Jiminy Cricket!  Möbius is OFFICIALLY a REAL BOAT!

Jiminy Cricket! Möbius is OFFICIALLY a REAL BOAT!

As you will soon see, Summer is not the only thing that is officially here.  Captain Christine has now officially registered XPM78-01 Möbius with the Jersey Ships Registry in the island Port of Jersey and I can’t resist the chance to start off this week’s update with this riddle:

Wayne-with-old-CDN-flag_thumbCan you find the TWO Canadian’s in this photo?
While you ponder that question and search the photo above for that missing 2nd Canadian, a few more details on our choosing to register our new boat/home Möbius in Jersey which should provide you with a few more clues to solve the riddle above. 

Jersey-Channel-Islands-_-JTs-Gigabit[2]Quick history & geography update;

  • Jersey is one of the Channel Islands which lie Gulf of St. Malo in the English Channel between the south coast of England and the North coast of France. 
  • Not to be confused with its neighboring island of Guernsey nor with New Jersey in the USA, as per this overview on Wikipedia Jersey, officially the Bailiwick of Jersey (who knew Bailiwick was a real word?!?), is a British Crown dependency[8] located near the coast of Normandy, France.[9]
    Some other Fun Facts for you about Möbius’ new Home Port, the Bailiwick of Jersey:
  • Jersey was part of the Duchy of Normandy, whose dukes went on to become kings of England from 1066.
  • After Normandy was lost by the kings of England in the 13th century, and the ducal title surrendered to France, Jersey and the other Channel Islands remained attached to the English crown.
  • Jersey has a separate relationship to the Crown from the other Crown dependencies of Guernsey and the Isle of Man, although all are held by the monarch of the United Kingdom.[13]
  • Jersey is a self-governing parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarchy, with its own financial, legal and judicial systems,[5] and the power of self-determination.[14] The Lieutenant Governor on the island is the personal representative of the Queen.
  • Jersey is not part of the United Kingdom,[15] and has an international identity separate from that of the UK,[16] but the UK is constitutionally responsible for the defence and international relations of of Jersey.[17]
  • Population (2019 estimate) is 107,000
  • Currency is British Pound sterling
  • Time Zone is Greenwich Mean Time UTC 0:00

    Jersey-location-on-map_thumb

OK, all very interesting Wayne but WHY register Möbius in Jersey?

Short list of reasons we chose Jersey includes:


  • Location of Jersey (green)in Europe (dark grey)
     
    • As a Canadian I am amongst the few who qualify to register our boat with the British Registry of Ships in Jersey and fly the Jersey Red Ensign flag.
    • When traveling under the Jersey Red Ensign flag we have the full support of British consular services and British Royal Navy protection worldwide.
    • VAT-free temporary importation into EU for non-EU residents
    • Renewal every 10 years with no annual charge

MVIMG_20200627_113738_thumbOK, back to the riddle.  Did you find the second Canadian in this photo?

Canadian-Red-Ensign-1921-1965_thumbThe second Canadian is the flag! 

You would have to know your flag history MUCH better than I do to have spotted this, but the flag I am holding is the Canadian Red Ensign used from 1921 to 1965 ……
Flag_of_Canada-Canadian-maple-leaf-f[2]…… until the current Red Maple Leaf flag was adopted in 1965.[1] The Maple Leaf flag also replaced the Canadian Red Ensign as the civil ensign of the country.
Way more than you ever wanted to know about Canadian flags I’m sure but for Christine, who came up with the whole idea,  and I this is the perfect Goldilocks just right flag for us to sail under on Möbius.

Getting back to where I started this latest tangent, to complete the formal registration of XPM78-01 Möbius in the Bailiwick of Jersey we needed to send them photos to prove that we had “marked and carved” as it is officially called, the transom of the boat with the correct sized and placed letters of the boat’s name and Port of Registration.

Printing-vinyl-Mobius-name-letters_t

Earlier in the week Christine rode her bicycle over to a printer she had discovered last year and they printed out a set of vinyl self adhesive Black block letters of Möbius  and Jersey.
IMG_20200616_152722_thumb3Meanwhile, I did a quick layout of our Official Number and Gross Tonnage on a piece of 5mm aluminium plate to be my guide as I used my fabulous little Milwaukee cordless router to carve these numbers. 
IMG_20200617_183119_thumb1I gave it a quick sand blast, painted over all the numbers with some Black spray paint and then sanded the surface to reveal just the numbers.
MVIMG_20200617_182937_thumb

Asper the requirements of the Jersey Ship’s Registry, “the official number and the tonnage calculation should be permanently carved or marked on a small plaque which should be fixed onto the main beam or on a readily accessible visible permanent part of the structure inside the vessel.  A plaque is usually approximately 20cms x 10cms and should contain the official number and tonnage figure.”
And there you go XPM78-01 Möbius is officially ship # 749887.


IMG_20200626_124836_thumbOn her weekly Friday inspection Christine brought along the vinyl letters and while everyone else was at lunch we carefully laid out and applied the letters on the Aft Transom.
MVIMG_20200626_131458_thumbThese vinyl letters are just a temporary stand in while we await the arrival of the CNC waterjet cut aluminium letters but were enough for us to take the required pictures to send to the Port of Jersey Registrar.
IMG_20200626_132429_thumbIn my youth I once had a job putting decals and lettering on semi trailer tankers so I knew the trick about spraying the surface with some water and dishwashing liquid so you can float the letters onto the aluminium plate and still adjust their position to line each one just right and we soon had the job done.


D8F19676-8B7C-400F-8383-884031A21980[2]We called in some cheap labour to do a bit of final cleanup.
IMG_20200626_133403_thumbAnd soon had our boat all officially named and ready for some photos to prove it.
IMG_20200626_135357_thumbFirst photos we needed are to prove the height of the letters of the boat name and at 160mm/6” tall we are well above the minimum 100mm requirement and that’s all the photos we needed and Christine has sent these on their way to Jersey and they will mail us the official paper Registration document. 


IMG_20200626_135231_thumbWith the stern of Möbius backed up against the aft wall of the shipyard it wasn’t easy to get a shot from the rear like this but I managed to climb up onto a little ledge on the wall and squeeze off this shot to send to the Jersey officials.
MVIMG_20200626_133401Lucky me; in my eyes and heart I’ve got the most Beautiful Bride AND the most beautiful Boat there is!

Our new “baby” is born!  Please join us in welcoming XPM78-01 Möbius to the world.

Displacing a mere 66.83 Gross Tons, little # 749887 in the British Ships Registry and our newest boat and home has officially arrived.

Did I happen to mention that this is an eXciting new milestone for both of us?!!

Beauteous of Works of Art & Engineering: XPM78-01 Möbius: Progress Update Dec 16-21, 2019

Beauteous of Works of Art & Engineering: XPM78-01 Möbius: Progress Update Dec 16-21, 2019

Say it isn’t so?!!  We’re heading into the last week of the year?  How the heck did THAT happen so fast??

In my naïve youth I used to think that time would slow down as you got older and especially when you “retired” but I’ve never been busier in my life and time has never whizzed by faster.  I think that the reality is that time is one of the few constants in life and doesn’t care how old we are, how busy we are, how much we need to get done, it just ticks away like some rock solid metronome one second at a time.  Back in 2009 I recall a similar year end experience in what was then my second year of single handed sailing around the world in my former sailboat sv Learnativity, where I was recalling all the different experiences I had been through in the past two years and not being able to believe it was possible that ALL that could have happened in just two years.  Drove me crazy for a week as I was sure that somehow my “math” was wrong because it MUST have been more like fife years.  But nope, it was just two.  Over time, hehehe, I came up with the notion of Learning/Living Density or simply Experiential Density and that is perhaps the variable; same amount of seconds in the year, just varying amount of experiences, learning and living for each of us.  Whatever the case 2019 has been a year VERY densely packed full of awemazing experiences and learning for Christine and I and I would hope that is the case for all of you as well.  But enough philosophising and let’s get busy reviewing the density of experiences building Möbius this past week of December 16-21, 2019

STEERING SYTEM:

IMG_20191120_121849As per part of the title there was some eXciting progress with on the Steering related equipment on XPM78-01 this week as well as many other systems and I’ll take you through all of those as well, however steering is perhaps THE most important system on any boat and especially on a power boat and eXceptionally so on an XPM given the eXtremely remote locations we and other eXtreme Passage Maker type boats tend to roam. 
IMG_20191120_121842On a sailboat if you were to lose all your steering such as having your rudder fall off then it is relatively easy to steer the boat using the sails.  Ask me how I know! 
IMG_20191120_121901However with no sails if we were to ever somehow loose ALL steering capability on Möbius about the only option we would have would be to use one or our drogues or other warps you can fashion from long knotted or weighted lines and drag them off the Swim Platform and change the direction of the boat by moving the attachment point from side to side. 
IMG_20191118_105539All that being a VERY Waynewinded way of saying that we take the Steering System on the XPM’s VERY seriously.  Uğur will help give you a better sense of size and scale of the rudder so you can see that it is both eXtremely strong and eXtremely big.

The other photos above show the rudder in various stages of construction and it is now all complete and ready to be installed so let’s go check out this week’s progress.
IMG_20190919_145617These are the pair of self aligning PETP roller bearings which I worked closely with Thor Christen Hermann. the Systems Designer at Jefa Rudder Bearings in Greve Denmark to get them just right.  Thor and everyone at Jefa was fabulous to work with and I can recommend them highly for any of your rudder related needs.


Jeffa rudder bearing Xsection diagram w rudder postIn the photo above the bearing on the left is the top bearing, lower on the right and the white ring in the middle is a thrust bearing to deal with any vertical forces and the black ring is anodized aluminium lock ring that is secured to the Rudder Post with locking setscrews.  This section view from Jefa clearly shows how these bearings are mounted inside the yellow coloured rudder tube which is an integral component welded into the hull’s framing.
IMG_20190919_145652A closer look at the lower bearing lets us see the black rollers for the 127mm/5’” aluminium Rudder post to smoothly glide on and down by my thumb you can see how the white inner race with these rollers inside, rotates inside the white spherical outer race which is fasted into the top and bottom of the Rudder Tube as seen above.

IMG_20191216_102927Next up, the 200mm/8” thick walled aluminium Rudder Tube is tacked in place after being precisely positioned with laser levels such that it is perfectly aligned in all directions and exactly on the centerline of the hull.

Let’s go see where those beautiful tendrils of smoke are coming from?

IMG_20191216_102634Aha!  Now that Uğur and Nihat have tacked the Rudder Tube into position and also tacked on the additional 25mm/1” thick support braces, everything can be fully welded into the hull.
IMG_20191216_154822This is one of the last major welding jobs to be completed and only leaves the installation of the Nogva CPP propeller and shaft to literally float our boat in the sense that she will be fully watertight.

Naval is using the latest Pulse MIG welders and in photos like this one you can actually see the pulses refracting the light which I thought was cool.
IMG_20191216_102705Good comparative shot of the tack welds and the fully finished welds around the circumference of the Rudder Post where it exits out the top of the curved 15mm/ 5/8” plate of the Prop Tunnel.
IMG_20191216_122508That same area now fully welded on the inside ….
IMG_20191216_154700… bottom of the Rudder Tube fully welded on the outside…..
IMG_20191216_154958 … and top of the Rudder Tube fully welded to the Rudder Shelf inside the very aft end of the Workshop area.  Door on the left puts you out on the Swim Platform.
IMG_20191220_104159

Once everything cooled down the Jefa Rudder Bearings could be test fit into the Rudder Tube and we are looking up from under the boat to see the bottom Rudder Bearing here. 


Next step will be to pump a special adhesive through a hole drilled through the side of the Rudder Tube and out a hole in the other side to fill up the special groves in the outer white bearing race and solidly affix the outer bearing to the Rudder Tube.
OK, we’ve got a Rudder, we’ve got a Rudder Tube and Rudder Bearings, but how do we TURN the Rudder?


IMG_20191218_172918Oh right!  The Tiller Arm I designed and has now been fully machined and fresh off the table of the CNC milling machine over at Tasot.  If you’ve been following these weekly progress updates recently you’ll recall seeing this at huge block of aluminium being machined into the finished beauty you see here.
IMG_20191220_115855I walked over to Tasot a few days ago with my rolling cart and brought this work of art and engineering over to Naval to test fit it to the Rudder Post. 

Easy to see how these two halves will be clamped to the top of the Rudder Post with four long M16 bolts running through the four holes in the wings of the body of the Tiller Arm.
IMG_20191220_115926These hardened and precision ground 25mm/1” OD pins are a close sliding fit into the Tiller Arm.
IMG_20191220_115936Providing a super strong axis for the Heim joint ends of the two big Kobelt hydraulic steering cylinders we will see shortly below.  Locking nuts threaded onto the ends of these pins will hold them in place.
IMG_20191220_120741Back at Naval now for the first test fit.  I have implicit trust in 3D models and the precision of CNC machining but we didn’t take the Rudder over to Tasot while the Tiller Arm was being machined so it was a great feeling to set this half onto the Rudder Post and have it fit perfectly!
IMG_20191220_120655And of course the other half fit just right too.

Note the 18mm wide keyway cut into the top of the Rudder Post and in the photo above you can see the matching keyway cut into the Tiller Arm body.


The large through hole at the top of the Rudder Post is also part of the Steering System, the very end of the chain of redundancy and backups.  There is a 70mm/2 3/4” OD thick walled aluminium pipe that is 2m/6.5′ long that can be inserted into this hole in the top of the Rudder Post and be used as an Emergency Steering Tiller. 
At the other end of this Emergency There are attachment points for block and tackle lines to run from the end of this Tiller to the hull frames on each side which would be used to lock the Tiller pipe in any location and move it as needed to steer.  Obviously a bit of kit we hope to never use, though we will test on sea trials, but all part of the “belt and suspenders” approach we take for Steering and throughout the whole boat which enables us to be “Ready for the Unexpected”.

IMG_20191220_121126

Continuing with this “knee bone connected to the thigh bone” and connecting the dots of the Steering System components, we now need to connect the Tiller Arm to the Kobelt hydraulic cylinders and that is what this next bit of Steering beauty is for.  The bronze part in my hand is technically referred to as a Heim joint which is a spherical ball and socket type of joint which transfers the force from the Steering Cylinder to the Tiller Arm.


IMG_20191220_121037Kobelt equipment is eXtremely robust with their two favorite materials being bronze and stainless steel which you will be seeing a LOT of in the coming weeks as we get all the Kobelt equipment installed.  With this Heim joint you can see how it is built to last for thousands of hours at sea with very little maintenance.  A quick squirt of grease in that Zerk fitting to ensure these spherical SS ball and bronze socket are well lubricated and don’t wear is about all that should be needed throughout the long lifetime of these critical joints.
OK, so now the Heim joint connects to ………???


IMG_20191220_121317

This next example of the result when art meets engineering are these Kobelt 76mm/3” ID 7018 Hydraulic Steering Cylinders. 
IMG_20191220_121331The mounting base is where the cylinder is through bolted to thick pads on the Rudder Shelf you saw earlier.  This is another SS/Bronze spherical joint the same as the Heim joint at the other end just encapsulated in this cast bronze base and again a simple Zerk fitting to keep this joint well lubricated, friction free and long lasting.
IMG_20191220_121352And the Heim joint threads onto the other end of the SS shaft Steering Cylinder tom complete the Steering System’s connection to the Tiller Arm.
But wait!  What causes those big beefy hydraulic cylinders to move in and out you might ask, and I’m so glad you did.

IMG_20191219_142422Because I get to show you the final entry into this week’s Art & Engineering Beauty pageant, these Kobelt/Accu-Steer HPU400 Hydraulic Power Units.  The anodized blue assembly on the right end is the very powerful hydraulic pump and the white cylinder under my hand is the 24V motor that drives the pump.  There are two of these two speed pumps, one for each cylinder and we designed these with Kobelt engineers such that one pump and one cylinder exceed the steering requirements under the most severe conditions. 
IMG_20191219_142414Most of the time we will run them this way, one pump/one cylinder and alternate between the two every day or two when we are on multi week passages so we know they are both working and to keep them balanced for wear and use.  If conditions were severe we can chose to run both pumps and both cylinders at the same time for even more power.  In situations such as close quarter maneuvering such as docking in tight spaces, we can switch the pumps to their high speed and cut our 45 degree lock to lock time, 90 degrees total, in half.

Stay tuned for upcoming episodes where we are installing these pumps.


IMG_20191220_115034Some of which Cihan (right) and Okan already got started on this week as well.  They are busy making the two AL shelves to mount the two Accu-Steer HPU400 suspended above the Tiller Arm in the aft end of the Workshop.
IMG_20191220_115045The shelves have flat bar edges so that any spills of hydraulic oil over time are contained and easy to spot as well as easy to clean up.  The three L-bar pieces tacked in place are for the six SS and rubber isolation mounts that secure the HPU pumps in place and keep them running silently.  Next week you’ll see these shelves being mounted.


Whew!  And that only gets us through this week’s work on just the Steering System so let’s move on to the next area of progress; plumbing!


PLUMBING:

IMG_20191218_163822We’ll stay with the multi-talented team of Cihan and Okan as they work on more of their plumbing jobs down in the Basement.  While they were in the fabricating mood and tools they built this support rack for the Potable/Drinking Water tank. 
IMG_20191220_142101This poly tank is another example of the “Readiness for the Unexpected” approach in that it will hold 210L / 55 USG of fresh water that will be kept independent of the rest of the boat’s water tanks and domestic water systems.  It will be plumbed to an independent water pump and connected to a second faucet at the Galley sink.


IMG_20191220_142055The only potable water we allow onboard is what comes out of our 200L/52USG per hour watermaker, never any shore side water so we know the quality of the water is the highest, being essentially pure H2O.  However, there is always the chance, however remote, that the water in the six integral aluminium hull tanks could get contaminated or even more unlikely could escape.  So this tank with its own pump and filtration system will always be at the ready just in case the unexpected should happen.


The white unit on the right is the Vacuum Generator for the Guest Cabin VacuFlush toilet.


IMG_20191218_125119Above the VacuFlush Vacuum Generator is this manifold which controls the hot water flowing to the three zones of the in-floor heating in each Cabin.
IMG_20191217_163239Cihan has done his usual masterful job of installing these manifolds and picking up where we left off last week.  Domestic Hot Water DHW from the IsoTherm Calorifier flows into the red handled shiny SS upper Supply manifold and then out the three fittings with the red flow meters on top. 


Zone 1’s gray PVC/Red handle ball valve is dry fitted in the center to help determine the location of the circulation pump mounts which are the two aluminium L-bar pads on the right.  Zone 2’s pump will mount on the pads you can just see at the bottom right and more fully in the photo below.


IMG_20191217_163231After circulating through the 15mm PEX tubing embedded in the floors in each zone, the slightly cooler water flows into the bottom of the polished SS Return manifold  through the 3 SS threaded fittings below the 3 white flow control valves and returns the water back to the Calorifier via the black insulated PPR pipe with the blue handled SS ball valve.


There is a temperature gauge on both the Supply and Return lines to make it easy to see the temperature differential and performance of the system.  The vertical SS units on the left ends of each manifold are for draining/filling the system and for bleeding off any entrapped air.


IMG_20191216_122827These are the AL brackets which Cihan has come up with for mounting each of the three speed Zone Circulation Pumps to the bulkhead.
IMG_20191218_125142Here is the completed bracket test fitted to one of these pumps.  Longer bolts will be used with an additional nut on each end to keep the clamping of the pump’s sealing flange independent of the mounting nut.  Each one of these pump mounts will be bolted to those pads you saw in the photos above with rubber noise isolation separating the mounting bracket from the pads and keeping noise and vibration locked up in the Basement.


NOGVA CPP PROP & SHAFT

Well, let’s give Cihan and Okan a bit of a rest and move on to the ever busy Aluminium team of Nihat and Uğur.

IMG_20191217_162937After spending the weekend in the freezer to shrink, the orange coloured Cutlass bearing was pressed into the outboard end of the Nogva Prop Log Tube you saw being installed last week.  The groves in the upper half ensure that water flows freely out of the tube and provides a steady supply of clean water to lubricate the prop shaft. 
When rotating the prop shaft “floats” on a thin film of water so that the Cutlass Bearing material and the prop shaft only touch when the prop is not moving.


IMG_20191217_181519That all set the stage for the Nogva CPP Controllable Pitch Propeller to be test fit.  The smaller diameter end of the CPP prop hub at the bottom here is what fits inside the machined AL housing you see in the photo above.  The stepped flange slides in about half way 20mm/3/4” into the AL housing and acts as a rope guard when, never if, you happen to snag a lobster pot, fish net or other underwater debris.
IMG_20191217_181506At the opposite inboard end of the CPP Prop Shaft is the push/pull rod that runs inside the hollow prop shaft all the way from this threaded end to inside the bronze CPP prop hub.  As this rod is moved fore/aft by hydraulic pressure inside the Nogva CPP servo gearbox the bottom end of each of the four prop blades is rotated in synch to change the pitch from zero to full forward or full reverse.
IMG_20191118_102450Okan then gave the whole prop and shaft a thorough cleaning and a small army of men picked up the eXtremely heavy prop/shaft assembly and carefully slid it through the Cutlass Bearing until that stepped bronze end of the prop hub was the correct 20mm inside and attention can now turn to positioning the mounting brackets for the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox inside the Engine Room and which we will pick up on in next week’s installment.

ALUMINIUM WORK:

IMG_20191216_154850Speaking of the Engine Room, Nihat and Uğur were busy in there as well this week.  With that clue can you guess what they were working on based on this photo?
IMG_20191216_155737Full marks to those of you who guessed Sea Chests!  These are located at the very front end of the Engine Room with the larger Supply Sea Chest on the right and Exit on the left.  There will soon be two Vetus strainers flange mounted to the two pipes coming out of the Supply Sea Chest which will then both feed a sea water supply manifold for consumers such as the Water Maker, Gardner heat exchangers for cooling engine oil and coolant as well as the Nogva heat exchanger and then exiting into the wet exhaust system.


IMG_20191216_155848The 25mm/1” thick Engine/CPP beds are the flat sloped surfaces running top to bottom in this photo, water tanks on either side of them with their respective access ports bolted in place and SAE flanges around them for tank gauge senders and fill/supply lines.  Engine Room diaphragm Bilge Pumps can be seen on either side of the WT Bulkhead with the Guest Cabin/Office on the other side.


IMG_20191216_155803Not easy to get the MIG gun all the way down here but the welder did a great job of getting a full set of deeply penetrating welds around the circumference of this Supply Sea Chest.

WATERTIGHT DOORS:


IMG_20191219_120651Yet another exciting bit of progress was Nihat (left) and Uğur getting started on the frames for all the WT Doors!  They started with this door on the Port/Left side of the Swim Platform that provides access to the HazMat where we can safely store any Hazardous Materials such as diesel, paints, thinners, etc..
IMG_20191219_120701This one door they will build entirely in house here at Naval and the others will be high end WT fully certified WT doors from Bofor. 

Here they are fabricating and tacking in place the inner flanges for the HazMat door frame.
IMG_20191219_143013Which they complete very quickly,
IMG_20191220_141813With the exact sizes of the frame now set, they moved on to fabricating the HazMat door.
IMG_20191220_103140And had that knocked out just as quickly.  Next week they will fabricate and mount the hinges and seals.
IMG_20191220_104935Sliding over to the opposite Stbd/Right side of the Swim Platform they tacked the inner frame flange for the Bofor WT door.  These doors will be bolted in place with industrial adhesive in between to seal completely.

Bofor D0hg_exterior_duzeltilmisBofor is custom building all the WT doors for Möbius to our specifications but will look similar to this one.  To be fully WT certified there will be two dogs/locks at the top/bottom rather than one as you see here and our doors will be left unpainted AL to match the rest of the boat.

The WT off the Aft Deck into the SuperSalon will have a full length window whereas the one on into the Workshop and the one between the Guest Cabin/Workshop will have a single window like the example here.
IMG_20191220_104940With the mounting flange tacked in place, Nihat trims it to final opening size for the Bofor door frame to set into.
IMG_20191220_103945_MPCihan clowning it up to show how the door frame and flange look from inside the Workshop.  The Accu-Steer pumps and Tiller Arm you saw earlier in this post are sitting off to the right of this photo.
IMG_20191220_164221And before you know it the frame flange is fully welded in place and ready to have these corner welds cleaned up and radiused.

CABINETRY WORK:

IMG_20191217_163100More beauty to be found inside of Möbius this week as always.  Omur, Selim and Omer often get to steal the show as their expertise and craftsmanship really shines as they work with the rich grain patterns of the Rosewood.  This corner where the lower Freezer cabinet meets the taller Fridge cabinet is but the latest of many examples of their attention to detail with things such as matching the grain patterns to perfection.
IMG_20191218_125018Stepping back a bit from that same intersection to show how the grain swirls forward onto the wall cabinet for the 50” monitor on the Port side of the SuperSalon and Main Helm.
IMG_20191218_124959A few more steps back to show how the wall has been recessed for that large monitor.  It will be on a HD swiveling mount which allows us to pull it all the way out of the cabinet, swivel it forward and aft and tilt it up down.  This enables us to use this screen for both entertainment viewing of movies and photos from either the Lounge chairs or the Settee for our “dinner and a movie” nights and then quickly reposition it for ideal viewing from the Helm Chair when underway.
IMG_20191218_124830Yet another example of Ömür’s creativity and craftsmanship are these little cut outs so you can easily slide your fingers round the back of the monitor to pull it out.

IMG_20191217_163804Over in the Cabinetry Workshop with his compact sold edge router in hand, Omer shows one of his latest examples of grain matching mastery on this panel that will soon go into the Guest Cabin.
IMG_20191220_141926Back aboard Möbius and down in the Master Cabin, Omur and Selim start a new job of fabricating the laminated Rosewood liners for the insides of each of the ten hatches we designed and built in house.
IMG_20191220_103429They use this special laminating material which as you can see is extremely flexible and can be easily shaped and formed however you wish.
IMG_20191220_142013Solid wood corner blocks are glued in place to provide the backing for the large radius corners of each hatch.
IMG_20191220_164348Then successive thin layers are glued up, let dry and the next layer applied.

We will pick up on this process next week as the laminations continue and then the solid Rosewood edges and veneer goes on to finish these beauties off.

NEW ARRIVALS THIS WEEK:

IMG_20191217_172949The pace of ordering picks up as we get nearer the end of the build so there are more and more new arrivals showing up each week now and here are a few quick examples to leave you with.

Like these four bolts of leather for our interior walls and ceilings!

IMG_20191217_172955One bolt of black leather for the Helm Station surfaces and ceiling above to minimize reflections, one bolt of white leather for the removable ceiling panels and two bolts of this gray/green leather for the upper wall panels.  Can’t wait to see and be able to show you these as they get installed!
IMG_20191221_113340And then five cartons like this one from LiteMax in Taiwan.

Can you guess what’s inside?
IMG_20191221_113152

Yup, our five sunlight readable monitors! 

Two 19” ones side by side at the Main Helm station, two 24” side by side up in the SkyBridge Helm and one 43” on the Starboard/Right side of the Main Helm Chair.


IMG_20191221_113140

I think Captain Christine likes them.  As well she should as she spent months researching and tracking these down.  Our requirements are eXtreme as usual as we need monitors which are:

  1. Full Sunlight readability (1000 nits+) most new smartphones are about 200-280 nits
  2. Dimmable all the way to black for night watches using real front mounted buttons and knobs
  3. Multi-Touch enabled (PCAP)  same as your phone
  4. SXGA resolution 3840 x 2160 or better
  5. Waterproof & Ruggedized

Oh, and affordable too please! 


A tall order to say the least and Christine and I would like to give an eXtremely BIG shout out and thanks to Peter Hayden of mvTanglewood fame for all his help in the early stages of this search as a result of all his efforts in searching for monitors for his previous Nordhaven 62 and now the new N68 he is having built.  Peter had tracked down several of the companies who are the OEM Original Equipment Manufacturers for these kind of high end monitors for the marine industry.  If you are not familiar with Peter’s work on mvTanglewood and his constant flow of expertise on the Trawler Forum, do yourself a favor and go check this out ASAP.  Peter is an endless source of great ideas and expertise and writes outstanding explanations of his work and experiences.   A MUST read for Christine and I and we hope to share an anchorage with our two boats in the not too distant future.

This led us eventually to LiteMax in New Taipei City in Taiwan who make the monitors for airports, railways, stadiums, ATMs and the like and who were willing to make us the Goldilocks just right monitors for us.  It took several months of working with them to get these speced and built and then air freighted to us here in Antalya but they arrived his week and we could not be happier as you can see from my Captain’s face!

They only arrived on Friday and we had a busy Saturday with no time to do anything more than unbox one but we hope to get them setup and tested next week and will bring you more details then.  Just one of the literally thousands of decisions we make and problems we solve every week on this grand adventure of designing and building our just right new boat and home.

Thanks for joining us, please put your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below and we’ll see you here again next week.

– Wayne & Christine

Is it Live or is it Phantasmagoria?

Is it Live or is it Phantasmagoria?

For those of you too young to remember the title refers to a popular commercial in the 1970’s and 80’s for the leading edge of cassette audio tapes made by Memorex which were being touted as so good at capturing audio that they came up with the catchy marketing question; “Is it live or is it Memorex”.  Here is a little video clip of one of the many versions of this long running ad campaign featuring Ella Fitzgerald.

And if phantasmagoria is not in your vocabulary I would like to help you add it because it is a word which articulates what I believe is becoming a more and more common state of mind defined as “A dreamlike state in which images both real or imagined blur together”.  I’m experiencing this more and more as my day to day working on the design and building of Möbius involves constantly cycling between the visions for this boat I’ve had in my head for so long, the virtual worlds of 3D models and renderings and the real world of the ever evolving boat.

IMG_20190911_092837Then to add yet another dimension to all this phantasmagoria I’m experiencing, Naval Yachts recently had a scale model of our XPM78-01 built to be part of their booth at the Cannes Boat show last month.  If you click to enlarge this photo you can see the model of the XPM in the clear case on the right and one of the GN60 on the left.
IMG_20191011_140548After seeing a few pictures of this model in a previous post many of you wanted to see and know more about it so I thought I would post this short overview of this very nicely done model now that it is proudly on display in the reception area at Naval Yachts.
IMG_20191011_140830They only gave the poor model maker less than a month to build this from scratch and get it shipped to Cannes in time and I think he did a very good job.  He was given the whole 3D model, drawings and some renderings to work from and he captured a lot of the intricate details in the model which was all done by hand, no 3D printing involved.
IMG_20191011_140907A look into the Outdoor Galley just behind the aft end of the Pilot House with the SkyBridge above.
IMG_20191011_140845This is what the birds flying by the Starboard side will see as they are peering into the Helm up in the SkyBridge.


IMG_20191011_140825or this view of the Starboard side a bit further forward.
IMG_20191011_140539Good overall view from the bow with our “Sidewinder” anchor setup and the Dolphin watching seats which Uğur just welded in this week and you can see in the Weekly Update post to follow.
IMG_20191011_140602Finally, this perspective of the Aft Deck and Swim Platform.

I thought a bit of video might be a nice way to finish so created this little “simulated Drone fly by”.  My apologies in advance for the poor quality I didn’t have my stabilised holder with me so it is a bit shaky but I hope you enjoy it none the less.



Thanks for joining us and please leave your questions, comments and suggestions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne

Is it Live or is it Phantasmagoria?

HOLIDAY BONUS: Full Video Tour of mv Möbius for end of 2018

As I mentioned at the end of the previous blog with the usual weekly progress update on the building of our XPM78-01 Möbius, Christine and I have put together a special Holiday treat for all of you faithful followers; a fully annotated video with a guided tour through all the cabins and compartments.  Many of you have been asking for an update and for more video and seeing as how you have all been such good little girls and boys throughout 2018, your wish has been granted!

In the future you may want to be more careful what you wish for as this video is quite a bit longer than usual clocking in at 23 1/2 minutes.  However I have put in markers for each cabin or compartment so you should be able to fast forward or click on the timeline to spots that most interest you. 

Throughout the video I have overlaid some of the 2D drawings and 3D renders of the various locations on the boat to help you visualise what these currently empty spaces will look like once all the cabinetry and equipment gets installed. 

I will also insert each of these drawings and renders at the end of this post so you can refer to these on their own either as you are watching the video tour or whenever you might want to spend more time referring to the drawings and models.  Remember you can click on any photo or picture in any of these blog posts to see an enlarged view for closer inspection.

As with most things I do I’m a complete novice at this kind of video editing and I’m using all new software tools so please bear with me as I learn my way.  Apologies in advance for the poor sound and lighting quality in several spots.  I now have a new lavaliere microphone to use in future videos that should dramatically improve the audio quality and I’m working on smoothing out the light balance transitions.

It is tremendously valuable for me to get your feedback as I strive to continuously improve each posting.  Let me know for example what is working well for you, and even more so what’s not?  What kinds of information or methods would you like to see more of?  Less of?  Any and all other suggestions you have that will help me improve and make these videos and posts more informative, fun and engaging.  So I would be most appreciative of you adding your thoughts and reactions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

2018 has been what I always hope and wish for everyone at New Years; the best year yet.  It was another year densely packed full of awemazing adventures, lots of loving and learning, time with friends and family though never enough and now a whole year living, loving and learning here in Antalya Turkey with Naval Yachts. 

Our special thanks to Dennis at Artnautica Yachts for putting up with our never ending “feedback” over the past three years as he worked his naval design magic to turn our visions into all the 3D models and drawings you see here.  All of these are now being transformed into reality by the other very special thanks we have going out to Baris and Dincer who created Naval Yachts and put assembled the whole team of incredibly talented and dedicated people we feel so privileged to work with each day as part of Team Möbius,  

I often describe the process of designing and building Möbius as “a collaborative work of art and engineering” and you can all see why as you so kindly take your valuable time to watch these videos and read our weekly updates.  You too are part of this adventure and add to the joy and value we experience in living this dream.

Thank you one and all and here’s to continuing the great progress in 2019 so we can say the same thing this time next year: Wow!  That was the best year yet!

Happy New Year one and all,

Christine & Wayne

DRAWINGS:

Engine Room & Workshop

011 ER   Workshop Layout

SuperSalon: Galley, Helm, Lounge, Dining

011 SuperSalon Layout


Master Cabin

011 Master Cabin Layout

Guest Cabin / Christine’s Office
011 Guest Cabin CK Office Layout labelled

Overall Profile & Tanks
012 Interior GA inboard profile COLORED TANKAGE

3D RENDERS

Starboard Aft View of SkyBridge & Aft Deck
Stbd Aft SkyBridge

Starboard Fwd View of SkyBridge

Fwd Stbd SkyBridge

Aft Deck & Pilot House “Wings”
Wing Boxes

SkyBridge Aft labelled

SkyBridge Aft Stbd labelled artistic

SkyBridge Forward labelled
SkyBridge Fwd Stbd labelled

Swim Platform Layout
Swim Step layout

Engine Room & Workshop Layout
ER Workshop Layout artistic labelled

Christine’s Office Layout
Christine Office Artistic labelled

Guest Cabin Head & Shower, Corridor Workbench

Corridor Head Shower Guest Cabin Layout labelled

SuperSalon Layout

SuperSalon Layout labelled

Master Cabin Layout

Master Cabin Layout Fwd Port labelled


Is it Live or is it Phantasmagoria?

A VERY Moving Week! Building mv Möbius Nov. 19-23, 2018

Whew!  What a week here at Naval Yachts.  The time has finally come to start making the move to the brand new home of Naval Yachts here in the Antalya Free Zone.  The building isn’t fully finished yet but the shop side is ready so we started moving boats and as you are about to see Möbius was the first boat to move to her new home on Wednesday followed by Legacy on Thursday.  It was quite the experience and I’ll let the pictures and the videos at the end do most of the talking so here goes……..

IMG_20181120_120709Team Möbius wasn’t going to let moving interrupt their progress within the boat itself so let’s first take a look at that. 

Up on top of the aft end of the Starboard/Right side of the Pilot House roof the massive arch hinges are now tacked in place.


Arch up   down

As you’ll recall from seeing this rendering of the aft end of the Pilot House in previous posts, the arch is hinged where it passes through the roof of the Pilot House so that we can fold it down to Canal Mode to reduce our air draft or height above the water to sneak under lower bridges and locks.  This rendering shows the arch and SkyBridge roof in both the Green/Grey normal passage mode configuration as well as the purple folded down Canal Mode. 


You’ll note too how the bimini roof overtop the SkyBridge cleverly folds down with the arch.


IMG_20181119_101029

Looking at Port/Left side of what we call the “Wings” at the aft ends of the Pilot House, we can see those hinges being tacked together in the foreground and the 15mm/5/8” base plate for the two compression posts for the Arch tacked into the far inside corner of the Wing box.  Those two large 100mm/4” diameter holes on the top of the Wing Box are where the two compression posts will soon be fitted.


IMG_20181120_120718Like this. 

The Arch itself is being built off the boat as we’ve seen in previous posts and we’ll show you more of that once it has been tacked together and gets fitted to the top sides of those big hinges.
IMG_20181120_120754

If you look back at the rendering above you will see how the thick 30mm/1 1/4” window glass wrapped around all sides of the Pilot House extends back to the ends of these Wing Boxes so you can imagine how well protected this aft end of the Pilot House and Aft Deck will be. 

This will be especially appreciated when you are going in/out of the SuperSalon through that door you see here on the left or up the circular stairs to the SkyBridge on the opposite side.

IMG_20181120_120953Meanwhile up front in our Maser Cabin the last of the water tanks are getting their baffles put in and their tops welded on.


IMG_20181120_121028Here is a closer shot to show the baffle plate and top flat bar welded in place and you can see what the completed matching tank looks like on the left.  These tanks will be used more as ballast than for potable water for us to use for dishes and showers. With our eXtremely large volume of diesel fuel we carry in our central tanks, 14,500L/3800 USG, that as this volume and weight go down during a passage we are able to maintain the same overall displacement and balance of the boat by adding the equivalent amount of water in the tanks on either ends. 


Our ability to move water, and fuel, from any one tank to any other also gives us tremendous options for adjusting the ride and balance of the boat as sea and weather conditions change during a passage.  Safety, Comfort and Efficiency are our top 3 priorities and this helps us with all three and this is a good example of how we have made the thousands of design decisions for these eXtreme eXpedition Passage Makers or XPMs.


IMG_20181119_160711Down on the shop floor the work continued on the big hatch for the Engine Room.  Framing is now all tacked in place and you can now clearly see the open channel that surrounds the entire outer perimeter is formed.
IMG_20181119_160745This will in turn match up with an opposite U shaped channel surround the perimeter of the opening on the Aft Deck to create a very well sealed connection between them. 

The matching U shaped channel on the Aft Deck will also create a perfect gutter to catch any water on the outside of the door and make it easy to put in some drains out the bottom of the channel so that when you open this big ER hatch no water ever drips inside and keeps any water from sea or sky on the outside where we like it.

DSC_0534

What do you think these two onlookers are looking at??
IMG_20181121_110939Could it be watching our Master Welder Sezgin pushing one of the many MIG welders outside?


IMG_20181121_111054Or are they checking out how most of the other equipment and aluminium parts have been removed from around and under Möbius?
IMG_20181121_123814Or could they be wondering what that black Naval Yachts banner is hiding?

Or what are these Team Möbius members doing taking their tea break on this new blue bench that showed up?


DSC_0538Ohhhhhhh, now I get it, it is MOVE DAY!
DJI_20181121_134049Everyone pitches in to help get the blue boat mover into position.
DJI_20181121_134218Blocking and supports are carefully set in place.
DJI_20181121_134610Uğur and Umit quickly fabricate some additional braces to weld to the hull for more support.
DSC_0551Möbius steel floor supports are unceremoniously amputated with some quick passes of the Oxy-Acetylene torch.
DSC_0557This old white haired buy keeps getting in the way.
DSC_0544Then all these people show up…..
DSC_0561Deep within the dark shadows we hear the muted roar of a little diesel engine starting up and the whine of hydraulic motors as Möbius gracefully lifts off the floor …..
DSC_0565… and backs her beautiful aluminium butt out the door and into the sunshine.
DSC_0569aft deck now all clear
DSC_0570and now we see what that Naval banner was covering up!  Someone snuck in during the night to chisel out a bit more room for the upper heights of the SkyBridge to fit under!
DSC_0572All clear and fully out in the sunshine at last!
DSC_0576Backing all the way out and across the street and almost inside of the big Damen shipyard building next door.
DSC_0577Thanks to all those turnable wheels she makes the turn onto the street
DSC_0584Holds her beautiful big nose high in the air
DSC_0586Looking ever so huge and beautiful, she backs her beautiful butt down the street and off to her new home.
DSC_0615and a few minutes later she gracefully makes the last turn towards her and Naval Yachts’ new home.

More of that same crowd showed up again to help mark this momentous occasion and you can click to enlarge to see if you can spot any faces you recognize?
IMG_20181121_154117Calmly waiting while they get the door to her new home open, Möbius sizes up that opening to make sure she will fit.
IMG_20181121_160421Doesn’t look like any chiseling of the door top will be needed here!
DSC_0624Half out ……..
DSC_0625…. half in.
DSC_0622Everything in life is relative and our big baby now looks more like a little girl as she backs into her cavernous new home.
IMG_20181121_172856Ahhhh, home at last!
DSC_0645Four VERY proud parents with their respective new “babies”:

Dincer on the left and Baris on the right, the two very proud parents of the new Naval Yachts shipyard they have just designed and built.

And Christine and I in between, proud parents of our beautiful little girl Möbius towering over all of us in the background with some of her many attendants all around.
IMG_20181121_171358Our poor little amputee has her legs reattached.
IMG_20181122_110027out goes the boat mover and in goes the stands
IMG_20181121_172833Feeling a wee bit little and lonely, Möbius now awaits her fellow shipmates to join her.
IMG_20181122_113929Next up is her slightly larger and much heavier sister “Legacy” who requires the slightly larger yellow boat mover.
IMG_20181122_114053Remote control all ready to
IMG_20181122_131322guide her around the first corner
IMG_20181122_162907around the last corner
IMG_20181122_165624Legacy points her nose into the same bay and heads for her awaiting buddy boat Möbius
IMG_20181123_095921And soon these two sisters of the sea are nuzzled nose to nose ready for their respective teams to resume work tomorrow.
As you can see it was a VERY “moving” week for all of us at Naval Yachts and now the work resumes on moving the rest of the company, a few more boats and getting back to work on completing these awemazing boats.

Sunset Nov 25-2018As one chapter ends and another begins, seems fitting that tonight would end with this beautiful sunset off our back balcony don’t you think?


I’ll admit to being a bit of a pooped pup after such a fabulous week so I’m going to let Miss Google look after creating the videos of you this time.  Frankly, I’m not sure I could do much better myself and that would take hours.

So here are the videos which Miss Google automagically created, one from my videos and one from Christine’s. 

These are also nice little examples of the very early uses of something I have an abundance of, Artificial Intelligence!  But seriously folks it is a fabulous time to be alive and an awemazing time to be living in so both Christine and I hope you will enjoy this post and these videos. 

Either way, let us know what you like and what you don’t like or would you suggest to make these blog posts more interesting and enjoyable.  Can’t guarantee I will be able to follow all your suggestions but I can guarantee that I’ll do my best to keep making them better each week.

– Wayne

Is it Live or is it Phantasmagoria?

Gardner + Aluminium = Goldilocks eXtreme eXploration Passage Maker

A quick post to refer you to a 2016 article in Yachting World magazine which Christine came across with an article about a fascinating fellow ex sailor now eXtreme eXploration passage maker David Cowper who recently completed one of the most challenging passages through the Northwest Passage.  Cowper, a Brit, has completed three circumnavigations by both sail and power and in 1990 was named Yachtsman of the year.  Quite rightly so I would say with feats such as being the fastest to sail single-handed around the world in both directions before he made the transition from sail to power in 1984.  Well worth the few minutes it will take you to read the full article.

 

David’s current boat mv Polar Bound is a custom designed pilot/lifeboat like 48 foot all aluminium with eXtremely thick plate up to 15mm with very close and heavy inner framework supporting it, is self righting, very heavily insulated, sealed collision bulkhead compartment up front, thick keel bar from stem to stern, huge integral fuel tanks below the waterline and stocked with spare parts for everything.

Sound familiar?

 

engine-hrAnd what powers this eXtreme eXploration power boat though ice and around the world?  A Gardner of course!!  In David’s case it is the 8 cylinder version of the same Gardner LXB family as will be powering have in Möbius.

 

Certainly not the boat or the life for most people but we certainly resonate with many aspects of it, though probably with a bit more time in tropical climates than David does.

But when it comes to boats we are in heated agreement with David that the combination of eXtremely thick and strongly framed aluminium powered by an eXtremely efficient and reliable Gardner is the just right Goldilocks combination for these kinds of eXtreme eXploration Passage Makers.

Congratulations David!  We follow humbly and proudly in your wake.