E-bikes and Flying Fish

Sheesh!  Half way through the month of August already!

Time for a brief update on what’s been happening with us and Möbius over the first two weeks of August.

Weather here continues to surprise us with how ideally cool it is.  This past week has seen the daily temperatures drop a few more degrees from their previous norms of about 32C / 90F down to about 28C / 82F as I sit typing this at about 3pm on Sunday.  Evenings and mornings are even cooler and with the constant Meltemi winds blowing through the boat sleeping is very comfy and mornings are starting to feel downright chilly!  Not sure why this area is experiencing such relatively cool summer when the rest of Europe, the UK and many other parts of the world are seeing record high temperatures but we’ll just enjoy and be grateful that we’ve got such ideal conditions.

Here is what else we’ve been up to the past two weeks.

Update from Kalymnos Greece

IMG_1239_thumbChristine and I have settled into a nice rhythm here onboard Möbius and in this lovely south end of Kalymnos Island that I showed you around in the last post.
Kalymnos set in larger map_thumb[1]If you did not see that post, this map will help orient you as to where the small island of Kalymnos is at (red pin) in the bigger picture of this Eastern end of the Med.
Kalymnos sat view_thumbThis satellite view of the island of Kalymnos (click to enlarge any photo) will help you see how arid and mountainous it is.  Möbius is the south harbour at the Red pin.  To give you a sense of scale, the coast road allows you to circumnavigate the whole island in just 68 km/42 miles.  So not too big which suits us just fine. 

Christine Update

IMG_1204Christine continues to be very dedicated to getting her knee back to full working order and goes for a swim each day where the surprisingly brisk ocean water is the perfect medium for her physio exercises.  Progress is slower than she’d like but improving.  This is but one of may swimming spots she gets to chose from every day.
IMG_1258And almost all of them have a beachside taverna so she gets to enjoy a Freddo Cappuccino and water in the shade when she finishes her exercises.  Thanks to her E-bike that she got before we left Turkey she is able to get to pretty much any of the swim spots on this end of the island in less than 10 minutes and with no strain on her knee, so all good.
IMG_1251The town itself is small but lively with daily arrivals of Turkish Gullets and other sail boats as well as lots of ferries that bring people to and from the surrounding islands or as far away as Athens.  Makes for good people watching including this very salty dog of a Captain.
IMG_1253As with most small towns though there are some less savory characters like this one who manage to sneak in when no one is watching.
IMG_1212In addition to swimming, Christine loves to use her E-bike which she calls her “Freedom machine” to explore further afield and she has been super impressed by how well the “pedal assist” of her trusty E-bike allows her to climb even the steep hills that are the norm everywhere on the island once you leave the waters edge.
IMG_1230Her explorations down random little roads and alleys continue to produce finds like this old church.
IMG_1229Which can often reveal surprise treasures such as this interior of the building above if you go up the stairs and push the door open.
When not out swimming or exploring, Christine is hard at work in her office every day here aboard Möbius as she starts doing the heavy mental lifting of creating a whole new set of characters and timelines for the newest book she is writing.  Stay tuned for more on that as it develops.

Wayne’s World

Meanwhile I am kept very busy with the combination of remaining boat jobs on the list and fixing the inevitable gremlins that pop up.  Our Kabola diesel boiler suddenly stopped earlier this week after working flawlessly every day for the past year and a half so trying to sort that out.  For now I’ve just turned on the 220V element in the Calorifier (hot water tank) for daily dishes and showers.

One of the unfinished boat jobs this week has been finishing building the paravanes so we can test them out when we next head out to sea. 
paravanes1As you may recall from previous posts, Paravanes are passive stabilizers which work by “flying” about 6m / 20’ below the water.  These help keep the boat level by resisting forces trying to roll the boat from side to side.  As the boat rolls, one of the paravanes or “fish” or “birds” as they are sometimes called, resists being pulled upward while the other paravane dives down and sets up for its turn to resist being pulled up as the roll forces go to the other side.

PXL_20220618_144026919The paravanes themselves, are suspended from Dyneema lines (super strong synthetic rope) that hang off of long booms extending out from each side of the boat at about 45 degrees.
LarryM fish in water with retreival lineHere is a paravane in action from another boat.

If you’d like more details on our Paravane setup check out THIS blog post and THIS one from back in June when I was rigging the booms and starting to build the paravanes.

PXL_20220809_114817402   Before we left Finike in Turkey I had finished shaping and painting the 20mm / 3/4” plywood “wings” for the two paravanes and bolting in the T-bracket where the line goes up to the boom. 
PXL_20220809_114751558Now I needed to cut these two aluminium plates to act as vertical fins that will help keep the paravane tracking parallel to the hull.
PXL_20220809_114751558Pretty straightforward to cut with my jig saw and shape with my angle grinder.
PXL_20220809_114815059Now just need to drill holes for the bolts that will attach the vertical fins to the T-bracket and the paravane wings.
PXL_20220809_124532184.MPLike this.  The holes along the top of the T-bracket are where the line going up to the boom attaches and provide adjustments for the angle the paravane will slice through the water at different speeds and conditions.
PXL_20220809_134200156Final step was to bolt on these two zinc weights that weigh about 15kg / 33lbs and create the nose of the paravane.  This forward weight ensures that the fish will dive down quick and smooth when not being pulled upward.  When the boat rolls the other way, the line pulls up which straightens out the fish and immediately start resisting the roll.  Rinse and repeat!
PXL_20220809_142948848_thumbHere is the finished pair of paravanes all ready for testing, though I will probably put on another coat of epoxy paint for good measure.

Next week I’ll finish the rigging and get the lines attached from the ends of the booms to each paravane.


IMG_1070Not too bad a spot to be in and we are eXtremely grateful for just how fortunate we are to be here.

I’ll be back with more as our time races by here in Kalymnos and hope you enjoy these briefer updates.  Let me know by sending your comments and opinions in the “Join the Discussion” box below and I’ll be back with more as soon as I have it.
-Wayne


Close but ….. Update Jan 31-Feb 5, 2022 XPM78-01 Möbius

As has been the norm for most updates and perhaps life in general I guess, this will be a mix of good news and bad for all you faithful followers (thanks to you all!)  In the good news column this week’s update will be mercifully short compared to some of the novel length ones I have been writing of late but the related not so good news is that this update will be disappoint all of you who have been anxiously awaiting to see and hear Mr. Gee roar back to his third new lease on life. 

The finiteness of time is always the challenge it seems, and especially so on a boat it seems where there are so many things on the To Do list and so little time to get all of them done.  I’m pretty sure most of you have your own version of this dilemma, which is actually a good thing in itself in that who would ever want to have NOTHING left on their To Do list?!?!?  Not me at least.

So this past week has been filled with a litany of To Do list items which too precedent over those in Mr. Gee’s Engine Room (ER) though I certainly did not ignore him completely. 

Getting Mr. Gee Ready for Life #3

PXL_20220130_110112852If you have been following along, here is what things looked like in the ER when I left you in the last Update.  Mr. Gee was back “in bed” with his four “feet” now resting firmly on the wide 25mm thick AL Engine Beds that run down each side of the Engine Bay.  Now came all the “little things” that have to be reconnected, adjusted and tested before he is ready to start.

As many of you can relate to, the “little things” in life can often take most of the time and are of the highest importance and that is very much the case here.
PXL_20201027_161424326For example, before I can fasten the Mr. Gee’s four feet to the Engine Beds, I need to precisely align these two flanges.  The bright Red one on the Right is attached to the end of the Nogva Prop Shaft and the darker Burgundy on it mates to is the Output flange coming out of the Nogva servo gear box on the far Left.
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualThese two flanges must be perfectly aligned axially, meaning both side to side and top to bottom with no more than 5/100th or 0.05mm/0.002”  which for reference is about the thickness of a human hair.
To do this, I need to remove the eight hardened bolts which hold the two flanges together, keep the two flanges up against each other and then measure the gap all around where the flanges meet to make sure there is ideally no gap or at least no more than 0.05mm.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPThis is done using a feeler gauge you see in my hand here which is a thin piece of steel that is of an exact thickness.  It was close but a bit too big on the Right side (3 O’clock) so I then go up to the front of Mr. Gee and pry his feet over to the Right just a wee bit and go recheck the size of the gap.  If there is a gap top to bottom then you have to use the nuts on the motor mounts to tilt the engine/gearbox assembly to remove the gap.
PXL_20210629_080936243As you might imagine, it takes quite a few trips back and forth to get the two flanges completely flush with each other and once done I could replace the 8 hardened bolts and tighten them down in stages to their final toque of 160 NM/120 FtLbs, which is VERY tight.
PXL_20201112_065937889With Mr. Gee & Miss Nogva now perfectly in position, I could install the two hardened bolts in each of his four “feet” and torque these down to the very grunt worthy 225 NM/166 FtLbs.

Note, this is a photo from last year before I had drilled the holes in the Engine Beds so this time I just needed to reinsert the bolts into the existing holes.
Gardner & Nogva mounts screen shotHere is an overview shot from my Fusion 360 screen which is what I used to design all the mounts.  Each side has two feet/mounts for Mr. Gee and one for the Nogva.
PXL_20220131_093700868With Mr. Gee now in his final resting spot I could reattach the wet exhaust system.  Wet refers to the fact that sea water is injected into the exhaust gas which removes both noise and heat from the exhaust and allows the use of much easier to handle rubber exhaust hose to take the exhaust gasses out of the boat.

The Blue/Red is special silicone hose where the stainless Mixing Elbow bends downward and mixes the sea water with the exhaust.  The smaller SS pipe you can see pointing up here, is where the hose bringing the sea water attaches.
PXL_20220131_093706908Here is a peek inside the mixing elbow where you can see all the holes around the outer SS circumference where the water sprays evenly into the exhaust gasses.
PXL_20220131_155437345Now I could hoist the whole exhaust pipe assembly into place sliding the Blue silicone hose overtop of the angled input pipe on the large cylindrical Silencer/Separator in the top Separator of the ER.

Once in place I could also reattach the four SS supports which connect the exhaust system to the front and rear roll bars around Mr. Gee.  This has worked out eXtremely well by keeping the exhaust system very tightly in place with no transfer of noise of vibration into the hull it never touches.


PXL_20220131_1554136033” SS pipe attaches to the exhaust manifold on the Aft Starboard/Right end of Mr. Gee and then carries the hot exhaust gasses up and over to the SS mixing elbow and into the Silencer/Separator.
PXL_20220131_155420518The Black rubber exhaust hose curving down from the Silencer on the Right carries the now cooled and quiet gasses out of the ER and across to the AL exhaust pipe in the hull.

The sea water drains out of the bottom of the White separator and into the vertical Sea Chest where it exits out of the boat back into the ocean.


It has proven to be an eXcellent exhaust system; simple, efficient and quiet.  I’ve used a Silencer/Separator combo unit rather than a more traditional “Lift Muffler” as this design has almost no power robbing back pressure and no “sploosh sploosh” as water from lift mufflers create when exhaust and water both exit out the side of the boat.


PXL_20220202_143954022Time at last to install the new oil filter and fill it up with clean new oil.
PXL_20220202_152612105The rest of Mr. Gee’s 28 Liters/ 7.4 USG of engine oil I add by pouring into the two cylinder heads to thoroughly douse all the valves in clean new oil which then drains down to fill up the oil sump/pan.
PXL_20220202_152645743Lots more “little jobs’ such as reconnecting the six large Red cables to each of the two 500 amp Electrodyne alternators you can see on the top and bottom Left side here. 


The list of connections is much longer of course and valve clearances need to be set, fuel pump and injectors primed, etc. but each one takes Mr. Gee one step closer to first start up.
Unfortunately I ran out of time this week at this point so I will need to leave you hanging here and pick up again next week.

Engine Control Box

I do my best to “discipline” myself when doing boat jobs to always try to improve on whatever system I’m working on such that it is better than before I started.  Such was the case in completing this latest rebuild of Mr. Gee where I wanted to build and install a much better and safer Engine Control Box.

PXL_20220205_103827384.MPHere is what I came up with.  Quite simple but a bit time consuming to build.  I started with a standard IP65 (waterproof) Grey plastic junction box and cut openings for an Engine Hour meter (top), Red STOP button, power “ignition” switch Left, Green START button Right and digital Tachometer on bottom.
PXL_20220205_103836374.MPThe junction box provided a cool, dry protected spot to make all the connections for these controls so I used these handy junction blocks to make secure connections between all the wires.
PXL_20220206_111545538.MPThen I mounted the whole box up high just outside the ER door. 

I’ve done my best to reserve the Engine Room to have ONLY the engine inside it;  no other equipment, no batteries, no fuel tanks, etc.  An ER is a great place for the engine but the hotter temperatures and vibration is not so kind to things like batteries, equipment, etc.


PXL_20220206_111615811Here is a better shot of the Control Box in the upper center as you look forward down the Port/Left side of the Workshop to the WT door at the far end which separates the Workshop & ER from the interior of the boat.

By mounting this control box outside the ER followed the same thinking and added a safety element in that I could quickly shut down the engine in the unlikely event of seeing a fire inside and not needing to open the ER door.
PXL_20220206_111811733For orientation on how the ER and the new Control Box is mounted, here is the opposite view looking Aft from that WT Door toward the WT door leading out onto the Swim Platform at the far Left end. 
PXL_20220206_111701216.MPThe whole Control Box setup and other wiring is still very much a work in progress as you can see with this perspective from inside the ER looking out through the door on the Left.  In the upper center of this photo you can see how the wires from the Control Box have been led through a hole in the White AlucoBond walls lining the ER. 

Off to the right I’ve mounted a new BlueSea junction box which provides me with 12 individually fused connections for each circuit.
PXL_20220206_111654233.MPNext week I will be working on making all the connections for circuits such as the Start/Stop solenoids, Sea Water flow alarm, hot water circulation pump from engine to calorifier, engine sensors for pressures and temperatures and connections for the field wires from the alternators to the WakeSpeed 500 remote rectifiers and regulators.

I’ve had great success using these BS junction boxes on previous boats and they do a great job of making secure, neat easily accessed connections and fuses.
There were a LOT of other To Do list items commandeering my time this past week but I’ll spare you from all those gory details and leave off here to be continued next week for those of you brave enough to return for more!

My sincere thanks to those who made it to the end of yet another “brief” update from your cub reporter aboard the Good Ship Möbius.  I value all the comments and questions you leave in the “Join the Discussion” box below eXtremely highly so thanks in advance for all those contributions and I hope you will join me here again for continuing adventures as Christine and I work at getting Möbius and ourselves fully sea worthy and ready to throw off the dock lines and head back out to eXplore the world by sea.

-Wayne



Putting Mr. Gee Back to (his engine) Bed! Weekly Update 30 Jan 2022 XPM78-01 Möbius

Thanks to the many of you who responded to the “mystery novel” that I turned last week’s update into and for putting up with my amateurish mystery writing skills.  I was quite taken aback but most appreciative of how many of you enjoyed along with what I hope to be the final chapter in the great Serial Oil Pressure Killer series here on Möbius.World.

This last week most of my time has been spent putting Humpty Dumpty aka Mr. Gee all back together again with his new crankshaft, bearings and now FLAT oil pipework fittings installed and you can read all about that below.  He is now back to ‘’bed” resting on his anti vibration mounts and I’m working my way through the rest of the assembly and adjustments so I can bring him back to life purring away in his Engine Room.  If all goes well I should be able to share the first start up in next week’s update so do stay tuned for that.

Picking Up Where We Left Off

In my focus on telling the long and winding tale about tracking down the real oil pressure killer I skipped over most of the process of reinstalling the new crankshaft, oil pump, oil cooler tube and all the many other parts that I had disassembled so I will catch you up with al that now.

One of the only things we are not so fond of about our years here in Turkey is how much time, money and energy it takes to get things shipped into or out of the country.  Not completely sure why this is and we do sometimes have things all go very well, but most often it is quite a PITA.  Such was the case with getting the previous crankshaft sent back to Gardner Marine in England to be reground and then getting the new crank, oil pump, cooler tube and O-rings sent back to us here in Finike marina. 
PXL_20220111_080324835

With the help of our ever resourceful “Turkish Fixer” Alaaddin, the latest crate finally arrived about two weeks ago.
PXL_20220111_081110154.MPThe crankshaft alone weighs about 100kg/220lbs but Christine and I were able to get it out of the van and down the ramp onto the swim platform on Möbius without it going overboard.
PXL_20220111_082111680and then slowly get him down the steps into the Workshop.
PXL_20220111_082610700There are a number of parts that attach to the front end of the crankshaft such as a large disk vibration damper, triple row timing chain cog, roller bearings, etc. and these all need to be pressed or bolted onto the crankshaft.  So I propped it up against the center workbench to do all this work.
PXL_20220111_082909767This tag confirms the sizes of the Main Bearing and Connecting Rod or “Big End” bearing journals after they have been freshly reground and then the bearings are oversized by this same amount to match.

Protective corrugated cardboard is wrapped around each journal to protect the finely ground surfaces during shipping and installation.
PXL_20220115_143945288To prevent the crankshaft from moving fore and aft there are two pairs of Thrust Bearings that need to allow no more than 0.006 – 0.009” of end play so you need to fit these to a newly ground crankshaft to get the exact fit.  My good ole drill press often doubles as a vertical milling machine so I was able to use it again here to mill down each Thrust Bearing to just the right thickness.
PXL_20210912_082031223I could do a dry fit of this and check the gap with feeler gauges while the crank was out of the engine and then once it was in place I could double check with a dial gauge as you see here.  I forcefully tap the crank fully forward to zero the gauge and then fully aft to read the total endwise travel.  Reading was about 0.0065” or “six and a half thou” which is just right.
PXL_20220117_112447003Once I had the damper, roller bearings and chainwheel cog fully mounted I could start to carefully pull the whole assembly into the Engine Room.
PXL_20220117_112715308A bit like an inch worm’s progress, I just took it a step at a time.  It was probably now approaching 140kg/300lbs but I could lift one end by hand and so I put in some plywood ramps to help me slide the crank slide into the ER ………
PXL_20220117_113105187…… then inch it over under the anxiously awaiting Mr. Gee who was “hanging in there”.
PXL_20220117_114830108I rigged up a set of 6:1 blocks at the front and rear of the engine using Dyneema that I could wrap around the ends of the crankshaft and allow me to gradually pull it up into place.
PXL_20220117_123704553To make sure the large hardened steel studs that clamp the main bearings in place don’t touch and damage the ground surfaces, I wrapped the threads with lots of duct tape and then carefully peeled off the corrugated cardboard covers.
PXL_20220117_091641718Over on the workbench, I cleaned and prepped the main bearing shells in their big cast AL bearing caps.
PXL_20220118_153449942Each of the AL bearing caps are press fit into the solid AL crankcase so I used a hydraulic jack to push them into place and then the cast iron Bridges slide over the two studs and the nuts are torqued down.

FYI, the small oval surface you see machined on each Bridge is where the infamously “bowed” fittings with the O-rings bolt in place.
PXL_20220118_153500367Once I had the crankshaft bolted in place I could very carefully lower each Connecting Rod down onto their journals and bolt their bearing caps in place with the four bolts on each one.


Torqueing all these nuts down has to be done in a specific pattern as you progress through four different stages of increasing torque so that they are fully tightened and clamp the crank bearings precisely round.
PXL_20220121_154843715Crankshaft is now fully in place with all cylinders attached and turning easily so I now turned my attention to installing the very critical timing chain and the hand crank chainwheel and water pump/alternator cogged belt pulleys on the front end.
PXL_20220122_132948823Small and Light are never found in the same sentence with Gardner so I used the same inch work technique to get the massive solid cast AL oil pan/sump moved into the ER and in place under Mr. Gee.

PXL_20220122_151821143I was able to reuse the 6:1 blocks and some webbing at the front and rear of the sump to pull it up into place and get it all aligned to slide onto the oil pump tube and the studs that attach the sump to the crankcase.


PXL_20220124_105220238The flywheel is the most massive of all, not sure of its exact weight but I can tell you that it takes four burly guys to pick it up and it is all I can do to tip it upright when it is on the ground  Fortunately the 6:1 blocks help me work smarter not harder and so once I got Mr. Gee pulled into the right position I was able to easily lift this beast up and into precise position to slide over the 6 end studs on the crankshaft.
PXL_20220124_132135883With the flywheel torqued down I could now mount the aft half of its housing and then bolt on the large mounting brackets I had designed for the anti vibration “feet” or mounts to attach to on either side.
PXL_20220125_135708263After carefully repositioning the overhead steel beams spanning the ER hatch up above, I was able to now lower Mr. Gee’s feet onto the Engine Beds for what he and I both fervently hope is the LAST time for a LONG time!
CentaMax coupling photoAnd now the wrestling match begins as I coax all of Mr. Gee aft to engage the big rubber cogs on the CentaMax torsion coupling on the Nogva input shaft to the matching AL housing on the Flywheel. 
PXL_20220127_094910030

The blocks help me take off some of the weight and then lots of elbow grease and pry bars allow me to slide Mr. Gee aft little by little.  Here I now have it all lined up with the cogs just engaged.  You can see the 3cm gap that I still have to slide Mr. Gee aft to fit tight against the Brown Nogva case.
PXL_20220130_110112852Done!  Mr. Gee and Miss Nogva are now bolted back together and remarried for their new life together.
PXL_20220127_150433102Next up is this new bit of engineering art and science from Gardner that was in the crate with the crankshaft.  This is the copper engine oil cooler pipe where the oil is pumped through on its own circuit with its own oil pump.  The  “dimpled” pipe creates more surface area for the cooling sea water to flow around and extract out the heat from the oil as it flows through the tube.
PXL_20220127_150450223Too bad this copper beauty has to be hidden away when I slide it into this cast Bronze housing but I’ve done my best to polish up the housing and give it a clear epoxy coating to keep it looking great for years to come.  Who says you can’t have a bit of “bling” on a Gardner?!
PXL_20220129_114514899Here is the engine oil cooler all reassembled.  The cast Bronze housing on the closest end is where the oil enters and then runs through that dimpled tube inside and comes out the far end where it then drains back into the pan all nice and cool. 

Sea water is pumped into the flanged fitting you see lying open in the near end here and then it flows inside the square cast Bronze housing and out the large diameter copper pipe elbow you can see on the far end.
PXL_20220129_114519330Looking into that hole in the flange you see above, you can see the copper dimpled tube inside.
PXL_20220130_110125103Sorry for the poor photo but if you look closely you can see the Bronze oil cooler now installed along the side of Mr. Gee on the left side of this photo. 

I then connected all the white water hoses you see on the Right side here to various parts of Mr. Gee.  Some of these carry fresh water to the heat exchanger which is like the radiator in a car or truck but uses sea water to cool rather than air.  Other hoses cary salt water in/out of the engine oil cooler and the heat exchangers and the water pump.  You can see through the clear lid on one of the sea water strainer in the mid Right side.
PXL_20220130_110145440Big Black 5” Exhaust hose now reconnected to the large White water separator/silencer in the top Left corner and then down and out the ER where it connects to the AL exhaust pipe welded into the hull above the WL.
And that’s where we are at as of now (Jan 30th 2022) and where I will pick up with you again next week.  Lots more parts and systems to reconnect and install but if all goes well I hope to be able to bring you a short video of Mr. Gee starting up first crank as he usually does and let you all hear the sweet sounds of a Gardner 6LXB purring away.

Thanks for joining and for your comments and questions typed into the “join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne

The Joys of Deafening Silence! XPM78-01 Möbius LACK of Progress Update July 6-24 2021

Just a relatively short update for all of you that have been wondering about the “deafening silence” for the past 3 weeks from your more typically ebullient and brevity challenged author.  In case you missed the ending of my last posting, Christine and I flew up to Istanbul to meet our daughter Lia, hubby Brian and our two granddaughters Brynn (7) and Blair (5) as they got off their non stop plane ride from LAX to spend THREE WEEKS with us!  This would be a grand gift at any time but having not been able to get together for almost two years now, this was a HUGEY big gift! 

And a jam packed three weeks it was as we shared the Turkey we have come to know and love with them AND got to host them for the first real passage on Möbius!  Christine will be posting a bit more about our wonderful two day trip with the six of us aboard Möbius as we cruised the awemazing coastline from Antalya to Finike and here are just a few photos from our other adventures in planes, trains, automobiles AND hot air balloons!

PXL_20210706_062324614We walked and ate our way throughout the truly world class city of Istanbul for the first three days and this is just one of our many Turkish kahvaltı, aka breakfasts.
PXL_20210713_134952413.MPShort flight back from Istanbul to Antalya, test run for our new mariners with an overnight anchor at the nearby Rock Island to celebrate Brynn’s 7th Birthday!

See Christine’s post for much more about all this.

Thumbs up from all the crew and so we headed out for the first actual passage on Möbius.
PXL_20210713_151553498.MPSlipped into this little spot that the girls dubbed as “Mermaid Cove” for another night on anchor and lots of swimming.
PXL_20210712_113310631.MPOnward to some land based adventures, we went white water rafting in Köprülü Canyon National Park which is about 90 minutes from from where we lived in Antalya.
PXL_20210716_150115938.MPSwimming through the thermal mineral …….
Pamukkale pools …….  pools of Pamukkale
PXL_20210717_150135123Climbing through the ruins of Sagalossos dating back to 600 BCE.
PXL_20210720_085859596.MPThree nights in our two Cave Hotel rooms which were literally carved into the volcanic rock cliffs in Cappadocia.
PXL_20210719_020252306Up the next morning at 3AM to catch the sunrise in …..
PXL_20210719_021259004……. our very own Hot Air Balloon.
PXL_20210719_021909039Floating over the otherworldly “Fairy Chimneys” of Cappadocia
PXL_20210719_024855169.MP90 minutes went by SO fast!
PXL_20210719_034145291.MPUntil we gently touched down with the expert touch of …….
PXL_20210719_034549327.MP……  our favorite pilot Hakan (Black shirt far Left) from our previous ride with him 2 years ago for a champagne finish!
We bid our family adieux for their return flight to IST and then on to LAX the next morning and Christine and I drove the 9 hour trip back to Möbius.


Finike marinaWhere we had left her peacefully tied up in Finke marina which will be our home port for the rest of this year.
Whew!  We have spent the weekend savoring all these newest family memories and catching our breath from the wonderful whirlwind that our life has been for the past three weeks, indeed the past three years! 

Tomorrow (Monday here) we will renew our efforts to get through the long and seemingly growing list of jobs to do in order to get Möbius fully sea worthy and ready for our next adventures.  So we will resume our regular programming here on Mobius.World and do our best to continue to entertain and inform you about our ongoing adventures aboard the good ship Möbius.

Please tune in again next week for the next chapter and THANK YOU SO MUCH for your continued interest and comments.  Be sure to add more in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne
 


Merry Christmas to ALL in Möbius.World!

I thought it best to bring you this message and update all on its own and keep it separate from this weeks XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 21-25 Dec. 2020 which will follow shortly.  Hope you enjoy

Especially for all our friends and family who join us in celebrating Christmas as the crazy year that was 2020 winds down, Christine and I want to take the time to send ALL of you who join us here in Mobius.World our most eXtreme best wishes and share some of the joy that accompanies this holiday season no mater what has gone on in the months before and during. 

While Christine and I were deeply disappointed to not have set sail last year and that we were not able to enjoy Christmas 2020 as we would have wished, surrounded by our family, friends, children and Grandchildren, we were still able to be with them via modern mediums that made us feel a bit less far away.  And we both feel truly grateful to have each other to go through all we have together and that we have been able to remain happy and healthy through out the whole year. 

No matter how and whatever happens, we ARE surrounded by our friends, family and nothing but LOVE!  Could we be any more fortunate?  I don’t think so!


PXL_20201225_060308661

Oh, and did I mention that Santa found us two turkeys in Turkey with no problem again this year, which believe it or not is our fourth Xmas in Turkey and our eighth Xmas together.
PXL_20201225_053923306Mrs. Santa was eXtremely generous this year with not only her kisses BUT also with her gifts! 
PXL_20201227_125503610I am still in disbelief of the apparent and serious error in Santa’s bookkeeping which somehow misplaced MY name at the very top of his Good Boy list which resulted in me unwrapping THIS awemazing new bit of kit on Christmas morning!


PXL_20201227_125545888Christine and I have been lusting after a drone for over six years or more but when we sold Learnativity our previous 52’ sailboat, we kept telling ourselves that it would be smart to wait until Möbius was finished and we really had the use case for a drone. 
PXL_20201227_130932131Apparently that time is NOW and boy was it ever worth the wait! 

This is the latest model from DJI the Mini 2 and we are both still shaking our heads in disbelief of what this truly MINI drone is capable of:

  • It weighs a scant 249 grams which makes it just below the legal limit where you need to have a license to fly it, though we will get ours anyway.
  • Captures 4k video at 30 Frames/sec and 100Mbs
  • Shoots 12MP photos in JPEG + RAW
  • Can fly for 31 minutes on one battery charge and up to 16 m/s = 36MPH/58km/hr
  • Flies in 29-38km/hr wind (gee why would that be important to us?)
  • Controller has a range of up to 10km

OK, I’ll stop gushing now but YES! it is an eXtremely eXciting new toy for both of us!


PXL_20201227_131128787

How Mrs. Santa managed to get this delivered to me her in Turkey and before Xmas will remain one of life’s little mysteries but this is one VERY happy little Christmas elf right now.

Timing is perfect as we now have a drone for a month or more so we can get all our licenses and permits to fly legally and get in some practice time before we launch and take off in Möbius with this little guy to capture all our new adventures from above and all around.


PXL_20201227_134053937Oh, and when I said I had been mistakenly put at the very TOP of Santa’s Good Boy list, I wasn’t kidding because this even came with DJI’s “Fly More kit” which includes:

     *  a very nice and equally mini carrying bag

     *  3 batteries,

     *  a super smart 18W USB-C charger that is a 2way general purpose USB device charger

     *  3 sets of extra prop blades

WOWSA!!  But who am I to doubt Santa and Mrs. Santa so I will just say THANK YOU!!!


Therefore let this serve as an early warning that you will soon be seeing LOTS of video footage shot from the unique vantage point of this newest member of our family on Möbius.  Stay tuned as the adventure continues from above once we set out to sea the world from our new floating home mv Möbius.

Both Christine and myself want to wish all of you an eXtremely Happy Holiday season however you chose to celebrate it and we will be back to you next week with more best wishes as we all say farewell to 2020 and start ringing in 2021.

– Christine & Wayne + Barney and Ruby

Much Ado about “T” Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius 15-18 December 2020

A bit of a slow week progress wise on XPM78-01 Möbius this past week as our work week was unexpectedly reduced to four days due to a complete power outage at the Antalya Free Zone where Naval Yachts and about 30 other shipyards are located.  We are now entering the wet winter season here in Antalya and while we have been having some spectacularly beautiful blue skies and sunny days, the rain has also been arriving along with LOTS of thunder and lightning last weekend.  I assume this is what took out the power in the Free Zone and gave us all an unexpected “snow day” off as we used to call it when I was a kid growing up in various parts of Canada where we would often get so much snow overnight that the roads were all impassable and so all the schools would close.  Oh drat said all the parents, Oh Yayyyyyyy, said all us kids!  While I’m still very young at ❤ I was now saying “Oh Drat!” at not being able to work on Möbius at Naval but I just turned my bike around and pedalled back home to work from there so it wasn’t a totally lost day.

Several members of Team Möbius were not working on Möbius this past week but for those of us who were we did get lots done so I have plenty for this week’s Show & Tell for you and I also have some photos to share that I didn’t have time to include in the past few blog updates.  So grab a comfy chair and tasty beverage and let’s go see what happened onboard the Good Ship Möbius for the four days of December 15-18, 2020.

You will figure out this week’s Update title as you go through this posting where many of the jobs being worked on started wtih the letter “T” such as the dinette Table, the Tender, Teak shower floors and TreadMaster.  A bit like when Sesame Street would be “Brought to you by the letter T” perhaps? and you will soon see what the “Ado” is all about so let’s get going ……………………….

First though, we interrupt our regular programming for a word from our sponsor, well MY “sponsor” so to speak. 

PXL_20201220_102645870** Wayne’s “mushiness” Warning!!!  This next bit is NOT technical  boatbuilding stuff so if that’s what you are anxious to get to, scroll down to the next section please. 

For the braver souls and fellow romantics, read on……………

Happy 7th Anniversary of our First Kiss Captain Christine!

*  If you have not already done so you may want to read my previous post here on 22 November for some context.  It was titled “The simple comment that Changed My Life Forever Better”  which it tells the story about how Christine and I first connected thanks to this little character; “Barney the Yorkshire Terror” .
Barney-from-first-contact-my-talking-pet-video If you read that story you will already know that I’m a hopeful romantic (who would call romance helpless?!?!?!!?!?)  

Given our rather unconventional first connection and all the equally unique adventures that followed, we have a LOT of different “anniversaries” and we LOVE celebrating every one of them, every year.
2013-12-19 001

My favorite anniversary though is the one we celebrate today, December 19th of our very fist kiss on the very first day we met in person when Christine flew all the way from her sailboat in Florida to where I was on my sailboat in Fiji and I snapped this very fist photo of her as she walked into the Arrival gate at Nadi International Airport on 19th December, 2013.

PXL_20201220_102645870Christine says that for her it was “Love at first Skype”, which happened about a month earlier and I won’t refute.  However for me it was THAT FIRST KISS when we finally first met in person on 19 December, 2013 and I knew for sure that I had just kissed (and been kissed back I might add!!!)  by the woman who would become my best friend, my lover, my wife, my Captain and my partner in life, for life.

Happy 7th First Kiss Anniversary my Love!  Can’t wait to get started on our next set of adventures for the next 7 years together!  First though, lets start by enjoying this First Kiss anniversary day with these flowers in our cozy little apartment in Antalya.

OK, OK!  Now back to our regular programming ………………..


“T” is for Table

PXL_20201210_092310547.MPFor those who were not with us last week, we saw Ramazan get started building this ro$ewood Table.
PXL_20201207_091912418Which, when finished, will be mounted atop this very cool air assist height adjustable pedestal with that X-Y slider you can see in the background.

All this aluminium beauty comes from the Zwaardvis Pedestals company in the Netherlands and it is all “boat jewelry” in my eyes.
Zwaardvis Triton Deluxe pedestalThis Z-axis or vertical height adjustable pedestal has 2 stages for maximum height adjustment which is assisted by an internal gas lift cylinder similar to what you might have on the rear hatch of a SUV.  You order these by the weight of your table top so the assist is just right and changing the height an easy single handed operation by simply releasing one or both locking handles, moving the table up/down to the height you want and closing the levers.
Triton X-move slider The XY slider, allows us to move the table  200mm / 8” fore/aft and side to side to also get the XY position of the table just right. 

Up high and close in for eating or working and then down and out for more of a coffee table setup and then all the way down to put the table top and surrounding seats all the same height to create a very large bed for those rare occasions we have more overnight guests than our lovely Guest cabin with a Queen + Pullman bed can accommodate.

PXL_20201211_080236219This is where Ramazan started on Tuesday with the solid 50mm / 2” solid Rosewood edging all glued with biscuit joints around the circumference.  Then he has put a large 40mm / 1.6” radius around all the edges and given it a good sanding.
PXL_20201215_085302438Now the table moves up to the 2nd floor Finishing Room where Neşet here is inspecting all the surfaces with a very fine eye in order to ……
PXL_20201215_085318864……. find any remaining small spots that need filing in order to make them glass smooth after this first coat of clear Polyurethane “varnish”.
PXL_20201216_100829791Then it is “rinse & repeat” four more times to build up the five coats of PU that goes onto each piece of Rosewood cabinetry.

This is how it looks after the 2nd coat has been applied and is ready for wet sanding before the 3rd coat is sprayed on.

“T” is also for Teak Shower Floors

PXL_20201215_091731080.MPWe didn’t want any Teak on the exterior of Möbius, nor any SS, paint, etc. but we welcomed the use of Teak to make the removable floor inserts in both Showers.

Orkan is the Teak Decking specialist and Naval so he was the perfect guy to apply those deck making skills to these interior floors as you can see he has done masterfully here.
PXL_20201215_091749874

In keeping Low Maintenance as a top priority, we didn’t want to have a Teak grate style flooring so we came up with this self draining system where all the water simply runs off the four sides through these recesses and then runs over to the drain in the center of the fiberglass shower floor below.

These floor plates have a series of fiberglass “feet” on the bottom to keep the air/water space between the teak and the fiberglass and they can be easily lifted out to clean underneath from time to time.


Whale Grey IC waste pump systemThe shower drains use the relatively new Whale Gulper IC Intelligent Control automatic Gray water pumping system. (click for full resolution of this or any photo)

We use diaphragm pumps almost exclusively for all our water, bilge, crash pumps on Möbius as our experience has taught us that these are FAR superior to centrifugal style pumps in that they have that proverbial “suck a golf ball through a garden hose”  type of suction power and require NO filters or screens so they almost never clog.


Whale Grey IC smart manifoldThe IC or Intelligent Control that Whale has added to these pumps makes them work all the better by having a simple solid state water sensing probe embedded in the Yellow manifold you see here which automatically turns the pump On/Off as needed and allows you to connect 2 different sources of Grey Water which we use to drain both the Master Bathroom/Head and Shower floors.

Simple and efficient, what’s not to like?!!
PXL_20201215_084340067At the other end of the size scale of our diaphragm pumps is this brute underneath the Stbd/Right workbench in the Workshop.
PXL_20201215_084257360It does double duty being both our high volume/high water bilge pump and our Fire “hydrant” system that pumps sea water from the Sea Chest to a fire hose and nozzle stored in he Aft Hazmat locker.
PXL_20201215_084305422Several of you were curious about this pump so HERE is a link to the basic specs on our Feit PVM 1R diaphragm Pump.

*  24V 0.75 HP motor

*  120 Litres/min / 32 USG/min

@ 7 meters / 23 ft Delivery and 4m / 13 ft Suction

“T” is also for TreadMaster:

PXL_20201207_063914665Another job continuing on from last week’s Progress Update is the laying of the last of the TreadMaster on all the aluminium decks and stairs.  You can read all the details of the method in the previous posts and here is the TreadMaster Team; Faruk (Left) spreading the epoxy adhesive, Ali bringing the cut-to-size piece of TreadMaster to lay down on this epoxy, and Orhan following behind getting ready to cut the next piece.
PXL_20201207_064016342Ali in position with the piece of TreadMaster that Orhan has pre-cut as Faruk evens out the peanut butter consistency West Systems epoxy with his V-notched spreader.
PXL_20201209_080859251More “Rinse & Repeat”  and they soon have the Aft Deck fully covered with TreadMaster.  After drying overnight Ali covers all the fresh new Treadmaster wtih protective cardboard as these will continue to be high traffic areas during the rest of the build.
PXL_20201210_064932240Taking a quick tour around the boat to show some of the other areas getting the full TreadMaster treatment.

Treads on each of the Spiral stairs up from the Aft Deck to the SkyBridge ready for their TM.
PXL_20201207_064135108.MPet Voila!  Super safe, easy on the feet stairs up to the SkyBridge.
PXL_20201207_064242744And same going back down.
PXL_20201207_064147489.MPRough cut TM set in place down the Starboard/Right side of the SkyBridge with the 20mm / 3/4” spacers fast glued in place to keep the spacing just right while they are being epoxied down.
PXL_20201207_121819489With all the SkyBridge deck sheets of TM cut to finished size with their radiused corners, Faruk and Ali get busy gluing them all down.
PXL_20201207_064216072SkyBridge Helm Chair just set here for now.  Once the TM all dries it will be moved aft to the Helm Station and through bolted in place there. 

Hmmmm, with a view like this maybe a good spot for a 3rd or 4th Llebroc chair??
PXL_20201210_064241234Swim Platform done.
PXL_20201210_111528870.MPStairs on both sides going up from the Swim Platform to the Aft Deck all TM’d now.
PXL_20201207_064408498Side Decks ready to have their TM glued down.
PXL_20201208_074730490Front Deck all done and dusted!

Protective cardboard all taped down.
PXL_20201208_074632676Anchor Chain Stopper all mounted so this Anchor Deck can now have all its TM glued down.
PXL_20201215_084646829And the Forepeak Hatch has its Bofor Dog Latches all mounted and has received its full TreadMaster treatment.

Much “Ado” about Flooring!

PXL_20201218_094713345This will just be a preview to wet our appetite for next week’s Möbius Progress Update and will complete the rest of this week’s title riddle for you.
PXL_20201218_094730466This is a stack of the Ado LVT or Luxury Vinyl Tile “click-in-place” floor planks that we are using in all the interior floors on Möbius.

Ado is a HUGE Turkish building materials company and one of their specialties is Luxury Vinyl Tile or LVT flooring systems typically used in very high traffic situations such as airport terminals, commercial buildings and residential homes.
Ado LVT tech spec  LVT is completely waterproof, Fireproof, made for use overtop of in-floor heated floors, quiet and eXtremely tough with life spans over 20 years even in very high traffic applications such as airport terminals so it seemed like the Goldilocks Just Right choice for Möbius.
PXL_20201218_094750753This link will show you the white highly textured “Aperta 2010” we have chosen to use from their “Viva Series”.   As per this label on the boxes, this is the “Click” type with a 0.7mm thick “wear Layer” as per the Tech Spec illustration above.
PXL_20201218_094927657Tough to focus on but this is my attempt to show you how the interlocking “Click” system works.  I suspect many of you will have installed flooring with a similar system in your homes and boats as this has been popular for over 20 years in the building trades and is a very DIY system.
PXL_20201218_094843849Difficult to show how well textured this flooring is, but think well seasoned and aged wood decks on boats and homes and you’ll have it just right.  We have tested samples with bare wet feet and it has proven it will be eXtremely non-slip throughout the boat.

Stay tuned for more as the Ado flooring installation begins next week.

”T” is also for Tender:

PXL_20201209_083134780.MPNihat (seen here) and Uğur only worked on Möbius two days this week but I have all of their work from last week to catch up with you on so still plenty to show you as they finished off their “hot works” stage of welding up the aluminium jet drive tender hull.
PXL_20201209_083146026.MPNihat has now had an eXtreme amount of practice at grinding down the welds on all the hull plates on Möbius herself so he was VERY fast at getting all the Tender’s welds flush and all the corners nicely radiused.
PXL_20201210_113734404meanwhile, inside the Tender, Uğur was busy cutting in this access to the area underneath the bench seat in the Steering Console.
PXL_20201210_153049653Like Nihat, Uğur is also very fast and he had this hinged seat lid all done in one afternoon from start to finish.

We will either just make up some rectangular seat cushions for the seat and back or perhaps buy some “bucket” style fish boat seats to go in here.
PXL_20201210_113752611.MPUğur was even faster at welding in these two Lift Bridle attachment points up at the Bow.
PXL_20201210_113802352And mere minutes later, these two matching ones at the Aft end corners down at floor level.
PXL_20201215_065420333.MPNext up was fabricating and attaching these two boarding safety handrails that go on either side of the flat Bow.  Uğur is a master at these nicely radiused bends at any angle which work out better than using a hydraulic pipe bender for small numbers of bends.

A series of evenly spaced cuts with an angle grinder make it easy to form these different radius bends.
PXL_20201215_084845756And then each cut is welded back solid.
PXL_20201215_122951659.MPAll the welds are ground down and sanded and you’re done!

40mm / 1.6” OD thick walled AL pipe
PXL_20201215_123320801.MPThese safety boarding hand rails needed to be removable so we played with a few positions and picked this one.
PXL_20201215_123325308We used the very simple bolted flange system that we have used throughout the building of Möbius.
PXL_20201215_144724345The thicker (10mmm / 3/8”) bottom flange is threaded and welded to the hull itself to create a base for the thinner top flange welded to the handrails to bolt to with NO penetration of the hull itself.
PXL_20201215_144714086All four bases get tacked in place with the Handrails bolted to them so we can test for just right position before fully welding the threaded bottom flanges to the hull.
PXL_20201217_105006972.MPSuper Polisher Nihat then comes in and cleans up the welds and the hull areas around them and it is all done!

I will probably pick up on the work to complete the Tender by installing the Castoldi 244 Jet Drive and the 4 cylinder Yanmar HTE 110HP engine, but that will all need to wait till after we launch Möbius so this may be the last you see of the Tender here for the next few months but do stay tuned for that and the test drive!
And that’s going to be a wrap folks for the 4 day week that was December 14-18, 2020 here at Naval Yachts and onboard the Good Ship Möbius.

Thank you SO much for taking time out of your busy day to join me here and hope you will do so again next week.  Love to get your thoughts, questions and suggestions on any of the above so please type them into the “Join the Discussion” box right down below.

-Wayne