Ready for My Next Circumnavigation! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Jan 18-23, 2021

The start of our marine based circumnavigation of this awemazing planet of ours will have to wait for a few more months but yesterday (Saturday Jan 23, 2021) marked the completion of my 68th circumnavigation of the sun and I’ve already got my 69th off to a great start. 

I had a marvelous birthday yesterday by being able to do what I love most, build things with my hands, with the person I love most as well as receiving an overwhelming number of B’day best wishes from so many friends and family I am so fortunate to have in my life. 

IMG_1027Christine and I spent the day at Naval Yachts working on our Tender and were delighted to be able to fully install our Castoldi 224 DD jet drive and Yanmar 4JH4 TE 110HP diesel inboard engine which was another great milestone for us to hit and she is now well enough done for us to load onto the Aft Deck of Möbius before we Launch.  Just as we were finishing putting the Yanmar in place Dincer and Baris showed up with a  delicious strawberry B’day cake which was a delightful surprise and made my day all the more special.

Team Möbius also hit several other major milestones this past week so grab your favorite beverage and comfy chair and let’s jump right into this week’s Progress Update Show & Tell.

PAINT MY BOTTOM!

Perhaps the biggest milestone this past week was the start of putting on our “bottom paint” which is the only paint there will be on Möbius as all other aluminium surfaces are being left in their beautiful Silver “raw” aluminium state for minimal maintenance and the “all business” work/commercial/military esthetic we want for the exterior of XPM78-01 Möbius. 

However for the same low maintenance reasons, the situation is reversed for all the aluminium surfaces that are below the Waterline WL which will be painted with 5 coats of Epoxy Primers and then some top coasts of International InterSleek 1100SR which is a silicone based Foul Release type of Bottom Paint.

PXL_20210119_124135979.MPThe final bit of preparation of the hull was done by Nihat who finished up with what should be the final bit of aluminium welding when he welded on the threaded attachment discs for the ten zinc anodes that will be bolted onto the hull after it is all painted. 

These zinc discs are how we protect all the various dissimilar metals on Möbius which range from Stainless Steel, to Bronze to Aluminium and several others, from Galvanic Corrosion which is what occurs when two or more dissimilar metals are immersed in an electrolyte such as sea water.
Nobility Scale of metals chartReferred to as “sacrificial” anodes Zinc is one of the least “Noble” of metals and so it will ‘sacrifice’ itself by corroding first and thus protecting the other metals.  As these Zincs wear away with corrosion they are easy to replace with new ones.
PXL_20210119_130419311Zincs come in all shapes and sizes and we’ve decided to go with the more streamlined round disc shaped ones so Uğur quickly made up ten of these 80mm/” 3 diameter discs of 20mm / 3/4” thick AL and then welded them along the length of the hull.

This one will help protect the Rudder and its shaft.

BTW, the oval plate you see tacked in place near the leading edge of the Rudder is for the through hole in the Rudder which allows us to much more easily remove the prop shaft should that ever be neccessary by turning the Rudder hard over and letting the prop shaft slide through it so there is no need to remove the Rudder. 

The tacked on plates covering this hole on either side allow the paint crew can cover this with Epoxy filler and create a smooth sleek shape to the Rudder for maximum performance.
PXL_20210119_130429905Two more, one on either side, of the Keel and Prop Shaft Skeg and then six more matched pairs along the length of the hull up to just aft of the Bow Thruster tunnels at the Bow.
PXL_20210120_125348027First order of business for the Paint Crew was to fully “tent” the bottom of the hull with plastic sheets.  This is both to keep dust out from other work going on in the shipyard and keep in any overspray when they are spraying on the Bottom Paint.
PXL_20210120_152624200[4]The other reason for the tenting is to control the temperature and humidity of the hull which is done by this air heating system that is sealed onto the plastic tent sides. 
PXL_20210121_063125790We have been having a bit of a cold snap the past week here in Antalya with night time temps dipping down to 4C / 38F so we needed to bring the temperature of the AL hull up to < 15C / 60F for painting and filling.  Getting warmer, just a few more degrees to go.
PXL_20210120_125411366.MPPlastic all taped down to the concrete floors to seal everything in/out and it was paint time!
PXL_20210121_062957814.MPAzad, standing on the Left is Naval’s Master Painter and Ali on the Right and Mehmet kneeling on the Left round out our Paint Crew who where meeting here to go over the painting application process.
PXL_20210121_063050198You learn the hard way that it is not advisable to mix various different brands of paint so everything from the first coat of etching primer to the filler and the final InterSleek 100SR Topcoat is all from International Paints.  I have had excellent success with International paint on our previous boat so I wanted to continue to “go with what you know” for critical things like Bottom Paint.
PXL_20210121_073837599As you may recall, Ali and Mehmet had spent all last week sanding down all the AL hull surfaces to remove the AL oxide that naturally forms on raw AL and they gave it all a quick light sand, wiped it all down with acetone thinners and clean white rags and Möbius was ready to have her Bottom painted!


PXL_20210121_073904721.MPI prefer rolling on the primer rather than spraying as I think it improves the critical initial adhesion.  All the welds will be filled and sanded so as to create a completely smooth surface for minimal resistance when slithering through the sea.
PXL_20210121_134115496So these areas received the first coat of White InterPrime 820 which is a high performance, high build epoxy primer specifically formulated for underwater Al surfaces that will have epoxy filler applied on top.
PXL_20210121_133342699Once all the welds and other areas that will have Epoxy filter applied were covered in the White 820 primer, Ali & Mehmet rolled on the Bronze coloured InterPrime 450 which is optimized for maximum water barrier and long term anticorrosive protection.
PXL_20210122_063845340.MPAnd in just a few hours they had all the AL underwater surfaces fully covered with their first coat of Epoxy primer.
PXL_20210122_063652343Once they had all the AL covered with the initial coat of Epoxy primers, they could start mixing up the epoxy filler and smooth that onto all the welds to create smooth hydrodynamic surfaces for the water to flow over.
PXL_20210122_063818359Mehmet and Ali have painted and filled a LOT of boats so they are eXtremely fast and efficient at applying this first coat of filler.
PXL_20210122_114739532.MPThis first coat provides the majority of the filler needed to smooth out all the welds and then after it is fully hardened they will take their long boards and orbital sanders to smooth out all the surfaces and add any more filler needed to make each surface perfectly smooth. Having smooth flat and curved surfaces not only makes the hull much more slippery, it also makes it easiest for us to clean when we dive the boat every few months to wipe off any growth that has formed from sitting at anchor for long periods.
PXL_20210122_115011685In this photo we can see two good examples of this such as the exit from the Bow Thruster tunnel and the nicely coved welds between the thick Keel Bar and the hull plates on the very bottom.
PXL_20210122_114603575Clean water flow over the CPP propeller and the Rudder are two other eXtremely important areas so all the welds and transitions receive a good coating of filler so they can be sanded into smooth gentle curves for the final paint to go on top.

Be sure to join us here next week when the sanding, filling and primer continues.

EMERGENCY TILLER

PXL_20210118_134115041With their work done outside the boat, Nihat and Uğur moved inside to build and install the Emergency Tiller.  This is another one of those bits of kit that we hope never to use but are always glad to have just in case.
PXL_20210118_151755877[3]I designed the whole Tiller Arm to be eXtremely simple and eXtremely robust so you can see how the Tiller Arm itself has been machined from a single solid block of aluminium which clamps around the 127mm / 5” OD AL Rudder Shaft.  We extended the top of the Rudder Shaft up above the Tiller Arm and milled a large 80mm / 3” hole in it for a 2.3m / 7.5ft thick walled AL pipe to slide into.
PXL_20210118_134143252To help support this Emergency Tiller pipe, Uğur is bolting this 20mm / 3/4” thick AL plate to the front wings of the Tiller Arm
PXL_20210118_134124497.MPThis provides plenty of leverage to the Emergency Tiller pipe so it can provide more than enough power to turn and hole the Rudder in position in even the most demanding of rough water conditions.
PXL_20210121_080012586.MPAlmost finished here, just need to put some holes in those two AL tabs on the front of the Tiller pipe so that we can fasten two Dyneema block and tackle setups between the end of the Tiller and the side frames of the hull to keep the Rudder in whatever position needed and to be able to steer the boat smoothly by letting one block out and pulling the other in.


We will test it out on sea trials and then stow it hoping to never need to bring it out again, but it does help us SWAN or Sleep Well At Night knowing it is there.

Mr. Gee puts his Jackets On

PXL_20210115_101831712Mr. Gee got some attention this past week as well when I found the time to install all of the insulation jackets covering all the SS dry stack pipes of his Halyard exhaust system.  This is what his dry stack looks like when it is “naked” and with the aft two of the support braces installed.
PXL_20210120_093831798And this is what it looks like as I started dressing him up with his class Gray insulation jackets.

As they did with the whole exhaust system, Oliver and his talented team at Halyard in the UK did a fabulous job building this set of jackets that wrap the entire dry stack portion of the eXhaust to keep the heat out of the Engine Room until it has the sea water injected into it and cool everything down as it enters that large White Silencer/Water Separator just visible on the far upper Left.
PXL_20210120_093855284

This is a stack of the little mini jackets that wrap around each connection joint of the three main jackets and ensure that no heat escapes out these joints.


PXL_20210120_093905549The bulk of the insulation value comes from that White fluffy material you can see running the length of these inside surfaces and with a thin SS mesh sewn in to keep it all in place.  Then thick canvas like material is sewn into each end of each jacket so that each joint is very tight and no air can flow in or out.
PXL_20210120_093900463The outer jacket material is very soft and supple to your hand yet fully fireproof and adds another layer of insulation.  Cords are sewn into packets along both outer edges so that you can cinch each jacket up tight where it wraps around the jacket underneath.

Double D-Rings on the center straps make it easy to wrap the jacket around the pipe and cinch them down tightly around the circumference of each pipe and pull the straps tight.
PXL_20210120_093835573I started by wrapping the first long vertical jacket on the far Right here followed by the second short curved jacket that butts up to the vertical one around the elbow to make the transition to the long  horizontal jacket I have partly fastened in place here.

PXL_20210120_095826832With all three of the longer jackets all strapped down I now wrap one of these narrower jackets around each joint where the inner jackets meet to fully seal in all those joints.  You can see the first narrow jacket fully cinched down around the end of the vertical jacket and the bottom of the elbow and I’m about to wrap the next one around the joint between the horizontal jacket and the elbow jacket.
PXL_20210120_101404656Very much a KISSS Keep It Simple Safe & Smart system which I am very pleased with.  Keeps most of the heat inside the exhaust system and out of the Engine Room, Safe to be around such hot components with little danger of grabbing or falling against such eXtremely hot parts and easy to remove to check or do maintenance.  Well done Halyard!

CPP PITCH GAUGE SENDER

PXL_20210121_075122831Hilmi also spent some time in the ER this past week installing this bronze Kobelt Pitch sensor on the Nogva CPP Gearbox. 
PXL_20210121_075131689Very similar to a Rudder angle sensor, the Bronze arm with the spacers taped onto will be connected to the lever on the Nogva that changes the Pitch of the CPP prop blades.  This data is then sent out that Black cable and up to the CPP Pitch gauges at each Helm station as well as being put onto the boat data network that we can view on any screen from our phones and tablets up to the big boat monitors.

HOUSE BATTERY BANKS FINISHED

PXL_20210119_091445078Hilmi and I also spent some time in the Basement and were able to finish the four House Battery Banks under the floors down there.  Each bank consists of four FireFly Carbon Foam 4V @ 450Ah batteries wired in Series to create a 24V @ 450Ah bank.  Each of these four banks are wired directly into the main DC High Amperage Distribution Panel above them.

The bottom six 4V batteries are Bank #1 located in the Aft most battery compartment which is under the floor and goes down to the very bottom of the hull along each side of the 25mm thick Keel Bar that runs the length of the boat.  Each compartment is sealed in with 6mm AL floor plates and rubber gaskets.
PXL_20210119_123234307Starting to tidy up all the wiring in Bank #2 at the bottom and #3 on top.  Red/Black cables are the positive and negative cables each 250mm2 which is about 4/0 AWG size to ensure that we have no less than 2% voltage drop in any of these cables. 

The Gray wires connect a variety of temperature sensors to each battery bank so we can monitor the temperature of each individual bank as well as the ambient temperature of the Battery Compartments which are vented in/out with thermostatically controlled fans.  The temperature data is not only for our eyes but is also fed directly to the Victron BMV 712C Smart Shunt battery monitors which is in turn used to set the charging rates from any of the five MultiPlus Inverter/Chargers so that their battery charging is fully optimized.
PXL_20210118_150806942Last to be worked on Bank #4 we are about to connect up the large cables and sensors gives you a less obscured view of the thick Copper positive cable take off with the T-Class fuse that the cable bolts to and the Victron battery temperature sensor under the bolt to the positive terminal of the battery.
PXL_20210120_064626560Back up in Banks @ & 3 the cables are all now fully secured with zip ties and you can see the simple battery hold down system we came up with by cutting those shaped blocks of composite foam that wedge each battery firmly in place when the gasketed lid is bolted down.
PXL_20210120_064921315After one last check of the BMV battery monitors and double checked all the connections, the penetration in the top center section atop all the battery compartments could be filled with special fireproof filler to fully seal the compartments and firmly hold each wire and cable in place.
PXL_20210120_064939545Stepping back a bit to show you the lid being bolted down over Banks #2 & 3 and that now sealed penetration with all the big Red/Black cables coming out of the Battery Compartments and directly into the High Amp DC Distribution box on the upper Left.  One of two 120V MultiPlus Inverter/Chargers seen on the Right, three more 240V MultiPlus’ are on the opposite side. 

Möbius is now all powered up which is yet another big milestone for us.

SHOWER TEAK FLOORS ARE IN

PXL_20210119_123608903Orkan and Ali finished building the three sections of Teak flooring for both Showers and moved them onto the boat this past week.

This is the Shower in the Guest Cabin showing off its beautiful new Teak floor.  If you look closely (click to enlarge any photo) you can see how the edges are relieved with a 15mm/5/8” gap away from the walls which is here the water falls down to the shower pan below and then out the drain into the Grey Water tanks.

Each floor section is removable for cleaning and maintenance.
PXL_20210119_123733551Same design up in the Master Head.
PXL_20210119_123727438With a second floor panel in the connected Shower.
PXL_20210119_123744098.MPAll coming together very nicely if I do say so myself and the combination of materials and colours are very pleasing to our eyes and seem to be able to keep up with those artfully etched glass walls.
PXL_20210119_124234444.MPLast bit of Teak is the permanently affixed panel that goes on top of the seat in the Master Shower to help keep you from slipping when sitting so Ali got right to work at that.
PXL_20210122_103047665Ali and Orkan do all the Teak deck work at Naval so they too have LOTS of practice and make this all happen very quickly.

SUPERSALON SUPERING ALONG

PXL_20210118_095026297.MPUp in the SuperSalon, Nihat and Uğur finished mounting the Llebroc Main Helm Chair to the now finished Ado LVT vinyl floor.
PXL_20210118_095031772In eXtreme sea conditions the forces on these pedestal bases can be high in the eXtreme so they are bolted through 60mm / 2.5” thick solid laminated blocking under the flooring and thru the Aluminium floors into 15mm thick AL reinforcement plates in the ceiling of the Basement.
PXL_20210118_095424666I took this shot while briefly sitting in the fully mounted Helm Chair with the camera lens held at eye height to give you an idea of the view forward from the Main Helm.  It is a bit cluttered up there on the Bow right now as Christine is finishing off all the Dyneema lifelines and Uğur is putting in the Dorade Cowls, but you can still see how much visibility we have when conning the boat from this Main Helm Station.
PXL_20210122_113511880.MPAnd here is one of the silicone cowls on the four Dorade boxes on the front deck.  These ensure that we always have plenty of fresh air circulating in our Master Cabin even in rough breaking seas when we would not be able to have the hatches open.  Ventilation on an XMP type of boat is critical for two of our four priorities; Comfort and Safety.

Each White/Red silicone cowl can also be rotated 360 degrees by just loosening that notched Gray ring at the base and then tightening it back down.  Any water that gets into the cowl simply flows out those slots in the bottom of the AL Dorade Box and none can get down the 100mm / 4” AL vent pipes going down into the Master Cabin.
PXL_20210121_121311891Uğur and I worked together to install the locking latches in the large hinged hatch in the SuperSalon that gives you access to the Basement below.  Ramazon had finished laying down all the LVT vinyl flooring so we could now cut out the recesses for the two SS locking latches for lifting up and locking down this big hatch.

We were running a bit short handed so we had to call in this foreign help and he worked out so-so.
PXL_20210121_121245282I just love my little Milwaukee 18V router and it made short work of routing out the recesses in the vinyl flooring and underlying plywood for the SS latches to fit into and be flush with the flooring.
PXL_20210121_131732612It was a bit tricky as the recesses needed to be multiple depths for the different steps in the base of the SS latches as you can see here.

PXL_20210121_121336811We cut out little cardboard temples you can see in these photos and used them mark out the floor and then I could carefully sneak the router up to those lines.
PXL_20210121_153147374On the underside of the Hatch these SS levers turn to engage into slots on the frame and ensure that the hatch stays fully closed and could not fly open if we were to ever roll over.

TENDER is READY to GO ONBOARD Möbius

Tender JetDrive 009 overall renderAs I mentioned in the intro, Christine and I spent the day yesterday (Saturday Jan 23, 2021) at the shipyard as we wanted to get the Tender ready to be loaded onto the Aft Deck of Möbius just before the boat mover takes Möbius over to be launched.  Uğur and Nihat had finished the hull last month and now we needed to get the jet drive installed and the Yanmar engine in place before lifting the Tender onto the Aft Deck.
PXL_20210120_090918541Earlier in the week the Fenders we had ordered over a month ago showed up and are great to have so we can install them soon.  It took a lot of searching but we finally found a Turkish company making these very industrial grade rubber fenders for bit Pilot Boats, Tugs and docks which were just what we were looking for.
PXL_20210120_090935298

If you look closely in the rendering above you can see how we have designed these fenders to wrap all around the upper edge of the hull which will enable us to easily rub up against rough docks and concrete walls as well as use the Tender as we intend to as a “tug” for moving Möbius around or helping out other boats.

Not sure when I will have time to install these but I’ll show you when it does happen.

I will likely install a row of these on the stern of Möbius as well so we would be able to similarly push up against a rough concrete wall with no damage or concerns.
PXL_20210123_070558758.MPWe started by disassembling my hydraulic hoist up in my workshop at Naval and moved it down to the shipyard so we could use it to lift our Castoldi 224 DD jet drive and Yanmar 4JH4 TE 110HP diesel inboard engine into the Tender.
PXL_20210123_074448362.MPI designed the hinged lid on top of the Engine Bay in the Tender so it would go well over center when fully raised but we tied it on just to be safe as we had to lift the Tender up quite a bit to be able to get the jet drive in from underneath.
PXL_20210123_073401198.MPAlways great to have a fully rigid and solid aluminium boat hull and so it was a piece of cake to wrap a length of webbing around the Swim Platform and attach the end of the hoist to this to life the whole aft end of the Tender off the floor.  This hoist is just SO handy to have and I’ll be taking it with us when we go as it all comes apart and stores very small.
PXL_20210123_074502482Equally handy and coming with us are these jack stands which I’ve had for probably 30+ years and worked just fine to prop the Tender up above the floor so we could slide the Castoldi jet drive home from underneath.
PXL_20210123_074510665We had done a dry fit of the Jet Drive into the Tender when we were building the hull and then stored it, upside down here, it the wood crate it had been shipped in.  Now it was time to flip him over and get him permanently installed and sealed into the hull.
PXL_20210123_075956966.MP”Are you SURE you know what you’re doing?!” asked the Captain which is not a new phrase from her as you might imagine. 

Yet another super handy tool is my little car floor jack and it worked well to balance the Jet Drive on and then jack up into the Castoldi supplied AL frame that had been welded into the bottom of the hull.
PXL_20210123_083330903We first did one last dry fit just to make doubly sure that all the holes I had drilled in the thick transom plate and the bottom flange in the hull and then lowered it back down to clean all the mating surfaces with Acetone.
IMG_1016Then squeezed on a good bead of Sikaflex 291i structural adhesive on all the mating surfaces.
PXL_20210123_111833222.MPThen slide it home one last time and insert the SS bolts
PXL_20210123_111857599and torque them all down.
PXL_20210123_111840814.MPWith the Jet Drive now all bolted in place we could now install the two cylinders on either side.  Port/Left side is the cylinder that moves the jet nozzle and steers the boat. 
PXL_20210123_112235760Starboard/Right cylinder moves this bucket that sits overtop of the flow of water coming out of the jet and redirects in whatever direction you wish to go forward, reverse or sideways.
PXL_20210123_112250009The whole installation went very smoothly and the Jet Drive was now fully in place.
PXL_20210123_112347184.MPNext up………….. unboxing and installing our four cylinder Yanmar 4JH4 TE 110HP diesel inboard engine that has never even been out of the box he shipped in.
PXL_20210123_112358314After some initial concerns that the motor in our Tender would be three times more powerful than the Yanmar in her last 33’ Caliber sailboat, the Captain seems to be warming to the driving force in our Tender.
IMG_1023It took some work to find the model I wanted which s this one with all direct mechanical fuel injection rather than ECU controlled common rail but thanks to the super helpful Yanmar dealer at Denpar Marine here, this is just what I wanted.
PXL_20210123_114414439.MPI have used this same hoist to lift all of Mr. Gee’s 1200Kg / 2650 lbs many times during his full factory rebuild so lifting the mere 217Kg/ 478lb Yanmar was a piece of cake.
PXL_20210123_121226198.MPWe rolled the Yanmar around to the Stbd side and then under the hull and it dropped right onto the 25mm / 1” thick AL engine beds welded into the hull. 


PXL_20210123_121515084The Yanmar has landed!

With so many other priorities on our plates this will be good enough for now to just have the Yanmar sitting on the Engine Beds and I’ll get back to bolting the motor mounts in properly later. 

This engine and jet drive are a matched pair that Castoldi put together so it came as a very complete system that I am very pleased with.

This is a Direct Drive jet drive so there is a short cardon shaft (drive shaft) that connects the output shaft from the Yanmar to the input of the Castoldi which makes alignment and connection all very simple and this is all work that I can do after we launch and have the Tender on the Aft Deck of Möbius.
PXL_20210123_121559076But for now, this closes the door on our Tender and she is now all ready for the crane to lift it onto the Aft Deck of Möbius just before the boat mover shows up to carry Möbius over to the harbour and LAUNCH!!!

Can’t let myself be distracted by that excitement yet as there is still SO MUCH to do before she is ready to launch but there is definitely light at the end of this looooooong and winding tunnel!


So do stay tuned for the big finale folks, it IS getting closer and closer and we would be delighted to take you along with us over the finish line!  I’m sure that many of you are feeling like this journey would never end and we sincerely thank you for sticking with us and for all your contributions of questions and suggestions that have been so helpful along the way and PLEASE do keep them coming by typing them into the “Join the Discussion” box below and I look forward to seeing you here again next week.

-Wayne





Mr. Gee is Cagey & Exhausting Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius Jan 11-15, 2021

Another busy week for Team Möbius as we all focus on getting her finished and ready for her Splash Day first kiss with the sea, which we are now counting in weeks rather than months or years, so exciting times here at Naval Yachts to be sure.  As is often the case near the end of an eXtremely big project and certainly at the end of Project Goldilocks, most of the work is on all those “small jobs” chasing down all the loose ends from previous work installing all the systems, cabinetry, propulsion, etc.  And as most of you would know from your work on projects it is the last 5% of a job that seems to often take 50% of the time!  However, good progress is being made and I will take you on a whirlwind tour through all the little things that got done this week which add up to be an eXtremely BIG deal as it gets us another week closer to Launch Date.

So strap yourself in and hang on for this week’s Show & Tell tour of the Good Ship Möbius for the week that was January 11-15, 2021.

HELMS:

Llebroc Upper Helm ChairYou may recall from reading previous posts that we have been very busy finishing off lots of those “little jobs” to complete the Upper and Lower Helm Stations and that continued this week. 

This is the Llebroc Tradewinds CX High Back helm chair that will be our perch when piloting Möbius from the Upper SkyBridge Helm and Nihat and Uğur got that all mounted and through bolted this past week.
PXL_20210111_133056567We needed to wait until the TreadMaster had all be glued down to all the aluminium floors in the SkyBridge and then we could mark out the exact location of the 6 through bolts for the base of the pedestal.
PXL_20210111_152910361.MPDirectly below this Upper Helm Chair base is this area above the Galley so Nihat removed the 50mm/2”  EPDM insulation foam to expose the area where the supporting plates and through bolts would go.


FastMount standard ClipThis is a good example of why all the panels on the ceilings and many on the walls are made to be easily removable by using FastMount clips which are the White dots you can clearly see against the Black ceiling framing in the photo above.  Being able to remove any panel in a few seconds is an eXtreme time saver for such jobs.
PXL_20210111_152902953There can be a tremendous amount of force exerted on that base when a good sized adult is perched way up on top of the Helm Chair in rough seas so Nihat & Uğur installed some 20mm AL plate on the underside of the AL floor plates and then ran the through bolts from the pedestal base to sandwich the whole assembly and create an eXtremely solid pedestal for this Upper Helm Chair.
PXL_20210111_152922589.MPAs is so often the case with these “little” jobs, all the time and work is in the preparation and the actual installation goes very quickly.  So once they had all the prep work done with the support plates and drilling the holes it didn’t take them long to torque down these six 316SS C’sunk bolts and the Upper Helm Pedestal was all done and ready for the adjustable base plate and slider of the chair to fit over the top of the AL piston you see here.  This piston has a powerful gas lift cylinder inside that makes it easy to raise/lower the Helm Chair about 30cm/12”.
PXL_20210111_133149816In front of the Upper Helm Chair, this custom made Switch Panel for all our external lights finally arrived and fit like a glove in the opening below the Standard Horizon GX600 VHF-AIS.
PXL_20210111_102538061Hilmi had already installed all the wires so it did not take him long to get all these switches wired up.  We tested out all the lights and everything worked just as planned.
PXL_20210111_064947231Such as these Green Navigation Lights that Hilmi is checking out here on the Starboard/Right side of the SkyBridge coaming.
PXL_20210111_065005679Red Nav Light on the Port side working just as well.

BTW, a fun way to remember the Red/Green orientation is “There’s no Red Port Left”  (thanks for the correction Max!)

TreadMaster on these side decks is all ready to be glued down which they also completed this past week.

PXL_20210111_133120077Christine and I installed the two 24” touch monitors as you saw last week and there are a few more “little jobs” need to be looked after but this Upper Helm Station is nearing completion now which has been great to see.
PXL_20210111_133406608Similar story down below at the Main Helm where we also installed the two 19” touch monitors last week and this Helm is now also getting close to finished.
PXL_20201123_080219974.MPThis is the Llebroc Bandera Series 2 Helm Chair which, similar to the Upper Helm Chair, needs to have its pedestal mounted and through bolted in the floor.
PXL_20210112_093059795We needed to wait until Ramazan had finished installing all the Ado LVT vinyl flooring and then layout the location of the solid block floor that had been installed here for the through bolts to go through the 50mm/2” thick insulated and heated floor. 

Drilling and installing these through bolts is a bit tricky due to all the cable trays filled with electrical cables running underneath this floor in the Basement, but we lowered the cable trays and drilled all the holes with no problem after lots of careful measurement.

This is where we left off on Friday so Uğur and Nihat will pick up here when we all get to work Monday morning.
PXL_20210112_093041739Just behind the Main Helm Chair we had to do the same kind of layout and prep for through bolting this Zwaardvis Triton Deluxe adjustable pedestal for the Dinette Table.
PXL_20210112_093055787In addition to the Up/Down adjustment of the pedestal itself you can see here how the Zwaardvis T-System XY slider bolts on top and allows us to move the table fore/aft and left/right by 200mm/8” which enables us to put the Rosewood table in the Goldilocks just right position for eating/working, lounging of made down into a bed.  The little Black unit on top will be fastened to the underside of the table and you just pull that Black lever and the cable releases the “brake” while you slide the table in the XY axis you want and then release to lock the table in place. 

Very KISSS – Keep It Simple Smart & Safe!
PXL_20210111_153157483.MPBy Friday Faruk, Orkan and Ali had finished up the remaining “little jobs” with the TreadMaster non-slip surfaces.  Both Side Decks and the front platform in front of the hinged Solar Panel bank is now all completed.
PXL_20210111_153121429.MPAs is this small area around the Lewmar EST65 Warping/Kedging winch.

OTHER ELECTRICAL JOBS

PXL_20210111_153126683Our head Sparkie Hilmi had a busy week as well. 

He installed the Black Foot Switch for the Warping/Kedging winch above, so one more little job checked off the punch list.
PXL_20210111_102527822Finished wiring up all the components in the Upper Helm Station.  Kobelt WalkAbout remote control box in the upper Left corner, Nogva CPP clutch controls below it and Horn, Engine Stop & Start buttons on the bottom.

Std Horizon GX6000 VHF-AIS top center with the External Light Switch panel below which we saw earlier.
PXL_20210111_133142729.MPRight of the VHF is the Vetus Bow Thruster joystick and the Furuno NAVPilot 711C below it.  Maxwell anchor windlass control upper Right with Kobelt 7170 Jog Lever below.  Round gauge on far upper Right is the Pitch angle of the CPP propeller and hiding under the plastic is the Kobelt 6501 electronic control head for the Gardner Throttle and Nogva CPP Pitch adjustment levers.
PXL_20210113_111533388Looking through the WT door off the Aft Deck and peering into the dark space above as you walk through into the SuperSalon, you might be able to make out the neat little alcove up above that Hilmi and Christine worked on this past week.
PXL_20210113_111509509Here is a closer view with the upholstered panel removed to show the components installed in this well protected space.  Far Left is the Axis M7104 Video Encoder that puts our non IP cameras onto the network,
PXL_20210113_111516129In the middle is one of several Planet Industrial 10/100TX Ethernet switches and the incredible Kingdel i9 9th gen mini computer that Christine put together to be our Boat Computer #2.

HOUSE BATTERY BANKS

PXL_20210115_130946525Yesterday (Friday 15th) Hilmi and I spent some time down in the Basement working to finish off the installation of the 24 FireFly Carbon Foam batteries which make up our 1800Ah 24V House Battery.
PXL_20210115_131014986.MPHilmi has all 24 batteries wired up in their 6S4P configuration where six 4V batteries are wired in Series to create four 24V @ 450Ah banks which in turn are wired in Parallel to create a single 24V @ 1800Ah House Battery which gives us a total capacity of 45kWh to power all the AC and DC circuits onboard.  While we can safely take these Carbon Foam batteries down to 20$ SOC State of Charge, we will typically not take them below about 50% SOC so as to maximize their cycle lifespan and still give us up to 900Ah or 21.6kWh to keep us safely and fully powered up at all times.
PXL_20210115_132643694Before we look after the last step of organizing and supporting all the cables, Hilmi, Ramazan and I worked on this very KISSS way of holding each of the 24 4Volt cells in solidly in place under all conditions.  Each 4V cell/battery weighs 43kg/95lbs and by wedging each battery in place using these composite foam pieces you see in these photos.
PXL_20210115_132707875Right beside Möbius, Naval is building a big fancy 20m catamaran out of very high tech composite materials and this foam board was all left over “scraps” that caught my curiosity so I tested out some samples and this stuff is awemazing! 

It is literally light as a feather and I can beat it with a sledge hammer and not put a dent in it!  I’ve tried soaking it in water, vinegar and acetone with no absorption or other affects so I had an Aha! moment and thought this was the Goldilocks solution for a KISSS battery hold down system you see here.
PXL_20210115_132654215Along the sides, while difficult to see here, a two stepped piece of composite foam snuggly wedges in place between the sides of each pair of batteries and the aluminium tank sides and the thicker upper stepped part holds the batteries down by the ledge along the outer edge of each battery case.
PXL_20210115_132650957Down the middle a T shaped piece of composite foam is wedged into the 40mm/1.6” air gap where the sides of the batteries meet.  If you look closely (click to enlarge any photo) at the foam piece on the far Left, you can see how the T cut out fits on top of the ledge on the Blue plastic battery case.  When the AL plate lids are bolted on top this will squeeze the batteries tight against the AL floor down at the 25mm ‘’/ 1’ thick Keel Bar

I’ll be back next week to show you how we have organized and tied down all these big 25mm2 / 4/0 cables and then bolt on the 6mm AL cover plates with gaskets to seal the whole battery compartment which is then vented with thermostatically controlled fans to keep the batteries cool and well vented.

LIFELINES!

PXL_20210114_133143233Christine has been working onboard Möbius every day for the past few weeks now and took on one of the larger jobs remaining; installing all our Dyneema Lifelines.  I’m not sure if she is holding on out of pride of her work here on the Aft Deck or to help keep her tired little body upright after a grueling week.

We are using Dyneema for all our lines and rigging as it just SO superior to standard lines and Stainless Steel twisted wire being stronger, safer, kinder to the hands, easy to inspect and monitor.  Christine is going to do a separate blog post here with all the details so I will leave you to read that when it goes up in a few days.


Being as pleased and proud of her as I am though, can’t resist just a few photos of her handiwork to whet your appetite for more.


PXL_20210113_114221872Simple eye splice where each Lifeline begins with this “Luggage Tag” style attachment to the 40mm/1.6” thick walled AL stanchion posts.
PXL_20210114_133300285The top Lifeline is 90cm / 36” above the deck and the bottom one is a custom Goldilocks Just Right height to help keep our stubby legged Barney the Yorkshire Terror onboard.
PXL_20210113_114244534Where the Dyneema Lifelines simply pass through a Stanchion these short lengths of 10mm / 3/8” AL pipe have been welded at the height of each of the 3 Lifelines.
PXL_20210114_133209301For Lifelines that we need to remove regularly, she splices a Pelican Hook on the other end with a simple endless loop around the end gate stanchion pipe.
PXL_20210114_133228050Along the length of each Lifeline, to provide adjustment and re-tensioning over time, Christine has spliced on two Black aluminium “donuts” and then lashed between the two with smaller diameter Dyneema.  This one is just temporary while we are testing out the layout but will give you an idea how this system works.

SuperSalon is Floored!

PXL_20210111_064335000Ramazan has quickly become a Master at installing the Ado LVT vinyl flooring we are covering all the floors in all three living compartments on Möbius.  For orientation of this photo I am standing about where the Main Helm chair is looking Aft at the stairs leading up to the Aft Deck.  Ramazan has about half of the Ado LVT vinyl planks installed on the Right side in front of the two door style 130L Fridges in the back and 2 70 liter drawer freezers in the foreground.  The bare plywood rectangular piece on Ramazan’s Left is the hinged hatch that lifts up to access the stairs down into the Basement under the whole SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20210111_064306051.MPHere is what it looks like from the opposite end, standing in that WT door off the Aft Deck looking forward to the Main Helm at the front of the SuperSalon.  Galley is partially visible on the far Right.
PXL_20210113_111549426.MPA few hours later and that Basement Hatch is almost fully covered and Ramazan did a fabulous job having it blend in almost invisibly to the rest of the floor.
PXL_20210112_125857110Main Helm and Dinette Table floors all laid down and I’ve started to lay out the locations for the pedestal bases of the Helm Chair and the Dinette pedestals.
PXL_20210112_125852600Flooring all done in the Galley now.
PXL_20210114_124241646With the LVT flooring all done in the Master Cabin and the SuperSalon, Ramazan transferred his attention to the Corridor and Guest Cabin area which will likely the the most time consuming as there are 10 tank access ports he needs to lay the flooring around.

Here in the Corridor that connects the stairs up at the top of the photo coming down from the SuperSalon, to the WT door into the Workshop which is where I’m standing to take this photo.  He pulled up the temporary plywood covering that has been covering this area so he could level off the tops of the Blue rigid foam board for the final marine plywood to go on next.  Easy to see how PEX tubing for the In-Floor heating is snaking through the foam and the aluminium tape helps reflect the heat upward through the plywood.
PXL_20210115_105407266.MPPlywood is now screwed in place to the wood frames underneath and Ramazan has started to lay down the Ado LVT vinyl planks.

Stay tuned for next week’s episode where he will likely finish off all the vinyl flooring.

Mr. Gee gets Cagey!


Mr. Gee cage   exhaust support modelYou may recall from last week’s Progress Update that I had designed this pipe rail or cage setup attached to the four motor mounts I had designed months ago and work continued on this week.
PXL_20210105_132404350Here is where we left off last Weekly Update with the front and rear rails or “staples” that Uğur and Nihat had installed.
PXL_20210111_063820393On Monday, Uğur and Nihat finished off the “cage” by bolting on the two lengthwise tie rods to complete this very rigid cage around Mr. Gee.  As with so many elements on Möbius this serves multiple purposes, one is to provide a safety element when we are doing our hourly engine room checks on a passage and a sudden lurch in the boat’s movement might cause you to loose your balance and reach out to grab one of the hot or moving parts of Mr. Gee.  Now this “cage” provides you with a safe cool hand hold all the way around.


PXL_20210111_063824172.MPSecond purpose of this pipe cage is to provide the frame for the four support rods that need to go up to support the dry stack components of the Halyard exhaust system.  These four “ears” or tabs have been welded on to provide the lower attachment point for those four SS support rods.
PXL_20210114_134024345Cihan and Mesut fabricated four of these SS support rods in no time by welding some SS slugs into the end of each SS pipe and threading it for the Heim joints that would go in each end.
PXL_20210114_134033887I am just test fitting the Heim joints here so the SS lock nuts are not yet in place but you can see how this simple setup creates a Goldilocks support rod that is of course all very KISSS Keep it Simple Smart & Strong.
PXL_20210115_101831712Here is what it looked like as we shut down yesterday.  Next week Cihan will install the front two supports but already the exhaust dry stack is eXtremely solid and I can barely make it move when I grab it and shake it for all I’m worth.
PXL_20210114_150011125Two other important “little” jobs Cihan and I worked on this past week were the mounting of the Morse cables to the Nogva CPP Pitch lever and the throttle lever on Mr. Gee, and the solenoid for the shutoff lever on Mr. Gee. 

I whipped up this little sketch on my new favorite drawing board; cardboard!  No work of art and rather embarrassing for a former Draughting/Drafting instructor but it works well to outline my basic ideas and communicate them with Cihan with no problems given my poor Turkish language skills.


PXL_20210114_143123672I just love working with Cihan and everyone on Team Möbius because it is such a collaborative relationship.  I did that initial sketch you see above and discuss the key parameters with Cihan and ask him to run with it and build whatever he thinks will work best and is easiest for him to build.  This is the modified design he came up with and fabricated in minutes out of some 10mm / 3/8” aluminium plate.
PXL_20210115_101941176The purplish colored Morse cable on top here transfers the mechanical movement from the Kobelt electronic Actuator box up above on the ER wall down to thee throttle lever on Mr. Gee to change his RPM and then the 24V solenoid underneath moves the engine shut off lever below.

A similar Morse cable comes down from the other side of the Kobelt Actuator to move the Pitch control lever on the Nogva CPP Servo Reduction gearbox but I failed to get some photos of that.
PXL_20210115_101947000Her is a better angle of the finished result of the Throttle cable on top and the Shut off solenoid below. 

  • Two more jobs checked off the list!
    PXL_20210115_101923504Another prime example of how these “little” jobs take a BIG amount of time was finishing off this very busy area around Mr. Gee’s oil filter.  The bronze block on the Left has four fittings in it, the top one I’ve installed one of the two direct oil pressure gauges and then the Black line below it takes the pressurized oil directly to the valves in the cylinder head.  The bottom two outlets I have just plugged off for now but will soon have an oil pressure alarm sensor installed.
    PXL_20210115_101848653On the Right side of the big cast Oil Filter canister is the Black oil pressure adjustment valve and then that beautiful bronze oil temperature thermometer and a 2nd oil pressure gauge on the far Right.  The reason for two oil pressure gauges is that the one on the Right measures the oil pressure when it is highest coming directly out of the oil pump inside the crankcase whereas the one on the far Left measures the oil pressure at the far end of the line just before it gets pumped back into the crankcase.  This setup allows me to instantly see the difference from start to finish of the oil pressure to the engine and enables me to quickly spot any problem long before it advances.
  • There are also digital equivalents in the form of temperature and pressure sensors that will put this data onto our N2K network where I can log it by the minute and have a full history of all these metrics being logged every second of every day.


And that’s a wrap for the week of January 11-15, 2021 people!  Thanks so much for getting through yet another one of Wayne’s rambling Weekly Progress Updates and in spite of my pathetically long response time to them, PLEASE do add your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

I hope to see you again next week.

-Wayne

There will be NO Slip Sliding Away on Möbius! XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Progress Update Jan 4-8, 2021

And 2021 is off to rapid start as the first week of the year has already whipped by me in a flash.  Very busy times here as we all push to finish XPM78-01 Möbius and get her in the water by the new target Launch Date of February 12th!  Which BTW, is now only 33 calendar days and 25 working days from now.  Yikes!!

However, as we all learn over time, deadlines are good things to help us keep our eyes on the prize and get things done so as to ensure that there is no “Slip-Sliding Away” of our Launch Date!  Therefore, I am going to stick with using this fixed Launch Date to help keep the positive pressure on all of us on Team Möbius to “get ‘er done” and as my 4 year old granddaughter Blair says (with gusto!) “Let’s DO this!”

I’ll take that advise to heart with my introduction to this Weekly Progress Update and jump right into this week’s Show & Tell of what all happened aboard the Good Ship Möbius this past week of Jan 4-8, 2021

Non-Stick on the Bottom:


PXL_20210104_121016219

Continuing the very rewarding trend of late of hitting lots of different milestones of this build, work began this week on preparing the bottom of the hull for its foul release bottom paint.  First step was to clear out all the equipment and materials which had been accumulating underneath the hull on the shop floor.
PXL_20210104_121024683.MPIt helps to have a forklift of course so it didn’t take too long to move everything elsewhere at Naval Yachts and have a clear floor space under Möbius to work on.
PXL_20210105_064646565Next up was to get rid of the short little hull support posts and replace them with these longer steel tubes that connect just under the Rub Rails and slope down to the floor where they are secured into the concrete with long lag bolts.

You’ll note too that the upper part of the hull sides have now been covered in plastic to keep their freshly sanded surfaces clean.
PXL_20210104_111758312.MPThe two newest members of Team Möbius, Ali kneeling on the Right and Mehmet standing on the Left, get to work grinding down the welds below the waterline and removing the layer  of Aluminium Oxide Al2O3that has formed since these hull plates were first welded in place over two years ago. The automatic and rapid formation of Al2O3 is one of the big benefits of building hulls from Aluminium as it is a very had and durable protective layer that prevents any further oxidization or corrosion.  However Al2O3 is equally good at “protecting” the hull from paint, which is part of the reason why we are leaving all the exposed aluminium on Möbius unpainted. The one exception is below the waterline where we need to prevent marine growth from forming as this creates a lot of drag on the hull as it slides through the water.
PXL_20210105_072426269.MPSo you need to remove all the Al2O3 before the first coat of epoxy primer goes on.  This is the first round of removing the Al2O3 and then just before the first coat of primer is sprayed on, they will give it a light sanding with orbital sanders and a wipe down with Acetone to make sure the AL surfaces are completely clean and oxide free so the primer will bond well
PXL_20210105_074437093

The only item below the waterline that does not get painted is the big 1m OD beautiful Bronze Nogva CPP propeller, though later on, it too will get some special treatment to prevent fouling as even the slightest bit of grown or roughness on a propeller blade causes severe reduction in transferring power from the prop to the water.
PXL_20210105_074446979The special tube we cut through the Rudder can now be be filled in so Uğur tacked this elliptical AL plate to block off the hole for now.  Whenever we might need to pull out the prop shaft, this hole allows me to do so without having to remove the Rudder which can add a lot of time to the prop shaft Re & Re.  This will get covered with some epoxy filler and sanded flush with the surface of the Rudder plates as a super slippery Rudder also helps a lot to increase the efficiency of the Rudder and Steering overall.
PXL_20210104_132711290Another important part of the preparation for the bottom paint is taking off the upper edge of the “Boot Stripe” at the very top to make the transition from the bottom paint to the unpainted aluminium above.  This is made SO much easier now that we have laser levels to use rather than the laborious process of measuring every few feet as I’ve had to do in the past to establish what you hope is a level straight line.  In keeping with the “lean & mean” exterior esthetic, the Boot Stripe and the bottom paint will both be Black but the Boot Stripe will be glossy Black Polyurethane whereas the Bottom Paint will be the matt finish of the silicone based International InterSleek 1100SR


For those not so familiar with bottom paints, most boats use an Anti-Fouling type of paint which prevents micro organisms from growing on it by having various biocide chemicals such as copper, tin and now more modern toxins which try to prevent growth from forming.  This has been done for centuries with many old wooden boats having their bottoms sheathed with sheets of thin copper.
PXL_20210104_132630120Looking nice and straight to me!

Anti-Foul type bottom paint doesn’t last too long, 6 months to 2 years max, before it either wears off or looses all its anti fouling chemicals and you have to haul out, remove all the old and paint on new coats which is neither quick nor inexpensive, to say nothing of the environmental concerns.
PXL_20210104_132658391.MPInstead of “Anti” foul we are going to use international InterSleek 1100SR which is a Foul RELEASE type of solution which in the simplest terms is a coating of silicone fluoropolymer which is akin to the non-stick coating such as Teflon on frying pans.  When I was a young boy I was struck by the idea of “Better Living Through Chemistry” and my daughter Lia is an Organic Chemist so this more modern and much more effective different kind of chemistry that creates Foul Release paint was a no-brainer for me.
PXL_20210104_132600948.MPA little kick up at the stern end of the bottom paint to add a bit of flair!

When moving, nothing sticks to the hull but when we sit at anchor for weeks or months at a time, grown will still form on our InterSleek bottom BUT it all comes off with a simple wipe with a cloth or sponge so the amount of time and effort it will take us to “dive the bottom” and clean the hull will be drastically reduced from our previous boats even though Möbius has a much larger bottom surface.
PXL_20210105_121710267[3]Uğur looked after one more bit of preparation for the bottom painting by sculpting the Exhaust Exit pipe which is not far above the waterline and below the top of the Black Boot Stripe so it too will be painted.

PXL_20210105_121658997I will talk more about the Foul Release and InterSleek1100 paint as we start applying it in the coming weeks, so to finish up for now let me just add that Foul Release type bottom paints and InterSleek are not well known by most boat owners but it has been the norm for large commercial and military ships since the 90’s.  Based on their experience the InterSleek1100 should last for around 5 to 7+  years, so we are eXtremely anxious to see how it performs for us on Möbius.  Stay tuned for the next couple of years to find out! Winking smile

Non-Slip up on Top:

PXL_20210107_073546864.MPJust as important as keeping our bottom Non-Stick to prevent growth, we need to keep all our decks and floors up on top to be very Non-Skid to prevent us from slipping when walking around, often in bare wet feet and a energetically moving boat.

For all our decks and other exterior AL surfaces we are using what we think is the ultimate Non-Slip material called TreadMaster which has the tag line “The Original Anti Slip Deck Covering” which has lasted for more than 20 years for many of our friends. 

In previous weekly updates you’ve seen the Team covering all the Main Decks and stairs with Treadmaster and this week the finished off the last remaining items such as these AL stairs from the Aft Deck down into the Workshop.
PXL_20210107_073556384We will leave all the “Slip Sliding Away” to Simon & Garfunkel while we stay put safe with our feel solidly in place on our TreadMaster and that composite grid flooring down in the Workshop and ER thanks very much!
PXL_20210108_142941793We left what could be the most dangerous or at least slip-prone deck for last; these narrow slopped Side Decks that flank the SkyBridge.  Orkan was able to use all the left over TreadMaster from doing the Main Decks to cut out all these smaller “tiles” of TreadMaster to cover these Side Decks and here he has them all cut out and flipped over upside down ready for the AL Side Decks to be sanded and cleaned.
PXL_20210108_151342777Faruk and Ali could now get busy mixing up the West Systems epoxy adhesive and gluing each piece of TreadMaster into its final positions on the Side Deck surfaces and squeezing out the epoxy to every edge with the HD roller you see here in the foreground.
PXL_20210104_150729359

And in the words of Jean-Louis, Voilà c’est fini!!

TreadMaster is now all done and one more milestone achieved.  Well done Team Möbius!!

Much ADO about Non-Slip Inside Too!

PXL_20201231_064414784Last week you may recall seeing Ramazan finish installing the ADO vinyl LVT flooring in the Master Cabin and he has that now all finished.
PXL_20201231_064536530Keeping ourselves safe at sea requires that ALL our floors are very Non-Slippery and as you can perhaps make out in this photo, we chose these Ado LVT vinyl floor planks in large part due to the highly textured nature they have that is similar to old well worn woodgrain on patio or pool decks.
PXL_20210105_153101626His final job to finish the Master Cabin was the two stairs leading up to the Port/Left side of the bed and the removable access lid beside the Shower.  These are the only vinyl flooring that is glued down, the rest is all “floating” so it can expand and contract in different temperatures.  Here is is using some very heavy weights to keep these pieces flat and squished onto the underlying marine plywood while the adhesive dries overnight.
PXL_20210107_074118757Master Cabin flooring all finished, Ramazan moved onward and upward to the SuperSalon and moved everything off the floors in there and gave all the plywood base a thorough vacuuming and cleanup.
PXL_20210106_105852531First task for the SuperSalon floor was to install the wood framing and rigid insulation on the large hinged hatch that provides access down into the cavernous Basement that lies below the AL floor of the whole SuperSalon.
PXL_20210107_074041873After checking that each plywood floor panel was solidly screwed down, Ramazan stared to do his layout for the floor planks.
PXL_20210107_074157941Starting with this reference line for laying down each row of planks perfectly parallel to the centerline of the boat.
PXL_20210107_113745764.MPClick – Click, assemble one row of planks.

Click – Click, lock that row into the previous one laid down.


PXL_20210108_143021368.MPRinse and Repeat, with lots of careful scribing and fitting around all the radiused Rosewood toe kicks surrounding all the cabinetry.

Screens, Screens and more Screens!


PXL_20210106_095311058Winding back the clock by a few days, another eXtremely big milestone for Christine and I happened this week and this photo should give plenty of clues as to what this was.

Can you guess what we are up to here?
PXL_20210106_095319924Hint.

It has something to do with these two unfilled spaces front and center at the Main Helm.
PXL_20210106_095328531That’s right!  Time to unbox and install all our beautiful big, sunlight readable, touch screen LiteMax helm monitors; two 19” here in the Main Helm and then two more 24” up on the SkyBridge Helm and then on each side of the Main Helm will be another 43” monitor on the Right and a 50” TV/Monitor on the Left.

After a LOT of research and some help from a fellow passage maker, Peter Hayden over on “Adventures of Tanglewood”  we finally tracked down the OEM manufacturer of most marine MFD’s and monitors and bought all five Helm monitors from LiteMax in New Taipei City, Taiwan. 
PXL_20210106_100430158The two 19” Main Helm monitors are LiteMax NavPixel Marine model NPD1968 and this link will give you all the technical details for those wishing to know more.  The specs that mattered most to us are that these are fully sunlight readable with 1600 nits (a good phone screen is about 300 nits), AOT touch, high shock & vibration resistance, IP65 waterproof and can be powered from 9-36V DC.
PXL_20210106_100538201Both monitors slide into this hinged plate above the Main Helm dashboard and allow us to tilt these monitors however we wish to have the best line of sight and least reflection.  Captain Christine is peeling off the protective plastic layer to check out the non-reflective screens below.
PXL_20210106_100646072Another feature we value highly is that these monitors have physical and easy to reach control knobs and buttons.  Always frustrating to try to figure out how to increase the brightness as daylight arrives and you’ve had the screens turned down close to black for night time viewing.
PXL_20210106_102735742Didn’t take us long to get the two 19” monitors mounted into the Main Helm and so we moved up to the SkyBridge where these two openings on the Upper Helm Station were begging to be filled.
PXL_20210106_111325846.MPFirst we removed the rear AL panel to give us access to the inside so we could tighten down the very well done mounting screw setup on these monitors.

We also put in a layer of thin EPDM foam rubber to fully seal each monitor into the AL Helm Station.
PXL_20210106_104706261.MPThey fit into their openings like a glove and as you can see the big opening we had designed into this AL Helm Station provided easy access all around each monitor to secure them tightly against each frame.
PXL_20210106_104713877These 24” monitors are LiteMax NavPixel model NPD2425 with similar specs as the one’s down below.  Plenty of connection port choices on the back including the power terminals on the far Left which will be connected to our 24V DC system and then via DVI-D to our onboard boat computers.
PXL_20210106_104643455As you might see reflected in the plastic protective covers, I took this shot with my camera at eye height when you are sitting in the SkyBridge Helm Chair so this will give you a good sense of the perspective you’ll have when conning the boat from up here with great visibility of the entire Bow and Anchor Deck up front.
IMG_0974When I wasn’t looking Captain Christine snapped this shot of me finishing up the installation under her watchful eye.

We are eXtremely excited to get these bad boys all powered up and connected to our boat computers but that will have to wait until next week so stay tuned for that.

POWER!

PXL_20210105_070759362Speaking of powering things up, whenever Mr. Gee is running we have up to 24kW of power from the two Electrodyne 250A @28V alternators he is spinning down in the Engine Room.  Here is a peek at the cabling that Hilmi completed this week which takes the AC output from the stator windings directly to the externally mounted Electrodyne Rectifiers over on the far Right side of the Workshop.
PXL_20210105_140040082.MPEach of these Electrodyne beautiful brutes has two individual alternators inside and so there are six cables coming out of each alternator to carry the 3 phase AC current.  So Hilmi  put his hydraulic lug press to good use crimping all 12 lugs onto each cable.
PXL_20210105_141320446That shot up above is of Big Red #2 which is driven by the PTO off the bottom Left of Mr. Gee which you can see a wee bit of in the very bottom Right of this photo.

On the Upper Left here, this is Big Red #1 which is mounted up above on this 40mm/ 1 5/8” AL plate I fabricated and bolted onto the pad on Mr. Gee’s cast aluminium crankcase just for this purpose.  This will be driven by a cogged “timing belt” setup which I am busy fabricating right now and I will show you more of next week.

Here though you can see the other six cables coming out of the Junction Box atop Big Red #1 on their way over and out of the ER to connect to the Rectifiers that are staying nice and cool out in the Workshop.

Mr. Gee Gets Cagey

Those with eXtremely sharp eyes and memory might notice a new addition to Mr. Gee this week?


Mr. Gee cage   exhaust support modelKeeping with our KISS or Keep It Simple Safe & Smart approach, I designed a dual purpose AL pipe “cage” to wrap around Mr. Gee to provide solid hand holds whenever you are near him while he’s running.  This then also creates the perfect base for the four support rods that go from the pipes of this cage up to the exhaust dry stack system up above which I will show you more of next week.

PXL_20210104_080045592I pulled off the 2D drawings from my Fusion 360 3D mode above, sent them over to Uğur on WhatsApp and he and Nihat got busy transforming these 2D drawings into 40mm AL pipe reality down on the shop floor.
PXL_20210104_080051729Same technique you’ve seen us use before, Uğur and Nihat create these large radius bends by cutting a series of slots on the inside of the curve in the 40mm thick wall AL pipe, bends them and then tacks them in place.
PXL_20210104_111702902.MPWe then test fit them in place on Mr. Gee and once tweaked into just the right fit Uğur welds the slots closed.
PXL_20210104_111706646As you might notice on the model rendering above, each “staple” shaped rail will be bolted to AL plates that span the motor mounts we fabricated here at Naval.
PXL_20210104_132736071.MP

Uğur could now weld on the 20mm / 3/4” thick base plates and weld all the bend slots closed.
PXL_20210105_064707202Nihat picks up with his angle grinder and quickly cleans up all the welds to create smooth soft curves.
PXL_20210105_132358340That gives Uğur time to go back into the ER and drill and tap all the threaded holes in the Engine Mount plates so the finished staples can be bolted in place.

Uğur and Nihat were only available Monday and Tuesday this week so this is where they left off and will pick up again tomorrow (Monday) morning to bolt in the longitudinal pipes and start fabricating the support rods that attach to the four AL tabs you can see they have now welded to the tops of each stable rails and will connect to the SS dry stack exhaust pipes you can see here.

We’ve Been Hosed!

PXL_20210104_081956996.MPOur eXtremely productive plumber Cihan was also with us for Monday and Tuesday and he made great progress plumbing in a lot of hoses and other items so let’s check that out.
PXL_20210104_081940739This is outside the Aft Stbd/Right corner of the Engine Room Enclosure with the plate removed that covers the far end where the prop shaft enters the ER and connects to the Nogva CPP Servo Reduction Gearbox via the Blue (purple looking here) dripless Tides Marine shaft seal. 
PXL_20210104_081947563.MPUp above and off to the far Right side of the prop shaft, you can just see the silver coloured AL heat exchanger with the bronze elbow which is what Cihan is now plumbing with this white hose.

This is the heat exchanger that cools down the fresh water/antifreeze mix that circulates through the inside of Mr. Gee and that is what this white hose carries to/from Mr. Gee and the heat exchanger.

If you look at the black composite end plate on this heat exchanger you can see that Cihan has already connected the hose that carries the cool sea water from the Sea Chest in the ER.
PXL_20210104_082003577Inside the ER on the Right side of Mr. Gee you can now see where two of the white sea hoses connect to Mr. Gee.  The top hose in this photo will carry fresh water coolant from the integrated water pump on Mr. Gee and the bottom hose carries sea water out of the long Bronze Engine Oil Heat Exchanger back to the Coolant Heat exchanger we saw in the  photos above.
PXL_20210105_131800135My apologies for not having time to draw up some better illustrations to explain how these heat exchangers all interconnect but for now this photo will show you two of the pumps in this system.  The round aluminium pump in the center of the photo above is the integral Garner centrifugal water pump which pumps fresh water/antifreeze coolant back from that silver AL heat exchanger we saw earlier.


PXL_20210105_131741168 The Bronze Jabsco pump on the Right is one that I am in the process of mounting and it is the impeller pump that pulls sea water from the ER Supply Sea Chest into the “IN” labelled port and then out of this pump into that bronze elbow with the Blue painters tape up above.  This sea water then runs the length of that Bronze Engine Oil Heat Exchanger bolted to the side of Mr. Gee and exits via the white hose you can see two photos up from here and goes down to that silver AL heat exchanger we saw at the beginning. 

The longer white hose in this photo carries Mr. Gee’s fresh coolant back to that silver AL Heat Exchanger.

Clear as mud to most of you and a pathetic job by this former mechanics teacher but best I can do for now folks.
PXL_20210105_071052003The other new addition this past week was Cihan’s installation of this Blue Beauty which is the big “sand” filter which removes most of the sea critters and debris from the salt water supply for the Delfin 200L/min watermaker.

This is not found in most boats and are normally used in large swimming pool installations, but I long ago discovered that these are the “secret” to extending the life of the other two sea water filters on the watermaker last for months rather than weeks.  This filter is filled with a special kind of sand known as Zeolite and it is the first line of defense to filter out the sea water being pumped out of the Sea Chest into the watermaker.
PXL_20210105_071100105There is a six way valve on top which you use to change between running the seat water through the filter and back flushing it in reverse once in a while to fully clean out all the debris that has been collected by the Zeolite sand.  Simple, easy and eXtremely effective.
PXL_20210105_071146113Super simple in design and to use and plumb with just three ports:  Top Right SS hose barb is where sea water is pumped into the filter by the low pressure high volume 24V pump connected to the Sea Chest.  Bottom Right is where the cleaned sea water exits and is pumped over to the two standard filters behind the watermaker.  Far Left with the SS elbow is where the dirty back flushed water exits and goes out the exiting sea chest in the ER.
PXL_20210105_144625975In the background on the wall behind the white watermaker housing on the bottom Right, you can see the three other WM filters; the pair on the Left are the Primary/Secondary sea water filters and the one off to the Right is a carbon filter to remove any harmful chemicals in the fresh water you use for back flushing the WM at the end of a run.
As usual of late I’ve got more photos to show you than I have time and dinner is once again waiting with my eXtremely patient and beautiful Bride on this Sunday evening so I’m going to call this a wrap for now and do my best to cover more next week.

Thanks for joining me on this first posting of 2021 and I hope it helps in some small way to get your new year off to a good start.  How about if YOU start your New Year off by adding your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below?  They are all true gifts to me and much appreciated!

See you next week.

-Wayne




Bye Bye 2020; Hello 2021 We are clearly floored! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Dec. 28-31, 2020

Though I continue to shake my head in disbelief,  it does indeed appear (on Jan 2nd as I write this)  that this tumultuous and challenging year that was 2020 is rapidly ending and 2021 just as rapidly beginning. Actually, it is now Jan 2nd as I am writing this so as usual, Wayne is way behind!

As with many of you I suspect, seeing the end of 2020 is somewhat welcome as we look to put most of the severely challenging aspects we experienced in 2020 behind us.  However being the “terminal optimist” I am, my observation would be that the end of 2020 is all the more welcomed with exponentially increasing trend lines of positive progress that is happening around us as 2020 winds down.  This progress is both in the most important and macro view of the truly awemazing progress that has been made with more and more effective vaccines and testing for Covid-19 as well as in my much more micro perspective of finishing and launching XPM78-01 Möbius.  I think most of you might agree that ending the year with positive progress rapidly rising is certainly a welcome change from when it was all going the other direction,

One of the words I would personally chose to describe 2020 is “accelerant”.  My brilliant and beautiful daughter Lia is a very successful chemist and one of the many things I learned through her is that, as Wikipedia words it

Accelerants are substances that can bond, mix or disturb another substance and cause an increase in the speed of a natural, or artificial chemical process. Accelerants play a major role in chemistry—most chemical reactions can be hastened with an accelerant.

My point here being that I think that as we put 2020 in the rear view mirror and perhaps provides us with the 20/20 or better “vision” that hindsight most often does, we will see that 2020 was very much an accelerant for trends that were already happening prior to the beginning of 2020 and increased the speed and rate of change of these trends which were BOTH, positive and negative.While making sure to attention to and learn from those negative trends  I chose to focus on the positive trends which have been equally or great accelerated by the events of 2020 and which I will try to further in 2021 and beyond. 

Very selfishly, those trends include the accelerated rate at which Christine and I hope to finish the building of Möbius and start a whole new trend which we can also accelerate, that of returning to our life at sea as full time liveaboards as we pick up where we left of in “wandering, pondering and wondering the world one nautical smile at a time.”  You can be the judge of how well we do at this if you chose to continue to follow our adventures here on the Möbius.World blog as we make the transition from building to cruising.  Wish us luck, we’re going to need it!

OK, after yet another “brevity challenged” opening, let’s get to what you really came here for;  this week’s Progress Update Show & Tell for the 3.5 day week of December 28-31, 2020.  New Years is a VERY big deal here in Turkey and so everyone on Team Möbius and Naval Yachts was very anxious to finish up at 13:00 on Thursday and get the New Years festivities started.  It all worked out very well on the calendar as well as this gave all of us a 3.5 day weekend to celebrate the end of 2020 and ring in 2021.  As in many parts of the world there was no shortage of fireworks for Christine and I to enjoy from our 9th story apartment here in Antalya as we toasted this dual closing and opening of windows in our world.  We hope that however and wherever you were for New Year’s Eve 2020 that you too were able to celebrate this annual transition and that 2021 will turn out to be one of if not the best year we have ever had.

Why is Wayne Floored?

PXL_20201230_064314702Two very good reasons this last week of 2020 has me so floored and this is the first; Uğur and Nihat installed the grated floors in the Engine Room surrounding Mr. Gee!  This is the same very cool composite floor grating that you’ve seen us installing for the floors in the Forepeak and the Workshop.  eXtremely rigid, impervious to all chemicals, easy see-through to the bilge spaces below, easy to install and lift out when needed.
PXL_20201228_152119866Very simple aluminium L-bar framing to support these floor grates which Nihat and Uğur have perfected now and weld up in a jiffy.  This is the frame for the raised floor at the Aft end of the ER.
PXL_20201228_092247916.MPBy raising the floor here about  200mm/8” above the two side level floors flanking Mr. Gee, we were able to make this all one level floor across the whole width of the ER.
PXL_20201228_141405395In addition to the Safety factor when moving about in the ER during our hourly ER checks on passages and when I’m working in there, the grating also protects the hoses, solenoids, dipstick, etc. on the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox and the two heat exchangers on either side of it.
PXL_20201230_063915903Then we dropped the two side floors down to be about 50mm/2” above the tank tops so as to give me the maximum amount of space on either side of Mr. Gee when I’m servicing and working on him.  This Port/Left side is the service side of the Gardner 6LXB where the majority of components are such as the fuel injection system, dipstick, on engine fuel & oil filters, throttle lever, etc. so it is wider and longer and relatively clear of other obstructions other than the sea water exit manifold that connects to the exiting Sea Chest in the top Left corner.
PXL_20201230_063920585.MPPurposely a bit busier on the opposite Starboard/Right side where the dual sea water intake strainers and the sea water supply manifold live and connect to the Supply Sea Chest partially visible in the upper Right corner here behind the 127mm/5” ID exhaust hose as it exits the ER and runs under the Day Tank to exit out the side of the hull.

The red hose is now ready for Cihan to install on the side of Mr. Gee where it will transport the engine coolant (water + antifreeze) out of the ER and through a heat exchanger loop inside the Webasto IsoTherm Calorifier/water heater tank where it gives up some of its heat to our DHW Domestic Hot Water system and reduces the need for the Kabola KB45 diesel boiler to provide our DHW whenever Mr. Gee is running.
PXL_20201230_063859528.MPI am very happy with the way this has all turned out and how much it adds to our priorities of Safety, Comfort and Low Maintenance inside the ER.  In the next week or so Uğur and Nihat will be fabricating and installing the Exhaust System supports which will add even more safety to working in here and I’m already excited about showing you that.

Master Cabin is Floored!

And what is the second reason I ended the year being so floored?

PXL_20201228_084920099.PORTRAITHmmm, it sure doesn’t look that it has to do with increasing the comfort of the big bed in the Master Cabin?


PXL_20201228_084916783.PORTRAITOh wait!  This is where Ramazan has put all the planks of LVT vinyl flooring for the past 2 days so that little ceramic heater in the upper right corner can bring the temperature of everything up 20+ degrees C / 68F where Ado, the manufacturer, recommends for installation.
PXL_20201228_141559667These LVT planks are installed as a “floating floor” so no adhesive is used so that the vinyl can expand and contract a bit without causing any buckling or warping.  As we will be taking Möbius through the full spectrum of temperatures from the poles of Antarctica and the Arctic down to the tropical heat on the Equator, we need to account for these kinds of conditions.


PXL_20201231_064552368Each plank “click locks” to the next plank on both sides and ends so the installation is relatively easy but quite time consuming on a boat where there are almost no square corners or parallel lines and so all the planks at the ends and sides of each room must all be carefully and accurately custom cut and fit.

Here is a good example of that where Ramazan had to carefully cut the LVT flooring to fit just right around this area just inside the door on the full height wardrobe as you enter the Master Cabin.
PXL_20201228_141607446Ramazan started by laying out the Centerline of the hull and using that to provide the lengthwise reference line for laying down all the LVT planks.  Then he worked from there putting down the LVT planks parallel to this Centerline and cutting the edges to fit just right up against the Rosewood wall panels.
PXL_20201230_064146447The blank plywood rectangle under the vacuum is one of the many places on the Master and Guest Cabin floors that need to be removable to allow you to get at the access ports to the water and fuel tanks below all the floors.  This one in the Master Cabin is the largest of all because it spans the corners of four individual water tanks which we located here for that reason.
PXL_20201231_064414784Hey!  I would have sworn that there used to be a removable access panel here?!?

Ramazan is quite the flooring expert having apparently laid down a lot of this LVT flooring and you can see this on display here where he has been able to make the joint where the ends of the LVT blanks butt together with almost no gap at all.


Double lifting suction cup toolOn the rare occasions when we need to remove these sections of the floor to inspect or clean out a fuel or water tank, we simply use one of my favorite tools, an industrial suction cup like this which you’ve seen us using to install the big 26mm thick laminated glass panels round the Pilot House a few weeks ago.
PYI Floor Anchor DetailsWe won’t get to installing these until a bit later but in anticipation of the inevitable questions about what happens to these removable floor panels in the unlikely event of a full roll over (lets hope!), we will be installing these SS floor anchors.  I’ve used these floor anchors from PYI before on previous boats and they not only work eXtremely well, they are more bits of kit on my “boat jewelry” list for being so beautifully designed and built.
PXL_20201231_064501056Flooring pretty much all done in the Master Cabin and here is a full length shot of the floor alongside the bed leading to the stairs up to the SuperSalon.

We are eXtremely pleased with how all the various colours, materials and textures have all come together.  Not bad for two very inexperienced interior designers don’t you think?

And the indirect dimmable LED string lighting really helps to not only increase the Safety factor throughout but also really uses the Silver/White colour we chose for these LVT planks to maximum advantage in reflecting and diffusing that light across the floors and around the edges.
PXL_20201231_064511045What better way to show you the flooring than by getting down on floor level?  Best I could do to try and show you the texture of these LVT planks which works eXtremely well as a non-skid surface even with bare wet feet.

BTW, the LED strip lights are just being test fit right now and will soon be installed into their grooves with some clear silicone to keep them fully hidden and well secured.

Fitting out Mr. Gee

PXL_20201231_092009785Cihan was able to return for two days this past week and he is always a treat for me to work with and is super productive.  Remember those red hoses that connect Mr. Gee’s hot water to the Calorifier you saw in the ER in the Flooring section above?  Cihan now has them all connected and starting to insulate them to keep the heat in the water and out of the ER.
PXL_20201231_091908765This is the front Stbd/Right side of Mr. Gee and we are tapping into his AL coolant manifold up on top of the cylinder head to return the coolant from the Calorifier.
PXL_20201231_091959338We then tapped into what was a drain plug fitting in this lower coolant manifold where the water comes out of Mr. Gee’s side mounted centrifugal water pump.
PXL_20201231_093903582Over on the opposite Port/Left front corner of Mr. Gee, Cihan now has the diesel fuel return line hose connected now.
PXL_20201222_152215524With Cihan being so busy on other jobs at Naval I’ve been busy lending a hand by fabricating some of the mounts he needs to complete jobs such as mounting one of the big Electrodyne 24V 250A  alternators on that same upper left corner of Mr. Gee you see in the photo above.


PXL_20201222_152230392KISS right?  Some 20mm/ 3/4” thick AL plate gives the neccessary strength and rigidity to support this hefty alternators that tip the scales at 33kg/73lbs each.  Ask me how I know?!
PXL_20201222_104857883Once I had the two plates all drilled for the four mounting studs on Mr. Gee and had worked out the precise location of the alternator so that its serpentine belt pulley would be aligned and on the same plane as the other three pulleys I could drill and tap this 40mm/1.6” thick mounting block.
PXL_20201230_113719726After test fitting this on the Electrodyne alternator the mounting block needed a bit of trimming to fully clear the body of the alternator when bolted in place but nothing that my super handy Milwaukee angle grinder could make short work of.
PXL_20201222_153045213Here is the final result with Big Red #1 now fully fitted onto Mr. Gee. 

I’ve lost track of how many times I had to lift all 33kg of this beautiful red beast up and down to get these mounts all worked out but I’m thankful for the workout that helps me keep my girlish figure I guess! Smile

Also pleased with the way this mount will work out position wise to give me good access for future maintenance and with being rock solid to carry on the Gardner tradition that Mr. Gee demands.
PXL_20201222_153052827[4]For those wondering, the six terminal studs on the sides of the junction boxes on each Electrodyne are where the AC current comes out of the two “Siamese twin” alternators inside each Electrodyne and then carry that 3 phase AC current over to the external Rectifiers mounted outside the ER over on the Stbd/Right side of the Workshop. 
PXL_20201222_153026382That AC current will be carried by those 12 Red cables, 6 from each Electrodyne, that you can see coiled up to the Right of the alternator and in some of the photos in the ER Flooring section above. 

Next up for me is to work on getting all the cogged belt pulleys mounted and aligned but that will have to wait till next week.

I Can See CLEARLY NOW!

PXL_20201125_143726657.MPSaving the “Clearly” part of this week’s title for this last part of our Show & Tell this week as this is another one of those big milestone events in the build for Christine and me.  It actually all started more than a month ago when this photo was taken.  Do you see the clues as to what this is all about?
PXL_20201125_143924192.MPDoes this closeup help you guess?
PXL_20201125_120008079.MPCorrect!  This was when the acrylic team from Hakan Glass was onboard back in November to build the hardboard templates for each of the 15 removable acrylic windows that will allow us to make the whole SkyBridge weatherproof!
PXL_20201129_115124003Let me backup a bit and show you the design that I worked out with the guys at Hakan Glass.  This test sample they made will help me show you how it all works. 

Four basic components …………………… 
PXL_20201129_1152268231.  The clear 8mm / 3/8” thick cast acrylic sheet that forms the tough windows.  Cast acrylic is more heat and scratch resistant than common Plexiglass which is usually extruded.  Acrylic has a tensile strength >10,000 lbs/sq inch and an impact resistance about 17 times greater than ordinary glass and under high impact, (cyclones anyone?)  it won’t shatter and if it does break it fractures into large, dull-edged pieces.

Acrylic is also eXtremely clear, half the weight of glass and resistant to most chemicals.

Clear, Safe, weatherproof, not easily scratched.

Low Maintenance – Check image
PXL_20201129_1152092642.  Aluminium anodized U-channel extrusions for the track frames that hold the acrylic sheets in place.  Note that the U-channel on the Left has its upper side cut down to be half as high as the regular one on the Right as that is key to how this system works as I’ll explain in a minute.

Being anodized AL these U-channel extrusions are easy to keep clean and never oxidise. 

Low Maintenance – Check image
 PXL_20201223_1055357053.  Black EPDM rubber edge molding that keeps the sheets tightly in their frames so they don’t rattle or move.

Simple, Secure & Quiet 

imageComfort – Check


PXL_20201129_1154504784.  To add some Secret Sauce to the mix let’s stir in two strips of these silicone magnetic seals that are typically used on glass shower doors.

Simple to use, Clear, Long lasting & Weathertight.

imageComfort + Low Maintenance – Check


PXL_20201129_115332914Now let’s put it all together to see the solution we’ve cooked up for Möbius’ SkyBridge.

Remember how we cut off half of the height of one side of the lower U-channel? That’s what you are seeing here.  With half the height of the inside wall of the bottom U-channel, you can push the acrylic sheet all the way up into the full sized upper U-channel which allows you to now push the bottom edge of the acrylic panel into the U-channel and then push it down and presto, you’re done!
My inspiration for this design comes from something most of you would likely know from putting bug screens in and out of the outside windows in your home.  You know the ones where you remove them by pushing the frame of the bug screen up into the top U-channel in the window frame and then pull the bottom out of the lower U-channel which it now clears. 

There is always great elegance to me in simplicity.


PXL_20201129_115614198PXL_20201129_115615688But what about where two acrylic sheets need to butt together on the long side stretches of the SkyBridge you ask? 

Aha!  Simple, just press a length of these silicone shower door strips onto each edge and their internal magnets snap the gap shut.
PXL_20201223_080352298Last step, with each acrylic panel installed just press the Black EPDM rubber edge molding firmly into the small space between the inside edge of the AL U-channel to lock the acrylic tightly in place.

PXL_20201129_115749566et voilà! 


PXL_20201225_092829292.MPYou’ve can now clearly see those beautiful views all around you from this premium vantage point high above the water while all the wind and rain stay outside and you are completely dry and comfy inside.
Wait …………………. What’s that you say?  You are now in the tropics and it is hot and humid?  You want those high up beautiful views more than ever but you also want some good breezes and fresh air? 

No problem.  Möbius has you covered.  Just lift out as many of those acrylic window panels as you’d like because every one of them is removable!
Double lifting suction cup tool  But how would you remove them you ask?

Ahhh, remember out little friend from the previous section on how we lift out the removable floor panels?  Yup, that same little fella works even better to grab onto those sleek smooth acrylic panels and quick lift up and out comes the panel to be stowed away while all those fresh tropical breezes flow through and keep you cool and smiling.

Well, you get the idea.


OK, now let me quickly flash through what the process looked as the talented boys from Hakan Glass cooked up this recipe of 4 simple ingredients I had put together:

PXL_20201113_122015789Start by cutting some of these 3m/10’ lengths of anodized AL U-channel in a table saw to take off 1/2 the height of the one edge for the bottom and some of the side frames.
PXL_20201123_071104967Glue the U-channel pieces to the tops and bottoms of the AL framed openings of the SkyBridge and its roof using clear industrial epoxy adhesive.
PXL_20201124_142542680.MPOnce all the lengths of U-channel have been affixed, tape off the joints where the U-Chanel joins with the frames of the SkyBridge on the inside and outside ….
PXL_20201124_142624795 ……. then apply a small cove of black Sikaflex 296 to completely seal these joints and add a nice visual accent to these edges.
PXL_20201125_115922255.MPCut and fit hardboard to create templates for each removable acrylic window panel.
PXL_20201125_115931904Cut and fit the two magnetic edge seals where two acrylic window panels meet to make sure that the size of the templates are just right when they are pushed Up/Down into place and the two aft corner panels are also pushed sideways into their vertical U-channels.
PXL_20201125_143934495.MPRinse and Repeat for all 15 window panels surrounding the SkyBridge and then take the templates back to the Hakan workshop to cut them all to size.
PXL_20201221_141347712Two weeks later, make Wayne’s day by bringing all 15 acrylic window panels to him on Möbius.
PXL_20201223_080125135.MPClean up all the edges of the acrylic panels and start fitting each numbered panel to its awaiting U-channel frames.
PXL_20201223_080139193Finish off the Black Sikaflex sealant and remove all the Blue painters tape.
PXL_20201223_080405387Let Wayne double check that the EPDM seals squeeze each acrylic window panel to his just right Goldilocks fit to help them seal and be rattle proof.

Sheesh!  Some Owners are SO fussy!
PXL_20201223_080552036Peel off all the protective plastic covering on the outside and ….
PXL_20201223_080632921 ……. inside of each acrylic panel.

Note the 10 year guarantee!
PXL_20201223_105201917.MPClean up the Sikaflex seals on the inside and clean off all the aluminium with solvent.
PXL_20201223_105351841Let Mr. Fussy get his kicks by checking out how slickly and strongly these magnetic strips old the vertical edge joints together and get tighter as the wind pushes against them.
PXL_20201223_105929636Sides and Aft end panels all in place now with their magnetic seals and Black edge trim.
PXL_20201223_110802698.MPFinish putting in the Black EPDM strips on the three front facing windows.
PXL_20201225_092829292.MPStand back and take a tour around the boat to admire this outstanding job!
PXL_20201225_103154314Crystal clear view out the Aft facing windows from the outside and …..
PXL_20201225_103245634 …… the inside.
PXL_20201225_103230551And all clear from the Upper Helm Captain!
PXL_20201223_083739660.MPAnd looks eXtremely sharp from the outside too!

Well done Hakan Glass!  Gold stars to you all with our thanks for such clearly outstanding work!
And that’s a wrap for the week, the month and the year that was 2020!

Happy New Year to one and all and we can’t wait to bring you the final episodes as all of us on Team Möbius renew our efforts to finish off Project Goldilocks and put this awemazing boat, and her Owners where they belong; IN THE WATER!!!

See you again next week as we get 2021 off to a rapid start!

-Wayne













PXL_20201122_095015832

Up to my Assets in Glassets! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Nov 23-27, 2020

Team Möbius might not be back to work yet but two of our sub contractors were and Wow! did they and we ever make some great progress and hit some very eXciting new milestones.  As per the title both of these sub contractors were in the glass business, one with “real” glass and the other with the acrylic based often colloquially referred to as plexiglass.  For simplicity and clarity, I will use glass and plexi in this article. 

By whatever name you prefer, we were definately up to our ass (ets) in glass this week.  We have glass for all the 360 degrees of windows surrounding the SuperSalon or Pilothouse, glass in all the 10 deck hatches, another 360 degrees of tinted glass around the bottom panels of the SkyBridge coaming, glass for the Guest Shower door, glass tiles in the Master Head/Bathroom, plexi for the 360 degrees of windows around the entire SkyBridge, and then of course the “pièce de résistance en verre”  the etched glass corner walls for the Master Shower. 

As you are about to see then, it is really not just typical eXaggeration from your author to say that I was up to my assets in glass this week!  And before I torture you any further with this play on words, let’s just jump right into this week’s Show & Tell so you can see for yourself.

Pilothouse/SuperSalon Window Glass

PXL_20201126_080613891There were a bunch more milestones this week but the biggest one for Christine and I was to see this truck load of glass from Hakan Glass here in Antalya, arrive with all the glass that will close in the whole Pilothouse.* 


* This area of our boat and all the XPMs can be called either Pilothouse, Wheelhouse or our moniker of “SuperSalon” but for clarity I’ll stick with just PH for the rest of this article OK?

BTW, many of you might be surprised to know that Turkey is one of the world’s largest glass manufacturers!  With thanks to Baris at Naval Yachts for providing me this information, you can check out the factory where our glass was made HERE.  This will give you a bit more information on “Paşabahçe” which is the biggest glass factory in the republic of Turkey’s and responsible for making glass one of Turkey’s top industries economically.  For those interested in more about the long history of glass manufacturing in Turkey be sure to check out THIS site that does a great job of walking you quickly through the history from when  ​​Atatürk started all this in 1934.


PXL_20201126_080629205.MPThe reason this is such a big milestone for us is that once all the window glass is installed around the 360 degrees of the PH along with these square glass pieces which will be adhered to each of the ten Deck Hatches, Möbius is WATERTIGHT! 

As you may recall seeing in previous months, all the Watertight doors are in and so once the PH and Deck Hatch glass is all in, we are fully weather and water tight!
PXL_20201126_080704548In addition to the glass windows for the PH and the Deck Hatches, the truck also had the slender glass panels that wrap around the bottom edge of the SkyBridge coaming.
PXL_20201126_081434579First challenge though was to get each of these eXtremely heavy pieces of glass off the truck ………………
PXL_20201126_081441669……. up the stairs leading up to the Swim Platform ………..



PXL_20201126_124820515……. then up the winding stairs onto the Aft Deck …………..
PXL_20201126_081447095.MP…… and then onto the wood pallet on the Aft Deck  ……..
PXL_20201126_080441706…….. where they will be stored before being moved into their respective aluminium window frames.

Whew!
PXL_20201126_080657996.MPThis shot showing the edges of two of the PH glass windows on the Left and 7 of the Deck Hatch glass panels will help you see why these glass panels are so heavy.
PXL_20201126_081338338The PH glass windows are made from triple laminations of 8mm / 5/16” thick glass and the Deck Hatch glass is made from double laminations of 8mm glass.
PXL_20201126_081547332With three 8mm glass laminations plus two layers of laminating adhesive which are each about 1mm thick, each of the PH glass windows ends up about 26mm or just over 1” thick. 
PXL_20201126_081612574These are but a few of the glass windows required:

20 pieces for the PH windows

12 pieces for the SkyBridge “eyebrow”

10 pieces for the Deck Hatches


PXL_20201126_081447095.MPEach one of these PH glass windows have been custom cut to match the exact sizes of plywood templates the Hakan Glass team had made a few weeks ago so each one is a bit different but on average each window weighed about 22kg / 48 lbs and so this all started with a LOT of heavy lifting!
PXL_20201126_085734751For adhesive, after consulting with the application experts at Hakan Glass and at Sikaflex, we chose Sikaflex 296 along with …..
PXL_20201126_101529957……. with SP-206GP primer. 

This is the best combination for structural adhesion between glass and aluminium and is often what you see used on commercial buildings whose exterior surfaces are clad with glass.
PXL_20201126_084705422.MPThe process begins with the application of the Sikaflex SP-206GB primer that goes on both the aluminium surfaces that the glass will be bonded to ……….
PXL_20201127_103059374.MP ……….. and the inner perimeter of the glass that will be adhered to the aluminium.
PXL_20201126_100405167.MPOnce the primer is cured, each window can be carefully carried from the Aft Deck to its respective window bay.
PXL_20201126_100836937.MPThen a thick bead of Sikaflex 296 is laid down around the outer perimeter of the aluminium window frame.
PXL_20201127_062038519Having the right tools for the job always helps and this Milwaukee cordless caulking gun sure beats all the years I’ve had to hand pump window caulking.

The triple aluminium suction cup is one of many we used to lift the window glass into place and push/pull into the right position.
PXL_20201126_125219113Previously that day I had gone around and pulled the leather window mullion covers away from their frames where we have used the new plastic style of “velcro” to hold them in place and I had run a wide strip of Blue painters tape along the Rosewood edges in case any of the Sikaflex oozed its way there.
PXL_20201126_104735987Next PH window glass ready to be lifted into place …
PXL_20201126_095140196.MP ….. and pressed firmly into place. 
PXL_20201126_095159018The Sikaflex 296 both bonds the aluminium and the glass to each other as well as filling in the gap between the aluminium faces of the window frames which can have a bit of waviness to them, and the perfectly flat glass surfaces.  Typically the thickness of the Sikaflex ends up being about 5mm / 0.2”.
PXL_20201126_125516774small wooden spacers are used to keep the glass edges an equal distance away from the AL frames.
PXL_20201127_062057141Some scrap pieces of Teak (who knew there was such a thing??) were pressed into service to act as spring loaded pressure clamps ….
PXL_20201127_085720549…….. to keep these negatively raked front windows tight up against the frames overnight while the Sikaflex cured.
PXL_20201127_074140784Similar process on the other end where there are three panes of glass along the Aft end of the Galley.
PXL_20201127_101501833It is pretty much a “rinse and repeat” process from there to put all 20 glass windows into place.
PXL_20201127_123743065Pardon the mess but this will help show you how it all looks from inside.  This is the Aft Starboard/Right corner of the SuperSalon where the Galley is.
PXL_20201126_145448193This is looking forward from the Galley towards the Bow.  If you look closely you might be able to see that these five front windows are all completely clear glass where the rest of the side and rear windows have a slight Gray tint to them as they have a UV blocking film on the inside surface of one of the laminations. 
PXL_20201126_130002760.MPWith no glass in the Left window and one of the tinted ones on the Right you can see the amount of tint the side and rear windows have.


Tinting is one of those things you want to get to that Goldilocks just right point but it is difficult to judge or calculate other than by experience in situ.  So we will live with the glass like this for the first year or so and then decide if we want to add a film to the inside surfaces for more privacy blocking or heat blocking as some of the newer window films that are now available are truly amazing.


PXL_20201127_101019967This is how the outside is shaping up when viewed from down on the shop floor.

Also a preview of what I’ll show you next which is the glass “eyebrow” around the bottom edges of the SkyBridge coaming up above.

Clint Eastwood’s Squint

Mobius 05This early rendering will help show you how the exterior will look when all glassed in and you can see the thin band of tinted glass that runs around the edge of the coaming (walls) of the upper SkyBridge.
Möbius in IcelandSeveral years ago now when we were working with our awemazing NA and designer Dennis Harjamaa at Artnautica Yacht Design in Auckland NZ, he jokingly remarked that the combination of shapes ……
Stbd Aft SkyBridge ……. of the narrowing vertical height of the PH glass as it makes the transition forward/aft along with the thin upper height of the tinted SkyBridge glass, reminded him of that squint that Clint Eastwood made famous in his early western movies.
PH Vent Tunnel under solar panelsWe all got a good laugh out of we have kept referring to the Clint Eastwood Squint ever since.  Clint is always a good guy to have on YOUR side so we figure this helps add to our “Don’t mess with me!” look.
PXL_20201127_062141556Here you can see the framing that wraps around the SkyBridge.  The narrow bottom frames are about to be filled with tinted glass and next week the upper frames will be filled with plexi.
PXL_20201127_090936190.MPSame process as with the PH glass; apply the Sikaflex Primer to the outer perimeter of the AL frames and the glass ……..
PXL_20201127_091853971.MP ……. run a generous bead of 296 around the AL frames ……..
PXL_20201127_091900734.MP ….. and press the glass into place.


PXL_20201127_085710706Rinse and Repeat.
PXL_20201127_101518210Aft Stbd/Right corner all done.
PXL_20201127_101722009.MPFront 3 panels in place too.
PXL_20201127_090925511Here is how it looks so far when viewed from the inside.

PXL_20201127_101019967And here is what it looked like by end of the day on Friday.

Last two PH windows still to go in next week.


Deck Hatch Glass
Hatch Layout Numbered

We have a total of ten hatches spread out on the decks of Möbius and they all have double laminated glass lids on them.


Open Hatch 2

You may recall seeing these Deck Hatches which I designed back at the beginning of the build and then Team Möbius built them in house.  They have been sitting and waiting for their glass tops so it was eXtremely exciting for me to see this last part of the puzzle fit into place.


PXL_20201126_081401843Each hatch will have one of these double laminated glass panels bonded to them.  Two 6mm glass laminations with about 1mm of adhesive and the thickness of the black film inside creates eXtremely strong glass lids that are about 14mm thick.
PXL_20201126_080649542.MPThe hinged aluminium hatch lids are made from 10mm / the 3/8” thick AL plate and so each of the glass hatch lids have black film sandwiched between the two laminations that matches up with the shape of the AL lids where they will be bonded to the glass.
PXL_20201126_125333530First Deck Hatch to get its lid was this one on the Port/Left side of the Aft Deck.

We carry quite a few of these suction cup tools with us as they come on handy for SO many different jobs.  We use them to give us a handle on the bottom of the hull when we are cleaning it every few months Hookah “Snuba” setup and we also use them to remove and replace the FastMount panels on the interior of the boat.
PXL_20201126_125350179This hatch is directly overtop of my workbench in the Workshop down below and I can already feel those breezes wafting down on me and the sunlight pouring in as I work down there.
PXL_20201127_101831405.MPThe Hakan boys prepping the AL hatch lid in front of the Port/Left Vent Box which is #4 in the hatch layout diagram up above.  You can see the shape of the AL lids with their cross bar that matches up with the black film you see on the hatch glass.
PXL_20201127_104037832Same process repeated as with the PH glass; first apply the Sikaflex primer to both the AL bonding surfaces …….
PXL_20201127_103052592.MPand the glass surfaces.
PXL_20201127_101820173Butter the AL with a generous bead of 296 and press the glass into place. 
PXL_20201127_104250407Sikaflex 296 takes several hours to cure so you have lots of time to nudge the glass into the Goldilocks position so that the gap is perfectly even around all four sides of the hatch opening.
PXL_20201127_123808034Both of the smaller 400mm / 16” hatches in front of the two Vent Boxes on the Aft Deck are all done.  These two Vent Boxes also create our Outside Galley.
PXL_20201127_123902985Seen from the Stbd/Right side of the Aft Deck to see those same two hatches as well as the larger 700mm / 28” square hatch underneath the spiral staircase leading up to the SkyBridge.  These are numbers 4, 5 and 6 in the hatch layout diagram above.
PXL_20201127_124051677Popping up into the SkyBridge to check out Hatch #7 on the “day bed” up there beside the SkyBridge Helm Station. 

Our Llebroc Helm Chair is what is underneath all that plastic wrapping in case you are wondering.

This hatch will be eXtremely helpful and open most of the time as it allows us to easily talk with each other when one is in this Upper Helm and the other is down below in the Galley or SuperSalon.  Also makes it easy to pass up a coffee or meal from the Galley below.
PXL_20201127_123454277Here are a few shots of how these hatches look from the inside.  This one is about centered in the Guest Cabin which will most often be configured as Christine’s Office.
PXL_20201127_123511994This smaller one is directly above Christine’s Office desk so she too will have plenty of fresh air when this hatch is open and lots of natural sunlight all the time.
PXL_20201127_123528865Lots of fresh air and light pouring into the Guest Shower as well.
PXL_20201127_102359377Back up on the Aft Deck, I wanted to double check the glass clearances so I brought up one sheet of TreadMaster that we will soon be applying to all the deck surfaces.   The Treadmaster will be about 5mm thick once glued down with West Systems epoxy adhesive so I designed the hatch geometry such that the top surface of the glass sits about 2mm above the AL Deck surfaces. 
PXL_20201127_102350445This way the glass surfaces will be just slightly lower than the top surface of the Treadmaster and be very foot friendly.

For those wondering, we will be putting multiple strips of non skid tape across each Glass Hatch so they are very safe to walk on.

GUEST SHOWER GLASS

PXL_20201126_083919538Based on your comments, many of you will think that I have saved the best for last as all the glass for our Guest and Master Heads/Bathrooms and Showers also arrived this week!  Different company that specializes in shower glass and they arrived on Thursday as well to do the installation.
PXL_20201126_073800841This is the simplest part, the clear glass door into the Guest Shower. 
PXL_20201126_081717970This door has a full height anodized AL hinge that bolts directly to the Rosewood door jamb.
PXL_20201126_084545635.MPThen a matching AL channel on the opposite side ….
PXL_20201126_084550511…… with the magnetic silicone seal, handle and latch.

Works great in the “dry run” and we will test it out with a real shower after we launch.

MASTER SHOWER GLASS:


PXL_20201126_095415289Moving up to the Master Cabin Head/Shower/Bathroom, they installed this clear glass separator between the Shower on the Left and Bathroom counter and cabinets on the right.
PXL_20201126_095410694.MPAs you can see we designed this partition to stop short of the ceiling so that all the fresh air pouring in through that big 700mm square hatch up above can flow into both the Shower and the Head/Bathroom.
PXL_20201127_123617524And as if we didn’t have enough going on aboard Möbius Thursday and Friday, the tile man showed up to install the glass tile accent on the side wall of the Head!
PXL_20201127_123710348[3]Christine had picked these glass tiles out months ago and they have been patiently waiting to come out of their box and be where they belong.

PXL_20201127_151703743.MPWasn’t a big job so he was literally done in less than 2 hours and we think this little detail adds just the right amount of colour and texture to this otherwise all white room.

PXL_20201126_073829407.NIGHTBut of course what really stole the show this week is this “pièce de résistance en verre” , the two etched glass corner walls for the Master Shower.
PXL_20201126_074316094.MPThe more narrow 700mm wide wall panel goes athwartships and then the wider 1200mm panel goes in lengthwise to create this gorgeous etched class corner.
PXL_20201126_080414146Very simple mounting of the glass into rabbets in the Rosewood panels surrounding each glass plate which are then filled with clear silicone to hold them in place.


PXL_20201126_095654615Blue Painters tape and some wood shims at the bottom were all that are neccessary to get them all lined up and ready for the silicone adhesive/sealant.

BTW, ALL of the credit for this work of art goes to our dearest friend Sherry Cooper in Vancouver BC.  If you have not already seen THIS blog post from two weeks ago where I covered her work in more details, please do go check that out.

If you don’t have time for that and want to find out more about Sherry you can check out her other works HERE and HERE as well as her Instagram page HERE.  Below is a quick synopsis of what I wrote.

Christine and I worked with Sherry to describe as best we could what we wanted to achiever with these etched patterns which was things such as a marine/nautical theme, a taste of First Nation people’s art from the British Columbia area we know and love and to have all this captured in a somewhat abstract and ethereal way.

This is what Sherry came up with and we think the nailed it!  A perfect example of our favorite Goldilocks; just right, just for us type of result.


PXL_20201127_151755187Stepping back a bit to try to show how the whole thing will look when done.  Even with all the plastic protective coating and painters tape this work of art and engineering shines through with almost blinding beauty.

PXL_20201126_095443979Difficult to capture the inside of this small space but this will hopefully give you a rough idea of what the finished shower will look like and just how magical it will be taking a shower in here every morning!


I got more work done on the cogged belt drive system that is going onto Mr. Gee to drive one of our two Electrodyne “Big Red” 250Amp @ 28V alternators and the Jabsco sea water pump but it is already very late Sunday night here so I will cover all that for you next week.

But WAIT!  There’s more!!

IMG_0866Speaking of “assets”, the winter rains are about to arrive here in Antalya, as early as tonight according to Christine’s weather apps so we took advantage of today being a truly sunny Sunday, to go for a nice long bike ride along the eXtremely well done bike paths along the 20+ kilometers of the crescent shaped beachfront that Antalya stretches along. 
IMG_0867Like most places in the world right now we are under stronger restrictions but we are allowed out in the mornings so we took advantage of that for this bike ride and stopped for a lovely little picnic lunch on this stone beach section for an hour or so before heading home to write up this blog.
The Med here is still plenty warm enough for swimming and it was almost too hot in the sun here just before noon.  All of this adding to the hundreds of other things that both Christine and I have to be SO thankful for as we wish all our American friends and family the very best for their Thanksgiving weekend.

Thank you all SO much for taking time to join me here again this week AND for adding your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below!

Hopefully Team Möbius is back next week and we will have much more progress to show you.

– Wayne








 







=======================

When you can’t Get Over it; Get UNDER It! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Nov. 10-13, 2020

As you read this week’s Progress Update below you will understand what I am referencing in this week’s title as to how we solved the most recent challenge in the building of XPM78-01 Möbius by going under rather than over the problem.  Unfortunately on Friday (did it matter that it was the 13th?)  we were hit by a much different and much more challenging problem which there is just no getting over, around or under, when several workers at Naval Yachts tested positive and there was no choice but to shut the whole company for the next 17 days and do all the contact tracing and testing of all those employees who have been in direct contact.  If all goes well Naval, and certainly Christine and I, hope to reopen on November 30th.  I’m sure you join us in wishing everyone involved the very best wishes and that there are no serious health consequences for any of us here.

To be clear and not cause any undue concern on your part, as good fortune would have it, neither Christine or myself have had any direct contact with any of these workers for the past two weeks.  Furthermore, we have always been very self disciplined with our precautions of wearing masks any time there is any possibility of being in a place with others or where others have been recently such as the elevators in our apartment.  We are both quite naturally introverts and previous single handed sailors so it has been relatively easy for us to keep to ourselves and staying as much as possible.  And we are both quite fit and healthy, especially for two sixty somethings so I am pleased to let you know that we both feel very fit, healthy and happy and are doing everything we can to stay that way.

This may be as my kids used to say “TMI Dad!!”, as in Too Much Information to share, but the value of these kinds of blogs come in large part through their openness, transparency and honesty so I felt the need to share this brief insight into what is going on here and why there will not be much progress to report on for the remainder of this month of November.  Hopefully all will go well and Naval will reopen on Nov. 30th with all of us healthy so we can hit the ground running and get Möbius finished and launched ASAP.

Now back to our regular programming as I think they used to say on radio and TV, as I do have several fun and exciting things to update you on from aboard the good ship Möbius for the week that was November10th through 13th.

I think it is quite true that laughter is the best medicine so let me start by sharing this fun cartoon, courtesy of the appropriately named Bizarrow Comics who focuses on such topics as Pirates, Cowboys, Snowmen, Doctors, well you get the idea.

Mobius Dick cartoon image This was one of their Daily Comics this past week and it must have been making the rounds on the internet as several of you sent this to us right about the same time Christine and I were both seeing it.  Thanks Matt et al!

How appropriate and fun for us right?

Getting Under Mr. Gee

Let’s move on to the reference in this week’s title to a problem that we were able to solve by going under rather than over it.  To put it in context, this was part of Hussein and I working on the alignment of the whole “propulsion” unit formed by Mr. Gee being bolted to the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox which in turn is bolted to the big 65mm / 2.6” SS prop shaft which has the big bronze 1 meter / 39.4” four bladed CPP prop on its far end.

That is a long description that is hard to track and I have received quite a few questions and comments about both the Nogva CPP (Controllable Pitch Propeller) and this whole alignment process so for those interested, let me break it down and provide more details.


Nogva CPP my simple dim hand sketch

Here is my very rough sketch from over a year ago when we were figuring out the exact dimensions for installing the aluminium Nogva Prop Log which is the “pipe” you see over on the far Left here. 
I’m hoping that this will give you the big picture view that helps to show how this Propulsion System is one solid mass from the front of the Gardner in Blue on the far Right, through the Nogva Servo Gearbox in Brown in the middle with the two flanges connecting to the Fwd/Right end of the prop shaft and over through the Prop Log, out through the end of the skeg where the CPP propeller in Green sits.

Nogva CPP prop   shaft dim dwg from NogvaHere is the dimensioned drawing from the Nogva engineers I worked with to design this custom CPP system for Möbius.  It shows how the Propeller Shaft runs inside the larger inside diameter Prop Log Tube
Nogva CPP my hand sketch This is the drawing above with some of the many dimensions I was pulling off of the actual installation at the time so I could double check that my 3D model of all this was exactly the same dimensions as the real deal.

No need for you to pay any attention to all these dimensions but I thought that this front to back view might be helpful for those trying to visualise this whole setup and see the relationships between all the individual parts.
Gardner & Nogva mounts screen shotNext up, let’s take a look at the six anti-vibration “feet” or mounts where Mr. Gee and the Nogva CPP are attached to the 25mm/1” thick engine beds running the full length of both sides of the Engine Room. 
I have never had enough time to create a full 3D model of Mr. Gee so you will have to use your imagination in the blank space to the Left of the Red Nogva Servo Gearbox, but hopefully this quick render of my Fusion 360 model will help you see how these six feet connect the whole Propulsion System to the Hull.
Front   Rear Gardner mounting brackets screen grabI initially created this 3D model when I was designing these custom brackets that bolt to Mr. Gee’ thick cast AL crankcase and create the eXtremely strong and rigid attachment points for the vertical threaded adjustment rods on each foot/mount.  Front mount is on the Left, Rear on the Right and both of these feet/mounts are the same anti-vibration models with thick rubber isolation blocks inside.
Engine isolation mounts image 1This is what those Front & Rear anti-vibration mounts look like and of course Mr. Gee requires the MMXL version!
PXL_20201112_065937889Back in the real world inside the Engine Room, this is Mr. Gee’s Front Port/Left foot after we have lifted the whole Propulsion System up with big chain hoists to drill the holes for the M16 Grade 8 bolts that will hold each mount solidly to the Engine Beds in precisely the right location Fore/Aft and Left/Right.
Nogva mounting bracket screen grabHere is a closer view of the mounting bracket I designed to be welded into the underside of the two Engine Beds and how these two different style of feet connect the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox to the Engine Beds and Hull.  Also a good shot of the output flange on the Aft end which is what need to get so precisely aligned with the matching flange on the forward end of the Prop Shaft.
Volvo Penta motor mounts photo from Yach Boat Parts dot comHere is what these highly specialised feet/mounts on the Nogva look like in the manufacturers catalogue before I purchased them.  These start out being the same as any other feet/mounts by providing the rubber isolation that separates the upper body with the threaded rod from the metal base that bolts to the Engine Beds.  However if you look closely you will see that there are also two large diameter SS pins going side to side across the Base through the elongated oval shaped rubber isolation block.
PXL_20201112_083334231Here is a bit closer view one of those two Nogva feet in my hand to try and show you those two pins and the rubber isolation block.  Why are the Nogva mounts different than Mr. Gee’s some of you have asked.  Because in addition to providing the anti-vibration connection to the Engine Beds these also deal with the very significant THRUST forces which would otherwise be trying to push/pull the whole Propulsion System fore and aft as the propeller “bites” into the water and pushes the boat forward or reverse.
The Nogva Servo Gearbox is built to be mounted solidly to a hull with no anti-vibration mounts in large commercial vessels so it also has its own thrust bearing setup inside to fully deal with all these eXtreme Thrust forces.  However with one of our first principles being Comfort, the addition of these specialised thrust feet/mounts will help eliminate the transmission of vibration and noise to the hull and make for an eXtremely smooth and quiet boat when underway.

PXL_20201112_081122230This is what the real deal looks like as we were drilling the mounting bolt holes in the Engine Beds, hence all the AL chips.

Good shot of the custom Rear brackets bolted to Mr. Gee on the Left side and the underslung bracket for the Nogva feet/mounts over on the Right.
PXL_20201112_132637277Putting it all together, this shows you the whole Port/Left side of the Propulsion System with all three mounting brackets and their feet/mounts.

But hang on a minute …………………………………………

………………………… what the heck is that underneath Mr. Gee?!?!?!?!?!?

Let’s zoom in a bit closer to find out………………
PXL_20201112_132630050Aha!  So THAT is what this week’s title is referring to about “ When you can’t get Over it; Get Under it!”. 

So what was the problem that required raising the whole Propulsion up in the air and me spending all day Thursday up close and personal with Mr. Gee’s underbelly?

Well, as Murphy’s Law would have it, when Hussein drilled those two holes for the middle two feet on the Aft end of Mr. Gee, they turned out to be right on top of a 15mm thick vertical AL stringer running down the length of each Engine Bed.  Ugh!  This meant that while the threaded ends of the mounting bolts could go through there was no space for the washers and nuts underneath!!!  Grrrrrrrrr


Front   Rear Gardner mounting brackets screen grabGoing back to this render you can see that 15mm vertical stringer underneath the Front foot/mount where it was NOT a problem as the mounting bolts are further off centerline but if you follow that stringer Aft/Right you can see how it runs right through the centerline of the two bolts in the Aft Foot/Mount on Mr. Gee and hence this problem.


The solution?  A rectangular slot was going to need to be cut into the stringer where it was welded to the underside of the Engine Bed to create enough space for the thick washers and nuts to slide into.


PXL_20201112_132632913We tried to solve this problem by going Over the Engine Beds but as you can perhaps see, there wasn’t enough room to get in there with drills, Dremel tools, chisels and files.  We could have used a plasma gun but it would have spewed molten aluminium all over the Engine Room so that was a non-starter.

*someone* was going to need to go at this problem from the UNDER side.  As you may recall from seeing Hussein in some previous posts and down below, there as simply no way HE was going to fit in there, so guess who was elected???  No recount needed by the way!


With the Propulsion System firmly blocked up on all four corners I could pull out some of my Houdini moves and slither into this space with my headlamp and use various WMD, Weapons of Mass Deletion, to cut a rectangular slot in the vertical stringer under the four bolt holes.  I was one pooped Pirate when I finally got home to my Captain at the end of the day but it worked  as planned and there was now plenty of room for the nuts and washers for the bolts for these two middle feet/mounts to thread into.  Whew!


PXL_20201112_065648729Going back in time a bit, in order to lift the whole Propulsion System up in the air so I could get underneath to cut those four slots, Hussein, Nihat and I had rigged up these two lengths of square steel tubing that Nihat had welded large D-rings to the middle underside and spanned the big hatch in the Aft Deck. 
PXL_20201112_081117099We then hooked a large chain hoist onto each D-ring and connected their bottom hooks to straps around the front end of Mr. Gee and the built in lifting eye on the Nogva.

It all worked very well and also gave us a very safe and precise way just barely to take the weight off of the six feet/mounts so we could move them in their Goldilocks Just Right locations as we fully align the two flanges which is the next step in this process.

ALIGNING the PROPULSION SYSTEM:

PXL_20201027_143240526This is the first part of the alignment challenge: get that male threaded end of the CPP Pitch Push/Pull rod coming out of the center of the Prop Shaft, PERFECTLY aligned with the female threaded Pitch Piston protruding out of the center of the output flange on the Nogva Servo Gearbox.


The prop shaft and pitch rod are fixed in position so they can’t move Up/Down or Left/Right, they both just rotate concentric with each other.  So the alignment has to happen by changing the angle of the Propulsion System.


PXL_20201027_141353695It is a slow and exacting process where we slide the feet/mounts to adjust the Left/Right position of the centre of the Nogva Pitch Piston/Flange and then adjust those big adjustment nuts on the vertical threaded rods on each of the six feet to change the angle of the Propulsion System and move the centre of the Pitch Piston/Flange Up/Down in the process.

It took several hours going back and forth from measuring and checking the Aft end here and then into the ER to tweak the six big adjustment nuts but as you can see here, we eventually hit the Goldilocks Jackpot and had the Push/Pull Pitch rod dead on center and ready to be threaded into the Pitch Piston.
PXL_20201027_150518040It was slow going turning the Pitch Piston with a wrench on those two flats so the bulb finally went on for me and I blocked the end of the wrench in position and then went outside and down to the Propeller and kept pressure pushing it forward while I rotated the bit 4 blade prop as if it were some eXtremely long bolt and that worked perfectly.
Nogva Pitch Control Rod   Flange dim dwg from Installation GuideThe last bit of precision is to get the length of that exposed threaded section of the Push/Pull rod above, to be precisely 7.5mm away from the aft end of the hex locknut as per the Nogva installation Manual you see here.  It can actually be between 5-10mm so I set it at the middle of this range at 7.5mm and torqued the locknut down to 100nm.


* for those curious, “Servo bevegelse 50mm” is Norwegian for “Servo Travel = 50mm”.  25mm on each side of “neutral” or Zero Pitch.


PXL_20201027_161424326With the Pitch Push/Pull rod all centred and locked in place I could now put on the two split halves of this Red Prop Flange and start the second phase of the alignment process.  This has two components to it; getting the mating flange surfaces precisely parallel to each other and also getting the two flanges equally perfectly aligned with each other axially. 
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualThese two figures from the Nogva installation manual shows these two alignments very clearly and as you can see it needs to be eXtremely precise, no more than 0.05mm / .002”.  FYI, this is the thickness of THIN human hair.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPThis will all be sounding very familiar if you were with me two weeks ago when Hussein and I when through the exact same process in order to find the precise location of the base of each foot/mount so we could mark out the location of the holes for their respective bolts.  This is a photo from that previous alignment and when we, hopefully, all get back to work on Nov. 30th we will do as Hussein is doing here and use thin feeler gauges to measure and ensure that the gap around the full circumference of where these two flanges mate, is exactly the same.  I.e., they are perfectly parallel.  To get there we go through the same adjustment procedure I outlined for getting the Pitch Push/Pull rod center aligned by sliding the feet Left/Right and/or turning the threaded adjustment nuts Up/Down.


I know this is not riveting stuff for almost any of you but this is such a critical part of having a smooth quiet Propulsion System that it gives me tremendous joy and satisfaction.  Fortunately it is also not a process you need to go through very often so well worth the investment in time now.

FINISHING the EXTERIOR of the ALUMINIUM HULL
PXL_20201111_132633644

Nihat was the only member of Team Möbius on hand this four day week but he is one of our most relentless workers so he finished all his work on the Port/Left side of the hull and moved around the Bow to pick up where Uğur had left off last week.


PXL_20201111_132627390You can see the multi stage process quite well in this shot.  First the welds along each butt joint of the hull plates needs to be ground flat and flush such as you see running along Fore/Aft just below Nihat’s belt line.  Then any work marks on the surface of the plate need to be ground off which leaves a finish like the one on the far Left here.
PXL_20201111_132637944This nose on shot of the Bow shows the Start/End of this whole process with Nihat just getting started on the Left side of this photo (Stbd/Right side of the hull) which is in contrast with the surface finish on the opposite side that he has fully finished with a random orbital sander.
PXL_20201111_132646829Here is a shot looking straight onto that same finished surface.  The Waterline is about 200mm/8” above the weld at the bottom so that does not get fully ground down flush as this will all be covered wtih epoxy primer and International InterSleek 1100 foul release “Bottom Paint”, so we can use filler to get all the surfaces below the Waterline flat and smooth prior to painting these surfaces.

You Made this Bed; Now Lay in it!

PXL_20201113_115814966None of our interior crew was available this week but the big memory foam mattress has been cut to size and the cover sewn up for over a month now and it was going to be much easier to get it onboard before they put in all the glass windows around the Pilot House/Super Salon so I was able to get a strapping young worker from the boat next to us helm me wrestle the mattress aboard.

As is often the case with boat beds, their sides are no parallel and this was the case with the Right side here as it runs parallel with the side walls that curve in with the hull.  But Sinan our master upholsterer was able to quick cut the foam with his special electric knife and then resew the cut edge of the very nice mattress cover so it all fits in like a glove.
PXL_20201113_115827214 It was actually much easier than I thought it might be.  This is 30cm / 12” thick memory foam so we were able to bend it and flex it just enough to get it through the Entryway WT Door into the SuperSalon and then down that spiraling stairway into the Master Cabin in the background on the Left.


Captain Christine has not been able to be onboard for over a week so it will have to now wait until after Nov. 30th for her to come test it out.

When you get out of that Bed, Test out this Helm Chair!

PXL_20201113_122333580For similar reasons I wanted to get both our big Llebroc Helm Chairs aboard before the glass company arrives next week to install all the  SuperSalon glass windows and all the plexiglass windows around the whole upper SkyBridge.


PXL_20201113_122348521This is the LLebroc Tradewinds CX HB SERIES 2 Helm Chair now resting in its new home in front of the SkyBridge Helm Station.

We also moved the slightly different and just as cool Llebroc Bandera Series 2 Helm Chair into the Super Salon Helm Station but I didn’t get a chance to take any photos so you’ll have to wait till we get back onboard for me to show you that beauty.


LUBRICANTS!

PXL_20201113_080905556It felt very good for me to be finally moving things like these Helm Chairs onboard to their final resting place as it makes the Launching of Möbius feel that much closer and real.  I had the same feeling when I was also moving these three 18 litre/5 USG cans of hydraulic steering oil onboard on Friday.  This will soon be filling up our 55L hydraulic steering oil tank that feeds our whole Kobelt steering system and I’ll show you that as it happens.


PXL_20201113_081621764

Next up were these three cans with almost 60 liters / 15 USG or one of my favorite engine oils; Shell Rimula R4X 15W-40. 
PXL_20201113_081605823In addition to being a top quality engine oil I have found this to be one of the easiest brands to find most anywhere in the world as this is also commonly specified by the big diesel engine companies for use in tractors, trucks, cranes, etc. that are needed and used most everywhere.


I also moved all our anti-freeze onboard but didn’t get any photos, which I’m sure you are all so sad about. Not!!

And that’s all from your intrepid cub reporter here in Antalya Turkey for the week that was November 10 through 13th, 2020.  Hope you enjoyed this week’s abbreviated posting and I will be back with more next week.

Please do keep your questions and comments coming by typing them into the “Join the Discussion” box below.  They are eXtremely helpful and meaningful to both Christine and myself and MUCH appreciated.  Thanks!

-Wayne