Holy Flying Fish Batman! XPM78-01 Möbius Update 20-26 June, 2022

Another very busy week here in Finike as we work our way through the last boat jobs that need to be completed before we can set sail (yes, we still refer to it as “sailing”) and finally put Turkey in our wake.  In what feels a bit like some marine version of Groundhog Day (the movie), we thought we had left Finike for the last time about a month ago but life intervened with some new twists, quite literally.  Christine “twisted” her knee and needed to go back to Antalya to get that operated on and when we first launched the Tender the overhead beam portion of the Davit Arch “twisted” and needed to be replaced.  So we find ourselves back here in what was our home base for almost the past year to look after these and several other key items on our To Do lists.  All working out very well as we know and like this area and have a good network of people we can call on to help find things we need which really speeds up the process and allows us to get these jobs done much faster than if we were in a new town.

Weather here continues to be outstanding and much “cooler” than past summers.  Hottest we’ve been up to in the past few weeks is about 33-34C / 91-94F and nights have been down in the low 20’s / 70’s so makes for very pleasant evenings and sleeping and not too sweltering in the daytime though it does get toasty when you’re in the direct sun which I was for much of this past week and have the “farmers tan” to show for it.  But we go for a swim in the ocean on the other side of the rock seawall behind us and that is a great way to cool down and good exercise for Christine’s knee which continues to improve and get stronger and stronger.

A good variety of jobs on the go this week including building DIY Paravanes, assembling and installing he new Davit Arch v2.0 and getting all its rigging in place.  So let’s dive right in…………

Paravanes

Paravane rigging System v2Last week you may recall that I completed the rigging for the aluminium A-frames that fold out from each side of Möbius and have lines going down from their ends to a paravane of “fish” that glides about 6m/20’ below the water level.  The rendering here is from when I was doing the calculations for line lengths so you are seeing multiple positions of the paravanes whereas there is only one on each side in reality. 
Paravane working flow illustrationParavanes are know as a “passive” system to help stabilize the motion, side to side rolling in particular, of the boat in large seas and in rolly anchorages. 
The other option is to use active stabilizers such as fins or gyroscopes which work very well and at more of a flip of a switch, but they require a lot of power, a lot of $$ and are relatively complex systems known to be quite prone to failures or at least a lot of maintenance and so we’ve chosen to go with all mechanical and very simple paravanes which are commonly used by commercial fishing boats. 
Our intent is to use this paravane system for the next year or so and if we decide we want to change to active stabilizers in the future, the hull already has all the internal framing and watertight coffer dams which will make the installation of active stabilizers relatively quick and easy. 

Magnus Effect stabilizer illustrationFWIW, if we were to do go with active stabilization today we would probably chose to go with the Magnus Effect type of stabilizers as these can be folded inline with the hull when not in use.  This greatly reduces the danger of hitting something with the fins that permanently protrude out much further and can add some risk when in areas with lots of coral, rocks or ice.  And who knows what new systems might be developed by the time we might be looking into active stabilization?
Kolstrand paravanesThis is an example of the most commonly available paravanes from Kolstrand company and used by many commercial fishing vessels.  Galvanized steel and work very well but very heavy and a lot of drag.
Canadian plywood   lead paravane WoodFish from Balder VIII on Trawler ForumHowever, some fellow Canadian boaters have been having very good success with these DIY paravanes built using plywood for the horizontal wings and a metal T-bracket to attach to the line above and a lead weight on the front, so I’m going with this design. 
Relatively low cost and easy to build and these will let me do a lot of experimenting in the next year of use to try different sizes of wing surface area, front weight, attachment line positions, etc.  The ideal is to get the maximum roll resistance with the minimum drag.
Plywood paravanes being built by Cold Smoked on TFOver on the always helpful Trawler Forum, a trawler owner “Cold Smoked” had provided some photos of this type of paravane he was building and
plywood paravane being built by Cold Smoked…. ended up looking like this. 
Plywood Paravane by LarryM on TFThis is an example off this same style on the trawler mv Hobo all rigged up and ready to be tossed overboard.
LarryM fish in water with retreival lineHere is a shot when this paravane is at work and helps to show you how the A-frame on this boat works.
With the Paravane A-frames all rigged, this week I started building the paravanes or “fish” themselves. 
PXL_20220619_123240022To my surprise, finding good plywood suddenly seems to be very difficult but on our trip to Antalya last week we were finally able to find a lumber shop that had some pieces on the side they were willing to cut for me.
PXL_20220623_080435142.MPI worked out my best estimate of the various dimensions and scale for what I think will be close to the Goldilocks size of paravanes for Möbius and got to work cutting the plywood.
PXL_20220623_100209801My ever handy 18V Milwaukee router made it easy to put this bullnose profile on all the edges to help reduce the drag when these are flying through the water.
PXL_20220626_115201694Two coats of white epoxy to make the plywood waterproof and easy to see when deployed.  I’ll add a third and perhaps fourth coat tomorrow and can then start attaching the hardware.
PXL_20220626_115242034Ideally I would like to have used a round lead fishing weight cut in half but could not find any here in Turkey so I’m going to use these large disc zinc anodes that I found in a marine shop when we were in Marmaris a few weeks ago.  This one weighs about 7kg/15lbs and I will through bolt two of these to the bottom of the nose of the plywood. 

Paravane bracket sketchDidn’t seem worth it to fire up Fusion 360 for such a simple bracket and fin so I just made this quick and dirty hand sketch as I worked out the dimensions and proportions for the T-bracket and the Tail Vane.  I’m still tracking down someone in Antalya who has the AL plate I need and hope to have these here next week so I can finish building the fish for Möbius and start testing the whole paravane system out.  Stay tuned as that happens.
As I do with so many other systems, my intent is to use these first fish as prototypes and spend the first year or so experimenting with them to find that sweet spot of best roll resistance with least drag and all the tricks to deploying and retrieving them.  This design allows me to easily change the size and shape of the plywood wings as well as trying different amounts of front weights with the different zinc anodes I now have onboard.  And I can try different attachment points of the line to the fish to get the down angle just right and I try out different positions at different boat speeds in different sea conditions.  Should be fun and educational so stay tuned for more as I finish building and start using these paravanes in future blog posts.

Mr. Gee 3.0 First Oil Change

PXL_20220620_083618615.MPMr. Gee has now been thrumming away very happily for almost 50 hours now so this week I did his first oil change to make sure I could get rid of any particles that had gotten flushed out after the last rebuild.  He holds about 28 liters and I use a 24V transfer pump to make it very quick and easy to pull out all the old oil and then pump in all the new.  Mr. Gee has the optional hand pump for removing the oil so the oil pan is all plumbed for this and I just push on a vinyl hose and use the transfer pump instead.

Gardner recommends oil changes at about 400 hours so should not need to do this again until next year but I carry an extra 50 liters of 15W40 oil and several new oil and fuel filters so I can change these at any time.

Captain Christine’s Tech World

IMG_0987While I was busy with all the mechanical work this week, Christine continued her non stop game of Whack-a-Mole as she gets our complex set of electronic systems for navigation and monitoring all working and playing nice with each other.  Not something that lends itself to much in the way of photos but trust me she works harder than I do!  As just one example of hundreds, this is the screen she uses in Maretron N2K View to create the oil pressure gauge with all its settings, color coding, warning light, etc.  It is a super system for monitoring everything on board but you pay the price in both cost and time.

Davit Arch Beam v2.0

Davit Arch v2 beam Pocket rod detailWhen we first launched the Tender several weeks ago the overhead beam of the three piece Davit Arch failed and so we needed to have a new one designed and built. 
Fortunately Dennis, our awemazing Naval Architect at Artnautica in New Zealand, was kindly able to squeeze in my request to design this new version and have it fully tested by a structural engineer.  As we had done with the design of Möbius, we were able to collaborate on the design via Email to exchange models and test results.
Davit v3 loads from Dennis 26 May 2022Dennis was able to use some structural engineering plugins with Rhino3D that showed the various loads in all locations and guide us through the new design.  Then Dennis sent it to his engineer colleague Peter who did the full set of structural testing and gave it his OK.
Davit Beam v2All of this was then sent to Naval who also managed to squeeze building this new arch into their very busy schedule and had it build in less than a week.  Next challenge was how to get this beam out of the Free Zone and trucked the 120km to where Möbius is in Finike.
PXL_20220621_072505088.MPAs usual the solution involved hiring a customs broker, paying lots of fees and completing lots of forms but eventually the bonded truck showed up at Finike Marina on Monday.
PXL_20220621_073108033.MPPrecious cargo inside.
PXL_20220621_074046241And we soon had it out of the truck and onto the concrete behind Möbius. 
PXL_20220621_142359199.MPThe original two vertical legs of the Davit Arch were fine so it should have been a simple matter of bolting the three pieces together.  However nothing with boats is ever easy and the new beam was 40mm too short.  Grrrrrrr
PXL_20220623_111925916So I designed some adaptor plates to get the vertical legs in the right position and Naval kindly sent up a small crew with a welder and we were able to build and weld in the adaptor plates on Wednesday.
IMG_0992With the new beam now fully bolted in place the next challenge was to get the new Arch lifted aboard Möbius, aligned with the hefty brackets welded to the deck and the 50mm OD SS hinge pins pushed in place.  Fortunately crane trucks like this are ubiquitous in this area so Christine was able to quickly arrange for this one to show up.


IMG_0997Sure makes it easy to move heavy items from one spot to the next.
IMG_1001The fit is very close so it took some time to get everything lined up so the hinge pins would slide into place as you have to get the bored pin holes lined up within about 1mm or the pins won’t slide in.
PXL_20220626_144222934But with some help by our local marina handyman Faik, we finally got everything lined up and the SS pins pressed in place.
IMG_1003And version two of the Davit Arch was now in place and ready to be rigged.
PXL_20220626_083547840The rigging I had built for the first Arch had worked out fine but Dennis and I changed the Pivot Control Line blocks to be over on the far Port side (left in this photo) so that the angle the lines going to the beam were at the largest angle to reduce compression of the beam a bit.  The lines you can see on the right going up the vertical leg is a 6:1 set of triple blocks which lead to the hand winch on each vertical leg.  These lines lift the Tender Up/Down inside the arch to get the Tender up high enough to clear the deck chocks and the rub rail as it goes over the side.
PXL_20220626_083554027.MPThe Pivot Control Line goes through this 3:1 set of blocks and then ….
PXL_20220626_083625349……. over to the big Lewmar 65 electric winch in the centerline of the Aft Deck.
PXL_20220626_083631073.MPDavit Arch all rigged and ready for first test launch this coming week and I’ll bring you all of that and more in next week’s Möbius.World update.

And that’s a wrap for yet another week and almost another month!  Thanks SO much for taking the time to join us and follow along on our adventures.  Hope you will tune in again next week for the latest update and please continue to add your most appreciated comments and questions by typing them into the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Thanks!

Wayne

 

Just When We Thought We Were Out; …… Möbius Update 13-19, 2022a

Reminiscent of the line from one of the Godfather movies I believe “Just when I thought I was out; they pull me back in” Möbius is now back in Finike.  Multiple factors driving our decision including that Christine needed to go back to Antalya for one or more consultations with her surgeon who did the arthroscopic operation to fix her torn meniscus and we needed to get the new beam for the Davit Arch brought to Möbius from Naval Yachts in Antalya.  As you may recall, Setur Marina here in Finike was our “home port” since last July so we are very familiar with the area and know where to go to get things, who to talk with in our network here to get things done and a good safe spot to have Möbius tied up for a few more weeks while Christine continues her recovery and I get boat jobs done.

Marmaris to Finike

PXL_20220613_140841216.MPI spent most of the day on Monday going to different marine stores in Marmaris to pick up some of the lines and hardware I need for rigging up our Paravane stabilization system and doing some grocery shopping to stock up for the next week.  Christine had found a lovely little anchorage on the charts that was just about 10 nm (nautical miles) from the marina in Marmaris so we untied from the dock and headed over there on Monday afternoon leaving Marmaris in our wake as per the photo. 
Though I must point out “What wake?” as I am just so pleased with how clean Möbius slices through the water.  Thanks Dennis for the great hull design!
PXL_20220613_162930803.MPWe tucked inside a small bay with this small island just outside and enjoyed the sundown with some wine up in the SkyBridge with views like this.
PXL_20220614_010131475.NIGHTWe had a bit of a rude awakening when a ferry went past the entrance at about 3am which rolled us so bad we almost flew out of bed.  After picking up some of the items that had ended up on the floor we decided that we were wide awake and had a long run ahead of us so might as well just weigh anchor and head for Finike.  We were rewarded with what was apparently a special “Rose Moon” and very flat seas as you can see so made the decision pretty easy.
PXL_20220614_040449546It was ideal motor boat conditions with glassy flat seas and no wind.

This is a shot of our wake or lack thereof at about 8.3 knots
PXL_20220614_041557378And this is the bow wave.

It was about 110nm down to Finike and these conditions continued the entire way.  It was the longest continuous voyage we’ve yet taken aboard Möbius and gave us a good chance to test out running the boat for longer and longer runs as we get everything broken in and learn more and more about running this very unique and new to us boat.


I’ve discovered that our fuel flow meters have not been connected correctly so all my previous fuel burn numbers I’ve published are out by at least 40% so for this run I measured the actual volume of fuel removed from the Day Tank and used this to calculate the true fuel consumption.  109nm total distance traveled and we burned 169 liters so an average of 0.64 nm/L or 2.4 USG/nm which is right on my original estimates and MUCH better than the numbers I had been getting from the fuel flow meters.  Just like the oil pressure gauge problems that vexed me in the past, I have once again been tripped up by assuming that the gauges were correct.  Silly me!


PXL_20220614_084653028The Turquoise Coast of Turkey was on full display for the whole day and this photo is typical of what the rugged rocky and forested coastline looks like.

Total trip time anchor to dock was about 13.5 hours so our average speed was 8.1 knots.  We will continue to play with the various combinations of Mr. Gee’s RPM and the CPP pitch settings to bring the speed up more and more and find the Goldilocks “sweet spot” for speed, fuel economy and ideal loads.


Progress Update on Christine and XPM Hulls #2 & 3

We rented a car for Tuesday morning and drove down to the hospital in Antalya for Christine’s checkup and to get the stitches removed.  Typical of our experiences with Turkish medical treatment at least at this hospital, it took less than 20 minutes from the time Christine walked in with no appointment to when she was back out front of the hospital stitches removed and an A+ report card from her surgeon.  She is still not getting off the boat too much yet but the swelling is way down as is the pain and she is able to walk more and more around the boat so a full recovery is looking more and more likely.  Doc said she could go swimming as of today (Sunday) so we will probably go for our first swim of the year when I get this blog posted.
PXL_20220615_122703063While we were in Antalya, we asked Naval Yachts if we could stop by the Free Zone to see how the two new XPM builds are going and this is what XPM78-02 “Vanguard” is looking like.
PXL_20220615_122810000And this is what XPM85-01 is looking like while still upside down getting all the hull plates welded on.  She is due to flip right side up next month which is always a very big milestone in a build and we could not be more excited for her owners Andrew and Lili.
PXL_20220615_122816018A view of Vanguard from the rear Port quarter.  Those with detailed eyes will perhaps notice that the owners have decided to paint the hull so you can see the first coat of primer has been applied to the hull sides.
PXL_20220615_123345893One of the major differences between our XPM78-01 and this second version is that it will be a twin engine/prop boat.  These are the partially completed skegs that house the prop shafts.
PXL_20220615_123439385.MPNo change here on the Swim Platform with the doghouse for entering into the Engine Room and the same stairs on boat sides leading up to the Aft Deck.
PXL_20220615_123452450With twin JD engines the Engine Room will be much more traditional with a full beam layout but this comes at the expense of the Workshop we have in Möbius with the smaller central ER for Mr. Gee.  The Basement has also been eliminated on Vanguard so the ER will also have most of the systems equipment located within as well.
PXL_20220615_123825454Up above on the Aft Deck the cantilevered roof is much longer and more substantial than on Möbius which will provide more shelter underneath and space for solar panels above.
PXL_20220615_123916736.MPThese are the drawings and renderings for one of the two guest cabins, this one located at the very front near the forepeak.
PXL_20220615_124054850Construction of the furniture for this cabin has begun and this will be the cabin for the Owners’ young son.
PXL_20220615_124102153Shower and toilet in the cabin’s Head.
PXL_20220615_124227048Probably the biggest single difference between Möbius and Vanguard is that they have replaced the Basement underneath the floor of the Salon with this spacious Master Cabin.  To get the additional 1.2m of  headroom needed, the tank tops have been lowered and the whole Salon has been raised.  Provides a significant increase in the sleeping area but comes at the expense of storage so all part of the compromises of designing and building a boat that best matches her owners.
PXL_20220615_124929172.MPThe additional height is easy to see when you notice how the bottom of the Salon windows now sit about 40cm above the deck where they are almost flush on Möbius.
PXL_20220615_124937198Another very visible difference with the addition of these tall bulwarks that run down the entire length of both sides of the deck.  Will make for a much safer feeling that many prefer when traversing these side decks.
PXL_20220615_125017670Seen from the Aft Deck of Vanguard, the stern of XPM85-01 shows how it too will be a twin engine boat and the two prop tunnels are easy to see now.
PXL_20220615_125045587A worm’s eye view underneath the XPM85 shows how the upside down framing is supported by the steel structure attached to the concrete floor of the shipyard.
PXL_20220615_125055189Still a long way to go and a LOT of welding but they are off to a good start as you can see looking up into what will be the Engine Room of the XPM85.
PXL_20220615_125333603Looking aft from the bow, the plates for the sides of the hull are being held in alignment by all these sacrificial AL bars.  The plates are pushed/pulled into alignment and then these bars are tack welded to hold the plates in position for the MIG welders to sew together all the seams.
PXL_20220615_125345569Same “crash bulkhead” bow design and central anchor snubber nose cone.
PXL_20220615_125148319As exciting as it was to see all the progress on these next two XPM hulls, what really got our hearts racing was finding this completed new beam for the Davit Arch on Möbius!  We are ever so appreciative of Naval Yachts getting this replacement beam fabricated in record time.  All thanks to Dennis’ even speedier redesign and testing of this new beam so our thanks to all.  I’ve arranged for a bonded truck to bring it from the Free Zone to Finike this coming week and with any luck I’ll be able to show you the new and improved Davit Arch installed and working on Möbius in next week’s update.

Paravane Progress

Paravane rigging System v2We have decided to go with passive rather than active stabilization, at least for the foreseeable future and will use a pair of A-frame booms that can be lowered to about 45 degrees off each side of the Aft Deck.  The aluminium booms have been installed for some time now so this week I was finally able to do the rigging to raise/lower the booms.
PXL_20220618_133023316As with most of the other rigging on Möbius I am using synthetic rope most commonly known as Dyneema or Amsteel.  As incredible as it sounds this new age line is stronger than multi stand stainless steel wire and is SO much easier to rig and replace.  It is easily cut with this “hot knife” and I just wrap the location of the cut with grey PVC tape and then slice through the line with the red hot blade.  This leaves a very nicely fused end on the line so it does not unravel and is easy to handle.
PXL_20220618_124329823.MPThis is the setup that will raise and lower the booms from vertical when stowed to about 45 degrees when deployed. Very simple setup with the end of the line attached to the bracket on the left which is about half way up the 6.2m/20ft long boom pole and then over through the black turning block and down to the winch below.

Deploying the paravane booms is a simple matter of slipping the line on the winch to lower the boom until ……


PXL_20220618_133653299…….. the fixed length support line at the end of the boom goes tight.
PXL_20220618_144447113Looking up from deck level where it is easy to reach and turn the winch handle.
PXL_20220618_133904146Easy to see from this view from the dock.  One side all done.
PXL_20220618_144003986Both sides done and this is what it looks like with both paravane booms fully extended. 
LarryM fish in water with retreival lineI grabbed this shot from some posts on the Trawler Forum boat “Hobo” to show what it will look like with the paravanes or “fish” as they are often called deployed when underway.  Each paravane/fish is suspended by a 9m length of Dyneema from the ends of each boom such that they “fly” through the water about 6m/20ft below the surface and about 5m off the sides of the hull. 
As the boat tries to roll, one vane resists being pulled up while the other one “dives” down and sets up to resist as the roll goes over to the other side.  A bit like the tight rope walker’s pole works.  Paravanes also have the benefit of working at anchor as well so no more being tossed out of bed in a rolly anchorage!
Canadian plywood   lead paravane WoodFish from Balder VIII on Trawler ForumSome of my fellow Canadian boaters have come up with this design for a DIY paravane and I’ll be using this to build the first pair for Möbius. 
PXL_20220619_123240022Plywood is surprisingly difficult to find here so Christine and I spent a few hours when we were in Antalya searching and finally finding a shop in the industrial zone that had some left over 20mm / 3/4” marine plywood left over and kindly agreed to cut the two pieces I need to build our paravanes.
Plywood paravane exampleWhen finished our paravanes will look very similar to these also off mv Hobo. 

White epoxy painted plywood with aluminium plate for the fin and line attachment.  We will use Dyneema rather than SS chain as shown here.

That’s the story for the week of June 13-19 here in Finike and hope your week was similarly productive.  Thanks for taking the time to join us here and please do add any and all comments or questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  Hope to have you here with us again next week.

-Wayne





Rest & Recovery XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Update 6-12 June, 2022

IMG_0936
We have stayed for a second week here in Netsel Marina in Marmaris as this past week was a purposely slow one after Christine’s knee surgery the week before to repair a torn meniscus.  She has been very diligent in following her surgeon’s orders to rest, ice the knee regularly for the first week and slowly start putting more weight on it with short walks around the boat.  Swelling was down and feeling better each day so she took her first trip ashore in almost two weeks on Friday.  We walked a few hundred meters up the concrete docks here in Netsel Marina in Marmaris and enjoyed dinner out at a small café on the docks.  Weather has been ideal with daytime temps just over 30C/86F and cool sleeping temps around 20C/68 at night.


IMG_0934Marina life is not our cup of tea but it was just what the doctor ordered and made the most sense for a full recovery of Christine’s knee.  The marina here in Marmaris is quite large and very full of charter boats of all shapes and sizes.  We spend a lot of our time up in the SkyBridge on Möbius and this is the view off our bow where there is a constant parade of boats going in and out of the marina. 
IMG_0926Makes for great entertainment with little guys like this coming in to either pick up or drop off guests or make a very $$$$ stop at the fuel dock which was where this guy was headed.
Sailing Writer on SubStack screen grabChristine has started a new edition of her Sailing Writer newsletters using SubStack and in the latest one she published earlier this week she wrote about her whole experience of “Living the Dream” as the cruising life is often described.  You can read that HERE and also see the other newsletters she has written and subscribe to get them automatically in the future if you like.

We are also both using this time to ease our way through the transition out of full on boat building mode that we’ve been in for the past four plus years and back into cruising mode so I’ve been tackling at least one boat job a day, researching and designing new bits of kit for the boat and getting back to reading about topics that pique my curiosity such as quantum physics and some of the fascinating new thinking about time.  As one of my all time favorite teachers and mentors Richard Feynman once put it “If you think you understand quantum physics, you don’t understand quantum physics.”  and “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.” , which definitely includes me but I do like trying to understand it a bit a little bit better and find the whole topic just mind bogglingly interesting.

PXL_20220606_131434472One of the more satisfying jobs I got done this past week was finally buttoning up Mr. Gee by bolting on the valve rocker covers that I had polished up to give him just a wee bit more Gardner style “bling”.  I have left them off most of the time up to now as I wanted to keep a close eye on things as I put on more engine hours and one nice feature of these LXB motors is that they don’t spit any oil when the valve covers are off.  Also made it easy for me to do several valve adjustments along the way to make sure those are all just right. 
PXL_20220606_131441545.MPBut with about 40+ hours now and all going well I wanted to seal and bolt these covers on to keep out any foreign matter and to give him a bit more polished and finished look. 

What do you think?
Tomorrow I will head into some of the many marine stores in town to pick up some of the supplies I need for other boat jobs on the list such as oil for the first oil change on Mr. Gee after the last rebuild and some hardware and lines that I need for rigging the paravanes. 

Marmaris Bay sattelite shotThen on Monday afternoon we will head out of the marina which is the blue dot at the top center of this sat photo, and go over to a nice little anchorage for the night just the other side of  island you can see in the bottom left.  Christine needs to go back to the hospital in Antalya so we will cruise back over to our winter port in Finike which should take us about 10 hours and we can get an early morning start off our anchorage.
We know Finike well and it is a short drive to Antalya which makes it easy for us to provision and work on Möbius to finish the boat jobs we want done before we head out for Athens to meet up with our granddaughters and family the first week of July.

I hope all of you have June and the summer off to a good start and thanks so much for taking the time to join us on this adventure.  Please keep the comments coming in the “Join the Discussion” box below and we’ll see you here again next Sunday.

-Wayne

The Pressure is ON! XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Update 30 May-5 June, 2022

Marmaris   marina at nightWe have spent this past week in the relatively small but very marine based town of Marmaris.
map-showing-marmaris-turkey-with-a-red-pin-3d-rendering-2F9749BFor orientation, here is Marmaris relative to the others nearby islands and coastline around us.
Turquoise CoastYou’ll recall this map from previous posts and we started out in Antalya where Möbius was built and have been slowly making our way West and North along the Turquoise Coast.  We spent the winter in Finike and left there to begin our cruising season back on May 17th.  As you have read in the previous weekly updates since then we have stopped in Kekova, Kaş, Fethiye, Göcek and now Marmaris.
Netsel Marina Marmaris aerial view labelledWe have spent the past week here in Netsel Marina in Marmaris and the arrow shows where Möbius is docked.
Netsel Marina Marmaris aerial view 2The city of Marmaris itself isn’t that large but as you can see the marina is literally part of the city.
Map of Setur Marinas in TurkeyNetsel is one of the 10 Setur Marinas along the Turquoise Coast that we have access to as part of our annual contract with Setur Marinas.  If you click to enlarge you can all the red Setur Marina pins.  Antalya is the most Eastern Setur Marina and then the other 9 marinas are spread out as the coastline moves West and North to Istanbul. 

Christine’s Knee Update

This is a very large and very full marina and not usually our cup of tea but as I mentioned last week, Christine had torn her meniscus in her left knee and getting that fixed became our #1 priority and Marmaris was the best place to put in to.  After several appointments with doctors in several other ports we stopped at along the way we decided that the best course of action was to go back to the same hospital in Antalya that we both had outstanding experience with while living there.  Sunday morning Christine made the 6+ hour ride on a very luxurious bus that she said was more like an airline than a bus and on Monday morning she met with the surgeon who specializes in arthroscopic knee surgery at 9:30.  After going over all the specifics of Christine’s history with this knee, their consensus was that arthroscopic surgery was the best choice.  The surgeon asked “When would you like to have the surgery done?” and when she said as soon as possible he said “OK, how about tomorrow?”.  Fifteen minutes later Christine was in a hospital bed being prepped for surgery on Tuesday.  As amazing as this might sound to many of you, this is our experience with hospitals and medical care in Turkey and makes it easy to understand why Antalya in particular is such a popular destination for medical tourism.

Good news is that the surgery went very well and both the surgeon and Christine were very pleased so I rented a car on Wednesday morning, packed the pups and was in Antalya by noon to pick Christine up and bring her back to Möbius.  She has been confined to the boat since then which has been challenging for her but as per the title of this week’s update, one of the ways in which “The Pressure is ON” is that she has been able to put more and more pressure on the knee as she hobbles around Möbius a bit better each day.  While not something any of us would want this has been one of those good reminders of just how important our health and mobility is and as Christine soon remarked “I had no idea we had so many steps on this boat!”.

The surgeon wants to see Christine again in about two weeks so we are now thinking that it may be best to motor our way back East and get closer to Antalya for her follow up and to make sure that she has her knee well looked after.  Stay tuned for updates on where we decide to go next.

Oil Pressure is ON too!

Dual oil pressure gaugesYou may recall from the great oil pressure hunt with Mr. Gee, I had installed two oil pressure gauges after discovering that the original one had been falsely reading 20 PSI too low and causing me a LOT of angst until I discovered this.  Mr. Gee now has over 40 hours of run time and has been purring along with a steady 35 PSI of oil pressure just as a healthy Gardner 6LXB should and so one of my jobs this week was to create the more permanent setup for monitoring Mr. Gee’s oil pressure.
PXL_20220603_140942645.MPHere is the cleaned up and likely permanent setup on the four port bronze oil pressure manifold on the side of the oil filter.  Moving down from the liquid dampened oil pressure gauge on top, the other three ports are:

     1.  black pipe that takes pressurized oil over to the valve rockers on each head,

     2.  Silver fitting that takes oil pressure through a flexible hose over to an electric oil pressure sensor mounted on the opposite side of the black oil filter housing

     3.  Low Oil pressure warning switch which will also provide power to the engine hour meter anytime Mr. Gee is running
PXL_20220603_140927749.MPThe silver canister is the electric oil pressure sensor which sends its analog data over to ………
PXL_20220327_122546988  …… this Actisense EMU-1 engine monitor which converts all the analog engine data such as oil pressure, oil & coolant temperature, CPP oil temp & pressure, into digital signals and sends these onto our N2K network that is used to communicate ALL the boat’s data to the boat computers and onto any of the six monitors we have on the Upper and Lower Helm stations as well as broadcasting this wirelessly to our phones, tablets and any other monitors we chose.
PXL_20220605_125829832This is an example of the kind of dashboards that Christine is building using our Maretron N2K View software which allows us to create virtual gauges, switches, warning lights, alarms, etc.  We are slowly learning our way around this eXtremely powerful and diverse tool but we have a long ways to go and there really is no end to the different screens, gauge types, switches, alarms, lights, logs, graphs and other info we can display using this Maretron N2K View software.
Maretron N2K View Mobile Engine DataThere is also a free Maretron N2K View mobile app which we have on our phones so we can also see all this data on these screens as well.  Not something we use a lot as the larger screens provide a much more comprehensive collection of data on their larger real estate at each Helm but the phones are super handy when you are somewhere else on the boat and just want to check how things are working.  I also tend to use this while I’m working on some system somewhere else on the boat and can use my phone to show me what’s going on as I adjust things in the Engine Room or down in the Basement where most of the Victron electronics are located.  eXtremely handy and powerful and will only get more so as we learn to use these tools better over time and create all the Goldilocks displays that each of us prefer.
PXL_20220605_125902758.MPNow that we had Mr. Gee’s oil pressure on the N2K network via the EMU-1, we were able to create the virtual oil pressure gauge you see here and with a bit of tweaking we were able to configure this so that the pressure shown on this gauge matched the PSI shown on the liquid filled gauge on Mr. Gee.  Having all this data able to be displayed on any screen on the boat is a huge benefit while we are underway keeping us fully informed as to how everything on the boat is functioning.  We have a LOT of work to do to build out all the various screens we want for different contexts but this is a good start for now.

Configuring the Auto Pilots

PXL_20220605_130518956While I was in configuration mode I decided to also finish configuring our two Furuno 711C Auto Pilots.  The 711C display head you see on the bottom Left of the Main Helm provides all the data and controls for our Auto Pilots and there is a duplicate setup at the Upper Helm on the SkyBridge.  To the right of the 711C AP is the Furuno Jog Lever which is the second way we can steer the boat by simply moving that Black knob whichever way we want the rudder to move. 
The rotary switch to the Right of the Jog Lever is used to select which of the two helm stations is active.  The two silver levers on the far Right are how we control the throttle and the pitch.

Took a few hours but all of these are now working properly and next trip we will do the final tweaks to the Auto Pilot while we are underway and can dial in the actual zero rudder position.  These Furuno AP’s have the very great feature of “auto learning” and so as we use the boat more the AP system is learning the specifics of how Möbius handles, turns, rolls, etc. and uses this to dial in all the settings better and better over time.

Of course this being a boat, there were plenty of other little gremlins and “moles” to whack back down like the house water pump that I just spent the past 5 hours replacing today, but that’s how our start to yet another new month played out and I hope that yours was equally productive. 

How can it be another month already and almost half way through 2022?!?  However, with our recent reminder as to how precious time is we continue to be grateful for every day that speeds by and can only hope to have many more to come and enjoy each one as it passes.

Hope you will join us again for next week’s update and till then please be sure to add your comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne