aft Deck looking forward to the Main Helm at the front of the SuperSalon.  Galley is partially visible on the far Right.
PXL_20210113_111549426.MPA few hours later and that Basement Hatch is almost fully covered and Ramazan did a fabulous job having it blend in almost invisibly to the rest of the floor.
PXL_20210112_125857110Main Helm and Dinette Table floors all laid down and I’ve started to lay out the locations for the pedestal bases of the Helm Chair and the Dinette pedestals.
PXL_20210112_125852600Flooring all done in the Galley now.
PXL_20210114_124241646With the LVT flooring all done in the Master Cabin and the SuperSalon, Ramazan transferred his attention to the Corridor and Guest Cabin area which will likely the the most time consuming as there are 10 tank access ports he needs to lay the flooring around.

Here in the Corridor that connects the stairs up at the top of the photo coming down from the SuperSalon, to the WT door into the Workshop which is where I’m standing to take this photo.  He pulled up the temporary plywood covering that has been covering this area so he could level off the tops of the Blue rigid foam board for the final marine plywood to go on next.  Easy to see how PEX tubing for the In-Floor heating is snaking through the foam and the aluminium tape helps reflect the heat upward through the plywood.
PXL_20210115_105407266.MPPlywood is now screwed in place to the wood frames underneath and Ramazan has started to lay down the Ado LVT vinyl planks.

Stay tuned for next week’s episode where he will likely finish off all the vinyl flooring.

Mr. Gee gets Cagey!


Mr. Gee cage   exhaust support modelYou may recall from last week’s Progress Update that I had designed this pipe rail or cage setup attached to the four motor mounts I had designed months ago and work continued on this week.
PXL_20210105_132404350Here is where we left off last Weekly Update with the front and rear rails or “staples” that Uğur and Nihat had installed.
PXL_20210111_063820393On Monday, Uğur and Nihat finished off the “cage” by bolting on the two lengthwise tie rods to complete this very rigid cage around Mr. Gee.  As with so many elements on Möbius this serves multiple purposes, one is to provide a safety element when we are doing our hourly engine room checks on a passage and a sudden lurch in the boat’s movement might cause you to loose your balance and reach out to grab one of the hot or moving parts of Mr. Gee.  Now this “cage” provides you with a safe cool hand hold all the way around.


PXL_20210111_063824172.MPSecond purpose of this pipe cage is to provide the frame for the four support rods that need to go up to support the dry stack components of the Halyard exhaust system.  These four “ears” or tabs have been welded on to provide the lower attachment point for those four SS support rods.
PXL_20210114_134024345Cihan and Mesut fabricated four of these SS support rods in no time by welding some SS slugs into the end of each SS pipe and threading it for the Heim joints that would go in each end.
PXL_20210114_134033887I am just test fitting the Heim joints here so the SS lock nuts are not yet in place but you can see how this simple setup creates a Goldilocks support rod that is of course all very KISSS Keep it Simple Smart & Strong.
PXL_20210115_101831712Here is what it looked like as we shut down yesterday.  Next week Cihan will install the front two supports but already the exhaust dry stack is eXtremely solid and I can barely make it move when I grab it and shake it for all I’m worth.
PXL_20210114_150011125Two other important “little” jobs Cihan and I worked on this past week were the mounting of the Morse cables to the Nogva CPP Pitch lever and the throttle lever on Mr. Gee, and the solenoid for the shutoff lever on Mr. Gee. 

I whipped up this little sketch on my new favorite drawing board; cardboard!  No work of art and rather embarrassing for a former Draughting/Drafting instructor but it works well to outline my basic ideas and communicate them with Cihan with no problems given my poor Turkish language skills.


PXL_20210114_143123672I just love working with Cihan and everyone on Team Möbius because it is such a collaborative relationship.  I did that initial sketch you see above and discuss the key parameters with Cihan and ask him to run with it and build whatever he thinks will work best and is easiest for him to build.  This is the modified design he came up with and fabricated in minutes out of some 10mm / 3/8” aluminium plate.
PXL_20210115_101941176The purplish colored Morse cable on top here transfers the mechanical movement from the Kobelt electronic Actuator box up above on the ER wall down to thee throttle lever on Mr. Gee to change his RPM and then the 24V solenoid underneath moves the engine shut off lever below.

A similar Morse cable comes down from the other side of the Kobelt Actuator to move the Pitch control lever on the Nogva CPP Servo Reduction gearbox but I failed to get some photos of that.
PXL_20210115_101947000Her is a better angle of the finished result of the Throttle cable on top and the Shut off solenoid below. 

  • Two more jobs checked off the list!
    PXL_20210115_101923504Another prime example of how these “little” jobs take a BIG amount of time was finishing off this very busy area around Mr. Gee’s oil filter.  The bronze block on the Left has four fittings in it, the top one I’ve installed one of the two direct oil pressure gauges and then the Black line below it takes the pressurized oil directly to the valves in the cylinder head.  The bottom two outlets I have just plugged off for now but will soon have an oil pressure alarm sensor installed.
    PXL_20210115_101848653On the Right side of the big cast Oil Filter canister is the Black oil pressure adjustment valve and then that beautiful bronze oil temperature thermometer and a 2nd oil pressure gauge on the far Right.  The reason for two oil pressure gauges is that the one on the Right measures the oil pressure when it is highest coming directly out of the oil pump inside the crankcase whereas the one on the far Left measures the oil pressure at the far end of the line just before it gets pumped back into the crankcase.  This setup allows me to instantly see the difference from start to finish of the oil pressure to the engine and enables me to quickly spot any problem long before it advances.
  • There are also digital equivalents in the form of temperature and pressure sensors that will put this data onto our N2K network where I can log it by the minute and have a full history of all these metrics being logged every second of every day.


And that’s a wrap for the week of January 11-15, 2021 people!  Thanks so much for getting through yet another one of Wayne’s rambling Weekly Progress Updates and in spite of my pathetically long response time to them, PLEASE do add your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

I hope to see you again next week.

-Wayne