One Year & 7300nm later; Most & Least Favorite Möbius Features  April 17-30 2023

One Year & 7300nm later; Most & Least Favorite Möbius Features April 17-30 2023

Not as much to post about the past two weeks as I have been out of commission after hurting my back badly when I tripped and fell last week and aggravated the four cracked discs I have had from a nasty motorcycle accident over 25 years ago.  But the spasms are lessening each day since and just a matter of time before I’m back to just the usual back ache which is my normal state. 
bahamas_map routesNo complaints from me though as we continue to enjoy taking our time to weave our way generally north through some of the hundreds of postcard like Bahamian islands.


PXL_20230421_175816562When I left off in the last post we were in Red Cut Cay and after a few days there we continued up and anchored at Black Point then on to Allen’s Cay and then a very neat fully enclosed very tiny little bay on Royal Island as seen here on our chart plotter.
PXL_20230421_174626444This will give you a better perspective on how small the entrance was and if you click on the photo I have circled in RED the two short pieces of white PVC pipe that marked each side.
PXL_20230421_174718305Captain Christine guided us through as she put the entrance in our wake and ……
PXL_20230421_175223227…… I soon had the anchor down into the sandy bottom 2.5m/8ft below and we were soon enjoying our very own little anchorage with wine up in the SkyBridge.  THIS is why we worked on the design so hard with Dennis to have the least draft possible; 1.3m/4.4 ft
route to Coopers TownAfter Royal Island we made our way over to Lynyard Cay where we anchored for four days and had a chance to meet up with some sailing friends Mark & Shawnae who were anchored nearby on their latest boat s/v Big Sky Blue Waters (they hail from Montana).  Difficult to show on maps as most of these spots are too small to show up but you can get a rough idea of our route and anchorages along the way.  We are now anchored up near the north end of Great Abaco Island just off of Coopers Town. 
There is a storm front coming through this weekend with winds out of the West and South rather than the usual Easterlies so we’ll wait out here for that to pass and then make our way West as we get ready to jump off and cross over to West Palm Beach area in Florida in the next week or so. 

That catches you up on our most recent travels and anchorages and now I thought that something a bit different might be of interest to many of you.  Read on to see what you think and let me know your thoughts with comments in the “join the discussion” box at the end please.

Year in Review: Top Features We Like Most and Least on Möbius

Hard to believe but we started writing this Mobius.World blog back in March 2018 so we’ve just passed the five year mark for that and the primary motivation for creating and writing the 262 posts since then has been the hope that sharing our experiences here provides a good way for us to “pay it forward” for all the other people who went before us and shared their experiences from which we learned SO much.   In keeping with that hope, as the calendar turns over to May (how did THAT happen so fast??) we have been actively cruising Möbius for one year now.  Also on the hard to believe list is that our log book shows that we have just ticked over 7300 nautical miles (8400 miles/13,520 Kilometers) and most of that in just the last six months since leaving Turkey at the end of October.  Last year we were in and out of a number of marinas so we have been through our share of Med mooring, docking, fueling up and the like.  This year we’ve been on anchor every night for the past four months in quite a variety of conditions, bottoms and weather.  We’ve done everything from short day trips, lots of overnight passages and some longer ones such as our trans Atlantic crossing of 14 days.  With these cumulative experiences I thought now would be a good time to reflect on what we have learned over the past year about what is working out best for us as well as what has not worked so well and we would change or do differently to make Möbius even better.  I will write this up as two blog posts grouping what’s worked best into one and then a second with what changes we would make to follow.  In my experience I have found that first hand experience from others has proven to be the best and most useful for making my decisions and so I hope these twin posts will do likewise for some of you.

A few caveats before I go any further:

  • All of the points I’ll be covering are simply what has worked so well or not for us and our use cases with no suggestion that these would be best for other owners, boats and use cases.
  • There is no implied order or ranking of these items, simply a list.
  • Any mention of specific products is done for clarity only, these are not endorsements and we have no sponsors or affiliations with any of the products mentioned.
  • In the years of posts here on this blog, I have provided lots of detailed coverage, too much perhaps, of each of these items during the build so in this posting I will just be listing the reasons why each item is on the list.  If you are interested in more details you can refer to these previous posts and I’ll provide links to some of these.

OK, with that out of the way, let’s jump right into our top favorite features on Möbius.

Anchor system

IMG_2709Starting up at the Bow, our whole anchoring system has proven to be eXtremely strong, reliable and easy to use and has perhaps contributes more than any other system to our SWAN factor that enable us to Sleep Well At Night in every anchorage in all conditions.  The “SideWinder” mounting of the anchor off the Port side of the Bow which Dennis and I designed, has proven to be a great setup eliminating the anchor and roller assembly from sticking out over 1m at docks and keeps it very securely pressed against the hull in pounding seas with nary a sound or any movement.
PXL_20201014_082740608.MPThe primary components of our Anchoring System are

110Kg/242lb Rocna anchor

100m/330ft of Galvanized DS40 13mm chain
PXL_20230426_203728345

Maxwell windlass VWC4000 w/Maxwell controls at both helms and wired remote in forepeak

Lewmar Deluxe Heavy Duty Chain Stopper 13mm chain

Lewmar EVO 55 Self-Tailing Winch for kedging
PXL_20230426_203658604The chain all stows inside of a round aluminium chain bin inside the forepeak which has worked out eXtremely well as there is no “castling” of the chain as it is stowed.
PXL_20210210_113928698and any anchor mud and muck that gets in there is easily flushed out through the drain in the bottom that exits out the side of the hull just above the waterline.


PXL_20230427_142622061Once the anchor is set we attach a 25mm/1″ nylon snubber line using a loop of Dyneema with a slip knot that goes through one link on the chain.  This takes seconds to attach or remove and the snubber from the chain and absorbs of any shock loads on the anchor chain and eliminates any chain noise into the boat. 
PXL_20230426_203523246Letting the chain out until the snubber is taking all the tension the line comes up through the large round “nose cone” in the very front of the Bow and ties to the Samson post.  Leading the snubber line through the center of the Bow reduces side to side swinging at anchor and the hyperbolic curve machined on the inside of the sold AL snubber cone prevents chaffing of the line which still shows no sign of chaffing after over 150 nights at anchor so far.  The large degree of forward slope of the anchor deck also worked out great making it easy to hose down with all the debris draining out the nose cone back into the sea.
All together this is a super dependable and easy to deploy/retrieve anchor system that sets first time every time and resets immediately on severe wind shifts.  Depends on water depth of course but typically we have about 30m/100ft of 13mm anchor chain out which adds an additional 120kg/265lbs to the 110kg/242lbs of anchor on the bottom so we SWAN very well every night and is definitely one of our favorite systems!

Foul Release silicone bottom paint

PXL_20210521_132919072Our last minute decision to go with silicone based “Foul Release” bottom paint instead of CopperCoat has turned out to be one of THE best decisions we made.  This Foul Release type of bottom paint never ceases to amaze me with how it prevents almost anything from growing on it and what might be there after months of sitting still comes off completely with a simple wipe with a sponge or cloth to bring it back to like new.  We used the International version called InterSleek 1100SR but several other manufacturers such as Hempel “Silic One” are also available.
PXL_20210521_133015028This paint has been in the water for over two years now and it still cleans up completely with just a sponge or cloth if we’ve been sitting at anchor for a long time and currently shows no sign of wear or age.  It is supposed to be good for 5-7+ years and so far looks like it will achieve that easily which would be a HUGE benefit in terms of efficient hull speeds and no costly annual haul outs.  I can’t say for sure but I think that having such clean and slippery silicone hull surface contributes to our overall hull efficiency, speed and great fuel burn rates.  What’s not to like??!!

Open and Accessible system installation

IMG_20200527_095915All of the system components, wiring and plumbing were given dedicated locations with completely open access.  This reduced the time for initial installation during the build but more importantly continues to put a smile on my face every time I need to do any work or maintenance on any of the systems as everything is easy to access and mounted at a just right height for working on.
PXL_20230426_213319964Here in the Basement for example you can see how all the components such as all the 14 MPPT controllers on the Left and the three 240V Victron Multiplus inverter/chargers on the Right, are all mounted such that when I’m kneeling or sitting in front of them they are at the just right height right in front of you to see and work on.
PXL_20230426_213832093Same story back in the Workshop area where all the major components on the Right such as the DC Distribution box, Kabola diesel boiler, watermaker and AirCon chiller system are mounted on top of the shelves to put them at just right height as well.
PXL_20230426_214004899At the far end, the front of the Day Tank has been used to mount all the fuel filters, Alfa Laval centrifuge and fuel transfer valve manifolds are out in the open and at perfect height when standing in front of them.
PXL_20230426_213903037Underneath that shelf the electrical wiring, external rectifiers and water distribution manifolds are also open and easy to access. 


PXL_20211212_100924297All of the plumbing is similarly open and easy to access such as this manifold with valves for all the cold water consumers in the Master Cabin.

One of our four primary principles for the design and build of Möbius was Low Maintenance and having all the components, wiring and plumbing open and so easily and comfortably accessed has been a big factor in achieving this goal throughout the whole boat.

Propulsion Perfection:

PGL sketch 54 Nogva-HelsethAs we did for all the major components, we took a “systems” approach to the propulsion system from front of the engine to the prop.  coupled to a Nogva Controllable Pitch Propeller (CPP) is also way up at the top of our list of favorite features on Möbius. 


PXL_20210401_133343724Our choice of a Gardner 6LXB engine aka Mr. Gee,
IMG_20191118_102450coupled to a Nogva Controllable Pitch Propeller (CPP) via a Nogva HC-168 2.95:1 reduction gearbox is also way up at the top of our list of favorite features on Möbius. 

The combination of the slow revving engine and lack of any transmission shifting created a seamless and smooth propulsion system.  This was our first experience with CPP and it did take some time to learn how to run a boat where you first set the throttle at the RPM you want and then don’t touch it and just use the Pitch lever to increase pitch through an infinite range from zero/neutral to maximum pitch for the load and speed you want.  With no shifting involved to go from forward to reverse it is eerily quiet and smooth when docking and when underway we essentially run the boat based on the EGT or Exhaust Gas Temperature meter to get the just right pitch for any speed we want.


We cruise between 8.5-9 knots and after 7300 nautical miles our overall propulsion efficiency has us averaging about 1.85 L/NM @ 8.5kts which we are eXtremely pleased with.

PXL_20230426_213808786The dedicated “propulsion room” is another of my most favorite design decisions as it similarly provides open and easy access to Mr. Gee and all his components,
PXL_20210129_124430339….. as well as the Nogva gearbox, coupling and Tides Marine dripless prop shaft seal.  I am able to stand, sit or kneel on the grated composite flooring on all sides and with a full meter of width all around and each grate can be easily lifted out of the way to provide access underneath if needed. Having a dedicated engine room with nothing but the engine inside keeps everything inside easy to see and work on, easy to keep well ventilated and all the other components typically found in engine rooms such as fuel filters, batteries and system components are kept OUT of this environments heat and vibration.  More examples of how well the open and accessible systems design is one of our favorite features.

Layout (cabin locations, balance living vs functional, up/down)

Interior GA plan snipThe overall interior layout also makes it way to the top of our favorite aspects of live aboard Möbius.  For us it has the Goldilocks balance between amount of living space vs functional systems space and our decision to have a very large forepeak up front and then an even larger engine room/workshop space in the rear has resulted in a great layout as well as keeping these spaces completely separate with their own dedicated access so you never need to go through a living space area to get to something in the forepeak or engine room or workshop.
012 Interior GA inboard profile Rev C snipThe vertical layout has also worked out eXtremely well for us with each cabin a few steps below the SuperSalon and the SkyBridge up above.  One of the most useful features of our layout is having an enormous “Basement” area below the floor of the SuperSalon.  We designed this to be 1.2m/ 4ft high such that you can easily move around by bending over and not hit your head on anything and then sit or kneel to access any of the equipment mounted on intermediate floor to ceiling walls or access any of the many storage bins and shelves in the Basement.
IMG_0620The stairs leading down into the SuperSalon from the Aft Deck on the Left and then around to the stairs down into the Ships Office and Guest cabin on the Right provide excellent access between all these areas.
IMG_1506Very difficult to photograph but hopefully this pano shot of the SuperSalon will help convey why we like this layout with the 360 degrees of glass so much.

SkyBridge

PXL_20210926_072850258We knew we wanted a Flybridge overtop of the main Salon or House so this was part of the design from the beginning but I don’t think either of us appreciated just how much we would enjoy this feature and how much time we would spend up here both when at anchor and underway.
IMG_1568Part of what makes this space work so well is our decision to put the Upper Helm at the Aft end of the SkyBridge.  As we’ve done in several areas of the boat we have created an initial prototype for the seating in this SkyBridge Lounge area by using patio furniture which we rearrange from time to time to figure out what will work best longer term.  So far this L shaped layout has worked out best.
IMG_1570There are great sight lines when sitting in the Helm chair just outside this photo on the far Left and yet still takes full advantage of the height for sight lines through the 360 degrees of windows that surround this entire space. 
IMG_2511The Bow and the side rub rails are all fully visible from the Helm chair.
IMG_2510 The roof overtop of the outdoor galley down on the Aft Deck does prevent a direct view of the transom but otherwise the sight lines Aft are great and we have a camera that displays a birds eye view of the transom on the Helm displays if needed when backing into a dock.

IMG_1514The Helm down in the SuperSalon duplicates the Upper SkyBridge Helm.
IMG_1580But unless the weather is very cold or wet we much prefer to run the boat from the SkyBridge with its added height and even better visibility.

IMG_1574At anchor it also makes a great office space and a comfy bed for naps and off watch time as well.  So the SkyBridge definitely makes it onto our top favorites list.

Hot Water & Heated Floors

PXL_20220110_133823995Another example of the advantages of taking a Systems approach is our Domestic Hot Water system or DHW and probably fair to say that the heart of our DHW system that puts his solidly on our top favorites is our decision to install a Kabola diesel fired boiler.  Located with all the other system components in the Workshop it is out of the way yet easily accessible. 
IsoTemp Basic cut awayThe 75L Kabola boiler is our primary source of DHW as it circulates through one of three heat exchanger circuits in our Calorifier that stores all our hot water as can be seen in this cutaway demo.  The second heat exchanger circuit routes hot water from our Gardner engine and so whenever we are running the boat this provides all our hot water instead of the Kabola boiler.  The third heat source is a 240V electrical heating element which we can use if the water based heat exchangers should ever fail.

IMG_20200723_175120However the one feature of our DHW that truly steals the show in cold weather is mostly invisible and that our Heated Floors.  Underneath the vinyl flooring in all the living spaces there are circuits of plastic PEX tubing that circulates hot water and provides a creature comfort in colder climates that is difficult to adequately describe in words.  A detailed description of the whole heated floor system can be found HERE in this previous blog post


Open Direct HEATING Mode illustrationAs you can read in that more detailed blog post, this is quite a simple system really but does take a bit to get your head around how it works as this is all part of the overall domestic hot water system so that all the water flowing through the floor PEX is coming from the Calorifier in the Basement circulating the same water as distributed to all the sinks and showers on the boat.  No valves to adjust or turn on/off it all works by virtue of how this “Open Direct” plumbing design dictates.


IMG_20200724_153643Overtop of the PEX tubing and rigid foam, these industrial vinyl floor planks provide a fantastic floor in all weather conditions and are specifically made to work well with heated floors.  Critical for our use on a boat, these vinyl floor planks have a simulated wood grain texture molded in which has proven to be completely skid proof even with wet feet and any spills clean up easily.  After two years of rigorous use these floors show zero signs of wear or marks which helps keep them on our top favorites list.


PXL_20220110_133737110There are three independent zones for the two cabins and the SuperSalon and each is controlled by one of these easy to set thermostats which maintain whatever temperature you want.


In Floor heating manifolds   pumps installedThe manifolds and pumps are mounted down in the Basement up against the Aft bulkhead and yet another example of how easy this whole system is to access. 


Battery & Solar Based Electrical System

XPM Electrical System v5Yet another systems approach on our top favorites list is our overall Electrical system.  It is “battery based” in that all four voltages; 12V + 24V DC and 120V + 240V AC comes from our 1800Ah @ 24V House Battery bank.  AC is created via the 5 Victron MultiPlus inverter/chargers and the DC is provided via three DC distribution boxes; Central Main in the Basement plus one in the Forepeak and one in the Workshop for the high amperage circuits there.
PXL_20230305_194435025Solar is our primary source for recharging the house batteries most of the time but when we are underway the two massive 250A x 24V Electrodyne alternators with WakeSpeed 500 regulators provide up to 9KW of power and we also have the option of connecting to shore power whenever we are in a marina. 
PXL_20220614_084653028There are eight 320W solar panels that form the roof of our SkyBridge as seen in the photo above and then three more mounted on top of the cantilevered roof over the Outside Galley on the Aft Deck as seen here.
PXL_20230421_174621920And then three more mounted in a hinged frame in front of the SkyBridge.  These 14 solar panels add up to just over 4kW of potential power and most days our battery monitors show an actual input of between 1kW during the winter months and up to over 2.5kWh of power during summer hours.
14 MPPT croppedEach solar panel has its own MPPT controller which are mounted in the Basement and feed into individual circuit breakers for further control as seen here.  Having a dedicated MPPT for each panel reduces the impact of any shading on any panel and helps with the overall performance of our solar system.
2023 Solar screen shotThis screen shot from our Victron VRM display shows a summary for our solar output vs electrical consumption so far in 2023.
Solar screen shot 2daysAnd this summary of the past 2 days, April 28+29 2023 lets you see how it varies throughout a 24 hour day.
We have not been in a marina or connected to shore power in the past four months and the combination of solar and alternator power is keeping our batteries 100% charged every day and so easily makes it onto our favorites list!

Handholds Everywhere for Everyone

Safety was another of the four design principles we had and one example that has proven to be a big favorite is the way we were able to ensure that there were super solid hand holds for EVERY person onboard from children to adults.

PXL_20230429_221424227On the exterior the handholds are all 30mm diameter thick walled AL pipe such as these on the aft end of the house roof near the Aft Deck.  These pipe handholds also make for eXcellent strong points for fastening things with Dyneme and other lines.
PXL_20220410_045308681Perhaps one of the most important spots for handholds is along the side decks when you are moving between the Fore and Aft Deck areas.  On the left you can see the continuous length of AL pipe that runs along the entire edge of the house roof and then the three rows of Dyneema landlines that Christine rigged between each of the sturdy vertical AL stanchion pipes.  The top lifeline is 1 meter above the deck so hits most adults about waist height which ensures that even if you were to be thrown against these you would be stopped and not flipped over top.
PXL_20220409_122230625.MPUp at the Bow there is a very solid set of AL pipe railings that wrap all the way around and make this area extremely safe and fun spot to be for dolphin watching or just dangling your feet overboard and taking in the scenery at anchor or underway.
PXL_20230429_221545056At the far end of the Aft Deck there are solid AL pipe railings for the corner of the deck before the stairs going down to the Swim Step and then a solid AL pipe railing on the other side of the steps.
PXL_20210401_133333873In the Engine Room, Mr. Gee has a full set of AL pipe railings wrapped around him to ensure you can’t be tipped over onto him in rough seas and these have worked out very well to also provide good support as you are leaned over working on various parts.
PXL_20230429_221349601On the interior of the boat one of our favorite esthetic features of the gorgeous Rosewood cabinetry is the design we came up with to incorporate built in hand holds to the design that are located on all the cabinets in all the cabins and SuperSalon.  This example is on the corner of the Galley cabinet across from where the fridges are located.
PXL_20230429_221334439These solid Rosewood edges wrap around the whole boat to form what we call our “Blue Horizon Line” and their key feature is that they have a deep groove that is at about waist height where your fingers naturally slip in to provide an eXtremely secure hand hold.  We have had our grandchildren onboard several times now and these have worked out as designed to be at Goldilocks height and size for their fingers too.

Interior Materials:

Possibly saving the best for last, something that brings us joy every day is the choice of interior materials we made. 

IMG_0926The Rosewood we chose for all the cabinetry really steals the show and this shot of the Galley cabinets will give you some idea. 
IMG_0622We were very fortunate that Naval Yachts happened to have their very best cabinetmakers throughout the entire build and they were a joy to work together with to produce details such as how all the grain is bookmatched such that it literally flows from one piece to the next.
IMG_20190509_140446This was made possible because after months of searching we were able to purchase an entire flitch of Brazilian Rosewood that had been flat cut from the same log. 
IMG_20190510_111038As each slice comes off they stack these in order and therefore the grain of each slice follows the next.
IMG_20190509_140503The other key was finding a matching stack of solid Rosewood that would be used to build the frames and every edge of every panel.  NO veneer edging allowed!
IMG_20190515_125458Unlike more typical construction, all plywood edges had these T shaped pieces of solid Rosewood glued in place and then the veneer was applied AFTER so that it overlapped the solid wood edging.
IMG_20190515_125524What this does is ensure that there are no glue joints exposed and they become invisible as they gradually transition from veneer to solid.  When these panels would be used for a corner of a cabinet, a thick piece of solid Rosewood was glued glued on and then this solid edge was rounded over in a shaper to create a large radius corner
IMG_20190516_152458The Rosewood was more than 11X the cost of any other hardwood so to help stretch the prized solid pieces it was sometimes possible to glue on a piece of cheaper hardwood like this and then round the Rosewood for the corner.
IMG_20190517_172430For the very large radius corners, strips of solid Rosewood were edge glued up and then radiused like this.
IMG_20190516_181601Or like this.
PXL_20230429_221349601When combined with the Turquoise Turkish marble and the inset Blue Horizon line strips, the end result was well worth the extra time and expense to build.
IMG_0601We carried the same combination of materials throughout both cabins, Salon and Galley and I hope these few photos help you see why this puts a smile on our faces every day.
DJI_0034There is a LOT more that we like about our dear Möbius and she has definitely lived up to being “Project Goldilocks” by being just right, just for us but the above items hit upon most of our top favorite features and I hope this review was worthwhile.  Of course there is always the other end of the spectrum and so in the next blog post I will follow up by reviewing things that have not worked out as well or are things we want to change so do stay tuned for that.


Friends & Fun in USVI, Puerto Rico + Bahamas Möbius Update 27 March – April 16, 2023

Friends & Fun in USVI, Puerto Rico + Bahamas Möbius Update 27 March – April 16, 2023

The past three weeks have flown by as we enjoyed having friends aboard and we continue meandering our way from USVI to Puerto Rico and now into the Bahamas. 

St Thomas   James routes with LiamPicking up where we left off in the last update, we were in St. Thomas USVI after a super fun week with our Grandson Liam and his Mom & Dad, Ashley & Tim as we sadly took them over to the airport to fly back to Florida. 
IMG_3147We then anchored Möbius over on the East end of St. Thomas so that we could pick up our very good friends Bob & Sue from Victoria BC when they flew in a few days later.
IMG_3134We spent the next few days moving Möbius along similar routes to the ones in the map above to show Sue & Bob around St. Thomas and St. John Islands.
PXL_20230331_140225371Bob & Sue were keen for some passage time aboard Möbius so they set up their return flights out of San Juan so they could join us on the relatively short trip from USVI over to Puerto Rico.
St. Thomas to Salinas PR route mapSo we moved over to Brewers Bay on the West end of St. Thomas for the last night in USVI before making the short jump over to the small island of Culebra that is part of Puerto Rico.  The RED route on the map here. (click to enlarge)
IMG_3155Christine & I had been to Culebra doing delivering a catamaran for some dear friends back in 2017 so it was fun for us to be back in this small island again as well. 
IMG_2697Next hop was over to Salinas on the South coast of the main island of Puerto Rico, GREEN on the map above, which was another spot that we had been to previously on that same delivery.
336803574_236703462231402_3109976857720055454_nTiming also worked out just perfect as some long time sailing friends of Christine were spending their last night on their sailboat in Salinas before sailing off to Antigua the next morning.  We joined Willie, Mark, Dick & Deb for a fabulous group lobster dinner in the small restaurant at the Salinas Marina to send them off in grand fashion. 


Mark kindly extended the lease on his rental car so we enjoyed that luxury to spend the day on the road with Sue & Bob seeing more of Puerto Rico including a stop for some delicious lunch at a roadside pig roast spot that was a favorite of Willie’s and then dropped Sue & Bob off at the San Jose airport.  Bon voyage nos Amis, thanks for the memories.
PXL_20230409_102543545

And !poof! just like that everyone was gone and it was back to just the two of us on Möbius as the Captain took us out of Salinas Bay for our next leg of the journey.
St. Thomas to Salinas PR route mapWe needed to check out of Puerto Rico so we moved over to the small anchorage in Puerto Real on the far West end of PR.  WHITE on the map.
IMG_2706We stayed in Puerto Real for the night and enjoyed a good dinner out at the local restaurant by the marina.  This was our first time in a marina this year, last time was in the Canary Islands in December before heading out on our Atlantic Crossing.  Solar panels are working eXtremely well and we have not needed shore power since we left Greece back in October nor most of the past year but being on the dock was convenient for doing the check out and a date night before heading off for the Bahamas.
USVI to Bahamas route mapMore and more countries are automating their marine check in/out process to be done online and this is working better and better but still has some odd bugs in the system and took us a few hours to complete but all went well in the end. 
PXL_20230409_102836332We anchored outside the marina for the day and left later in the afternoon to time our arrival in the Bahamas to be in daylight for good visual navigation.  This would be about 600 nautical miles (690 miles/1,110 km) passage and would take us a bit less than three days.
USVI to Bahamas route mapWe decided to head for Clarence Town to check into the Bahamas, a favorite of Christine’s from her many years sailing the Bahamas in her previous boats years ago.  You can click to enlarge this map but it is challenging to show the Bahamas on a map as it consists of more than 3,000 islands, cays, and islets and most of these only show up when you zoom way in.  But the RED line in this map will give you a rough idea of our route. 
It is estimated that the Bahamas’ territory encompasses 470,000 km2 (180,000 sq mi) of ocean space with a total population of 400 thousand people spread across this area.
IMG_2646As usual, Weather Wonder Woman Christine found us another great weather window with very calm wind and seas making for smooth sailing as we settled into passage making mode for the next three days.
PXL_20230409_141159259For those interested in the boat’s performance, I’ve highlighted some of the key stats on our Maretron N2KView screen here.  I’ve set up two different SOG Speed Over Ground SOG meters, the one in Green is showing 9.5kts SOG averaged over about 3 minute intervals to give a better reading vs the one in Yellow showing 10.6kts which is the instantaneous SOG at the moment.  When calculated for the entire 560nm passage our average SOG anchorage to anchorage was 8.5kts and our overall fuel burn average for the passage was 1.7 L/NM or 2.2 NM/USG. 
The RED circle is the EGT or Exhaust Gas Temperature showing 359 degrees C / 678 F which translates into about 80% load.  We keep the EGT between 330-360C most of the time as this seems to be the best combination of ideal load, fuel burn and speed.  We will continue to try out other settings and report on the results in future updates.


PXL_20230411_115428224As you can see, conditions were ideal for power boating for most of our three days at sea and we only put the paravanes out for one night to reduce the roll when we encountered some larger swells out of the NE.
IMG_2712The canine crew seemed to approve as well.
sat view Charlestown anchorageWe pulled into the well protected bay just off of Clarence Town on the North coast of Long Island and had the anchor down just after 10am Thursday, 13th of April.  As you can see depths in most bays and cays in the Bahamas is very shallow, averaging about 2.4m/8ft here and will help you understand why we worked so hard with Dennis to minimize our draught which is about 1.4m/4.6ft.
IMG_2719This is a relatively remote Port of Entry for the Bahamas and we had checked in online before arrival and then spoke with the agent by phone when we were anchored.  He is based over in Stella Maris on the other side of Long Island but he kindly offered to make the 90 minute drive and met us at the Government Wharf I’ve pointed to above and we completed the paperwork and got our passports stamped there and we were now officially in the Bahamas!
IMG_2724Christine went ashore the next day to stretch her legs and got a kick out of the slightly dark humour of the location of this Covid Test center from months previous.  Fortunately she reported no dead men sighted.
Long Island mapWe had a good night’s sleep and woke up to find over 10 other boats anchored around us, the nerve!  So we pulled up anchor and headed up to the very North end of Long island Green route here.
Santa Maria Bay anchorageChristine had picked out a lovely little bay just around the Northern tip of Long Island at Cape Santa Maria and she maneuvered us in and I dropped the anchor onto the sandy bottom in about 2.5m/8ft of water. 
PXL_20230415_213655153This is the view looking South as we enjoyed sundowners just the way we like it; the only boat in the bay.
Rudder Cut CayAfter enjoying the tranquility of our private anchorage, we continued to follow our previous wakes through many of the small Bahamian islands and cays and yesterday morning we made the jump North to another favorite anchorage at Rudder Cut Cay.  This photo will help you see how thin and small these cays are.
Wayne   piano mermaid Rudder Cut CayThis spot is quite famous amongst cruisers as it has a sunken statue of a mermaid playing a piano in the shallow waters here.  I went into our archives and dug up this photo from May 8, 2017 with me checking it out.  The mermaid said that she was working on her next composition and didn’t need any of my help so I let her be.
Cave at Rudder Cut CayThere are also several of these large caves carved into the shore just beside us here and are large enough to take your dinghy inside of and make for some fun snorkeling.

And that’s a wrap for this Mobius Update folks.  We continue to live and move on The No Plan Plan but in general we will continue to enjoy our time as we wander through the Bahamas and make our way North up to the East coast of the US.  It is looking most likely that we will spend the summer months up in the Chesapeake Bay area where we can stay put for several months so Christine can have the time and quiet to focus on writing her next novel.  I will continue to post updates along the way once or twice a month with some brief updates on places we get to and things we see.  Hope these travel logs are of some interest and please let me know what you’d like more of and less of as well as any questions you have as we go.

Thanks,

Wayne