Oh Mr. Gee; You are SUCH a Smmoooooth Operator! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update June 6-10, 2020

Naval Yachts is a beehive of activity this past week with a big push for launching two other boats in the shipyard.  One particularly exciting one for Naval is the the first GreeNaval boat to be launched, their GN60 all aluminium 18m/60ft hybrid electric powerboat whose build began about three years ago just before Möbius.  The second boat is a complete refit inside and out of an all steel 16m/54ft sailboat originally built in the 1980’s.  Unfortunately this means that most of Team Möbius members have been called on to work on these two boats as they are both due to launch by the end of this month but hopefully they will return soon and progress can resume on our already long delayed launch.

However the remaining Team Möbius members are literally working overtime and weekends so progress on XPM78-01 Möbius is still being made so I have lots for this week’s Show & Tell progress update so let’s jump right into all that.

HOUSE BATTERIES:

IMG_20200706_093954Our Lead Sparkie aka Electrician Hilmi had Selim assisting him with pulling some more cables and wires such as these huge cables which connect the 24 FireFly Carbon Foam L15+ batteries to the Main DC Distribution Box seen here and where you may recall they left off last week.
XPM 6S4P House BatteryThe overall House Battery system is shown here and consists of four individual “battery banks” formed by connecting six of the 4V @ 450Ah FireFly Carbon Foam batteries together in Series, Positive to Neg, which is abbreviated as 6S in electro-speak. 
MVIMG_20200706_125454And here is what 6S looks like in reality when six 4V @ 450Ah FireFly batteries are connected in Series. 


* NOTE: If you look closely at this photo (click to enlarge) each of these FireFly L15+ batteries are actually TWO 2V cells inside of one case.  This is a very smart way to do things because by simply changing how those black covered copper bars are connected, each cell can be either 2V @ 900Ah OR 4V @ 450Ah, your choice.  We are choosing to configure each L15+ as you see here so I will always refer to each L15+ as a 4V @ 450Ah battery .


** TINY TECH TALK (feel free to skip over if not interested)

Series vs Parallel connections:

Each of these four 6S banks are subsequently  connected in Parallel, Positive to Positive, Neg to Neg, abbreviated as 4P so the total House Battery is 6S4P:

  • 6S = 4V x 6 = 24Volts @ 450Ah
  • 6S4P = 4 x 450Ah = 1800Ah @ 24V

When connecting batteries in Series the VOLTS of each battery are added together while the amps stay the same so each 6S bank is

  • 6 x 4V cells = 24V @ 450Ah.

As per the House Battery schematic above, the four 6S banks are then connected together in Parallel or 4P where the AMPS are now cumulative and the Volts stay the same so the total House Bank is abbreviated 6S4P and totals 4 x 450Ah = 1800Ah @ 24V.  Volts x Amps = Watts so that equates to 43.2kW aka a LOT!

Protecting Wires vs Consumers:

Fuses and circuit breakers can be used for two very different purposes depending on WHERE in the circuit they are installed.  if they are installed at the very beginning of the power SOURCE such as a battery or inverter, then they are protecting the WIRE from what is known as Overcurrent Protection.  If the fuse is instead installed close to where the consumer or appliance is connected then they are protecting the Consumer/Appliance.  It is possible to have one Fuse/Circuit breaker do both by installing it at the very beginning of the circuit aka power source but this means that the amps would need to be the SAME for both the total amps carried by the wire AND the total amps required by the consumer.  Therefore  this only works in the case where the whole circuit is serving just one individual consumer so that the amperage rating of the fuse matches both the limits for protecting the wire and protecting the consumer.


IMG_20200706_152526Putting all that theory into practice, let’s take a look at the case of fuses used for Overcurrent Protection of the batteries and their cables.  In this photo you can see that Hilmi and Selim have installed these large T-class fuses directly to the Positive output of this 6S bank using a thick copper flat bar. 

The batteries are the very beginning of the circuit so these fuses are being used for Overcurrent Protection of each Red 120mm2 / 5/0 AWG cable.  If as is often done when wiring batteries, no fuse is used and the Red cable is connected direct to the Positive battery post then there would be NO protection of that cable as it makes it way from the battery to the Positive Bus Bar inside the Main DC Distribution Panel. 
With the potential of 24V @ 450Ah a short circuit on this positive battery cable would be VERY bad and a fire all but guaranteed.  Hence we use Overcurrent Protection on all our wires and cables. 

This adds a degree of expense and complexity but when Safety is involved all other factors take a back seat.


AFT DECK WINCH:

IMG_20200707_100821Back in the Workshop looking up at the ceiling right behind the end of the Engine Room Enclosure, we find another job that Hilmi and Selim completed this week by connecting the 24V power cables to the big Lewmar EVO65 winch up on the Aft Deck.  This winch will get quite a workout as it is how we lift the Tender off and on the Aft Deck and we’ll cover that more in the coming weeks as the Davit Arch gets built.

IMG_20200707_100805As you can see, the motor and gearbox assembly tuck up nicely in this space which will be even more protected with the AlucoBond ceiling panels are put in place.

N2K NETWORK & MONITORING:

IMG_20200709_181958On the Starboard/Right side opposite the Winch Hilmi has mounted this Junction box to house some of the connections of the wiring in the Workshop for some of the 24V consumers such as the Maretron Black Boxes and Workshop lights.

Every wire labelled at both ends of course.
IMG_20200709_181954Zooming out a bit to get the bigger picture you can see how this newest junction box sets nicely up in the boxed corners that wrap all the way around the perimeter of the Workshop and how well that beautify big overhead hatch brings in all the light and fresh air.  The large rectangular AL bracket will soon have the DC Distribution Panel mounted to it and all those large Red/Black/Yellow/Green cables will go in their to connect up to the Positive and Neg bus bars, circuit breakers and fuses.
IMG_20200707_111642Speaking of which, that DC Distribution Panel for the Workshop showed up this week so we now have all three of these Distribution Panels, two of which you’ve seen in previous weeks with one up in the Forepeak and the Main one down in the Basement.
IMG_20200707_111716All the cable glands have been pre-installed for all those cables you saw in the photo above and keeps each cable both securely mounted with a waterproof connection.  You will be seeing more of this panel as it gets mounted inside the Workshop and Hilmi starts connecting all the cables, wires, fuses and circuit breakers.
IMG_20200709_182005Panning to the Left to this area above the Fuel Manifolds, these are some of the Maretron BB’s and one of the bluish multi-port N2K blocks on the far Right where the N2K backbone connects with the larger Blue cables such as the one visible on the far Right.  The small white wires are coming from the various Maretron sensors for things like temperature, pressure, fuel flow, WIF Water in Fuel, etc..

TRANSDUCERS:

IMG_20200710_134843Making a nice transition from electrical to aluminium “hotworks”, I finished up the design for this fairing block for the Aft Depth and Bottom Discriminating sounder and Uğur transformed it to solid 30mm thick aluminium in literally minutes.

The Black plastic transducer I’m holding is a Furuno 520-5PSD Bottom Discriminating Sounder which connects to a dedicated Furuno BBDS1 Black Box and then
BBDS screen shot 1sends the data and graphics like this out via Ethernet  cable to our boat computers and the TimeZero navigation software.  These sounders are most commonly used by commercial fishermen but having all this detailed information about the contours and materials below us is eXtremely valuable to us for checking out the best anchorage spots.
While very powerful, these BD transducers are very sensitive so they need to be well protected where they are exposed on the bottom of our hull from debris and possible groundings.  Strangely enough bubbles are the biggest “enemy” in terms of getting maximum performance from this and any depth transducer as they interrupt the pulsed sonar signals being sent and received by the transducer. 


IMG_20200710_151111This boat-like shape helps accomplish all these tasks; protects the transducer and smooths out the water flowing over the bottom surface of the transducer.


IMG_20200710_151105Equally critical is having the bottom surface of the transducer being parallel with the waterline so that the sonar signals are pointing straight down so we tacked the front end to the place on the hull we had strategically chosen and then used the laser level to get the bottom surface eXactly parallel with the “ground”.
IMG_20200710_151118Even though we had chosen a spot on the hull that was relatively flat there was still a good sized gap at the Aft end where the bottom plates start their sweeping curves up into the prop tunnel.
IMG_20200710_170514However it only took Uğur minutes to quickly cut some small triangular shapes of 5mm AL plate to fill that gap and then start laying down the first passes of weld to make this all integral to the hull.


Uğur will lay down at least one more bead of weld and then we will grind the block to an even more hydrodynamic shape and finish it up with epoxy fairing putty when we are prepping the bottom for the epoxy primer preceding application of the silicone base InterSleek 1100SR Foul Release bottom paint we are going to use.


IMG_20200710_170521One additional detail we designed in for an extra bit of safety with anything that is a penetration of the hull is that I had Uğur weld in a matching boat shaped piece of 5mm thick plate to the top of this 30mm thick boat shaped block before he tacked the whole block to the hull where it touches on the far Left/Forward end.  Click to enlarge this or any photo to see this 5mm plate and then the thicker 10mm hull plate above it.

Mr. Gee Mounting System

Gardner & Nogva mounts screen shotIn last week’s Update I outlined the design I came up with for mounting the Gardner and the Nogva to the beds in the Engine room using large anti-vibration mounting “feet”.  This week I finished up those design and construction drawings and Uğur got busy the brackets for Mr. Gee’s four “feet” and the two for his best buddy the Red Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox.


For the front Gardner mounts we need to extend or widen the inside of the Engine Beds a bit where the motor mount feet attach and for the Nogva feet we need to add an underhanging mounting bracket to the beds on both sides.



IMG_20200706_121354To help with your orientation in the real world, here is a shot standing up on the Aft Deck looking straight down into the Engine Room.  The two long parallel Mounting Beds you see in the rendering above are what you see here running from top to bottom in this photo.  Stern is at the top here so that is the Aft end of the Engine Room Enclosure at the top of this photo and out of sight at the bottom is the WT Bulkhead with the Guest Cabin on the other side.  Two large transverse Frames # 18 & 19 rare what you see spanning across between the two beds. 
IMG_20200706_124609Inside the ER looking Aft I’ve been busy laying out the exact locations for the mounts.  Getting the location of these engine and CPP mounts eXactly correct is eXtremely critical to the overall performance of the propulsion system so even though I’ve modeled every component very precisely in Fusion 360 3D modeler, I double, triple check all the numbers and geometry using independent hand sketches and pulling off real world measurements with tape measures, laser levels and machinist squares and then transferring this all to the aluminium with labels and lines on the masking tape I’ve put down along the beds.


The red flange halves up at the top are the zero reference or base plane that I have used for all my models and measurements as this 2 part flange is where the prop shaft connects to the output flange shaft of the Nogva CPP Gearbox.  When it comes time to align these mating flanges we have to get them to be less than 0.002”/0.05mm.  For reference a human hair is about 0.07mm in diameter so we don’t have much room for error when it comes time to align the Engine/Gearbox with the propeller flange.


IMG_20200707_101506Uğur has cut all the 25mm / 1” thick AL plates to size and prepped them for full penetration welds with the large 45 degree chamfers to form a deep V gulley for his MIG welding passes.
IMG_20200706_164722I really enjoy working so closely with Uğur and with all the modeling, measuring and marking done and all the plates cut and prepped time now for Uğur to start tacking them in place.

For orientation, the Door into the ER in the upper Left corner and the angled walls of the ER point to the Stern which is on the far Left.
IMG_20200706_181959The aft most mount for the Nogva Gearbox required this stringer be cut away where the mounting bracket plates will be and to provide enough room for the MIG gun to access.  New stringer plate will be welded back in again after the mounts are all done.
IMG_20200707_101546At the opposite front end, the supports for the bed extension required these slots be cut in the stringer under the 25mm thick Mounting Beds.
IMG_20200707_112605With all the interfering stringers cut away and slotted, Uğur could start tacking in the mounting plates starting with this vertical brace for the Stbd/Right Nogva Gearbox undermount and get it perfectly lined up with the reference lines I’ve marked on the bed surfaces.
IMG_20200707_122929He soon has both vertical braces tacked in place.
IMG_20200707_122936and then tacks in the horizontal base mounting plate.  My hand will give you a sense of size and scale.  Mr. Gee weighs in as a svelte 1400kg/3100lbs and the Nogva CPP adds about another 250kg/550lbs so these mounts need to stand up to several decades of support for over 17-1800kg / 3750-4000lbs of vibrating propulsion goodness so I am over engineering these beyond even my usual eXtremes. 


BTW, Mass is also a big help in reducing vibration and noise so there is that added benefit as well.


IMG_20200707_155825At the front end of the beds this Stbd/Right side bed extension is also now all tacked up and perfectly leveled ready for one last check with the laser level and straight edges before final welding begins.
IMG_20200707_155902Soon all four mounts, none needed for the two in the middle, are all tacked up, checked and ready for welding.
IMG_20200709_162002Front Bed eXtensions fully welded ready to be ground flat and flush.
IMG_20200709_182107As are the rear two undermounts with the stringer plates now added back in.
IMG_20200709_182553And here is a Birds-eye view looking down through the big ER Hatch on the Aft Deck.
IMG_20200709_174037Meanwhile, one floor up in the “Fitting Room” in my Workshop, I’ve been busy getting Mr. Gee’s new mounting brackets which we finished building last week, all fitted and installed on Mr. Gee himself as we prep for the big day of lowering him into his new home in the ER onboard Möbius.


These are the Aft two mounts that sit in the middle of the ER Beds.  The huge flywheel is also being prepped to mount to those six bolts on the end of the Crankshaft.


IMG_20200709_175325Seen from the front side and with the anti-vibration “feet” in place, this is what the finished Aft Mounts look like.
IMG_20200709_175339Front Right mounting bracket and foot test fit and good for final torqueing.
IMG_20200709_174104On the Front Left mounting bracket I have incorporated this extended base plate where I will soon be mounting the big Jabsco sea water impeller pump that provides all the cool seawater to flow through the heat exchangers for the engine coolant, engine oil and Nogva Gearbox oil before exiting out via the wet exhaust system and back into the seal. 
IMG_20200709_174112In the photo above, the PTO or Power Take Off drive can be seen on the far Left here and then viewed through the two holes in the vertical mount brackets.  I’ll be making up a SS drive shaft that will attach to that PTO end and go through those two holes in the mount and then be attached to the shaft of the Jabsco pump.  Should make for a very robust and reliable drive setup for this critical pump.

Mr. Gee’s FLYWHEEL;

IMG_20200707_124453Mr. Gee’s feet were not the only thing I’ve been massaging this week, I also finally made the time to finish prepping the purposely “obese” flywheel option that Michael at Gardner Marine Diesel kindly provided for us.  This mass helps to further even out the legendary eXtreme smoothness of all low revving Gardner 6LXB engines and make Mr. Gee a real smooth operator to quote Sade Adu’s great song.
IMG_20200707_124456Many months ago I had sent this flywheel out to the CNC Machine shop next door to have that recess with the 8 M-12 threaded holes machined and now I needed to remove these no longer needed bolts and bearings that are used for mounting a traditional Gardner gearbox.
IMG_20200707_155939The outer circumference of the Flywheel also serves a critical function by having these precise marks that are used for setting the timing of the fuel injection pump.  There are three sets of these precision marks and this one is for setting the injection timing of #1 cylinder.  I have filled these stamped in marks with fluorescent Green paint to help make them easier to see through the timing window in the outer aluminium Flywheel bell housing.
IMG_20200709_155312I sanded these areas down to leave the Green paint just filling up the letters and masked them off before spraying on the primer and topcoats.
IMG_20200707_184950As always, all the time in painting comes from the prep work so after months of that it only took a few minutes to spray on the first coat of primer.
IMG_20200708_183520Followed the next day by the final topcoat of aluminium paint. 


A bit eXcessive for an item that will never see the light of day?  Perhaps, but with our last boat having been all steel and Neil Young’s refrain of “Rust never sleeps” echoing in my head, I try to do anything I can to prevent rust happening ANYWHERE on my beloved new boat Möbius!  Call me crazy if you like, you’d be in the majority, but I’m a very happy and rust free nutcase!


IMG_20200707_165905My anti-rust fetish had me take the time to sand blast the six anti-vibration feet so I could paint them while I had my spray gun out and the aluminium silicone paint mixed up,
IMG_20200707_184944And shot them at the same time I was shooting the Flywheel so they are now all ready for installation.
IMG_20200709_155320Final step was to insert this aluminium SAE14 Centamax 1600 drive plate into that recess I pointed out earlier and torque down the eight hardened M-12 bolts.
CentaMax 1600 rubber insertWhen it is time to connect the Gardner to the Nogva Gearbox, this rubber flex drive which is bolted to the input shaft of the Nogva, will slide snugly into all those matching U shaped grooves in the AL drive plate that is now bolted to Mr. Gee’s Flywheel.  This is one more very significant component helping to make Mr. Gee such an eXtremely smooooooooth operator.

This is Exhausting!


IMG_20200708_184928The last bit of TLC for Mr. Gee was getting these stainless steel flexible exhaust bellows machined and welded so we can start installing the Halyard exhaust system.  These SS woven mesh connectors work really well by absorbing any vibration or movement between the Gardner engine and the dry stack SS pipes running up and over the Gardner on their way to the Halyard Combi Silencer/Separator.

The round SS flange faces up and this is where the first vertical dry stack Halyard pipe attaches.
IMG_20200708_184950And the bottom square flange bolts to Mr. Gee’s exhaust manifold.  You will be seeing much more of this once we start installing the Halyard exhaust system later this month.

Why Drop Your Drawers When You Can SLlllllliiiiiiiiide Them Instead?

IMG_20200706_140238We kept dancing to Sade’s Smooth Operator song throughout the week and that certainly included all the work that Omur and Selim were doing in the Main Cabin and the Galley.

IMG_20200706_094259Omur continued installing all the beautiful Rosewood drawers in the Master Bed Platform with their super smooth operating Blum drawer slides.


IMG_20200706_125054As you may notice, our Chippies aka Cabinetmakers, went a bit overboard last year when they started building the first drawers for XPM78-01 Möbius and made EVERY surface out of Ro$ewood so my pocketbook and I needed to reign them in a bit and use the very nicely contrasting Beech for the insides and undersides and unseeable surfaces of all the rest of the drawers and drawers they subsequently made.

But as you are seeing here in the Master Cabin, all the drawers in the King Bed Platform are Rosewood throughout.
IMG_20200706_125130All the other drawers and doors in the Master Cabin and throughout the rest of the boat have this very lovely contrast of colour and grain between the dark swirling Rosewood and the honey coloured Beech.  Thee upper four drawers in this Bureau of Drawers beside the Master Bed Platform show this well. 


The upper four are slide out drawers whereas the bottom four where the hull curves in and makes them narrower have fold down doors.  The outer faces will soon receive their Gray/Green leather covered fronts.


IMG_20200706_125143I covered these AbFab Blum bottom mounted drawer slides ad nauseum last week so I’ll leave you to go check that out if you’d like and just point out that this is a good shot at the underside of one of the Bureau drawers to show how these slides and their cushioned auto-close mounts work.
IMG_20200706_140215and here is an interior shot of one of the sliders in one of the bed platform drawers.
IMG_20200706_164425Looking rearward to the stairs leading up to the SuperSalon, these are the six drawers along the Starboard/Right side of the Master Bed Platform.
IMG_20200707_114243And these are the five drawers on the forward facing end of the Bed Platform.
IMG_20200706_182249Last 2 drawers in the Master Cabin are the two Omur in front of Omur located underneath the Vanity Sink at the very front end of this Cabin. 
IMG_20200709_101019Omur soon has both drawers all mounted as well s the door on the Medicine Cabinet above the sink.
IMG_20200709_101103The Rosewood doors along that Starboard side open up into very large storage shelves with hanging lockers and the Washing Machine behind what will soon be mounted Green/Gray leather covered drawers above the BHL Handhold.
IMG_20200709_101124Difficult to fit it all into one photo but this shot standing in front of the Vanity sink provides this perspective looking down those doors on the far Left and along the Bureau of Drawers and the Bed Platform on your way to the hanging locker on the Left just before you start up the stairs to the SuperSalon.
IMG_20200710_182648Speaking of which this view looking straight down those stairs from the SuperSalon lets us see that Omur has also now installed all the solid Rosewood nosing on each of these stair treads.
IMG_20200707_123205The solid Rosewood nosing and intake air grills for each of the stair treads came back from the Finishing Shop with their multiple coats of PU varnish all rubbed out to a beautiful matt sheen.
IMG_20200708_101626Omur soon had these all fully installed and awaiting the installation of the final flooring which will be planks of click-lock high end vinyl.

MAIN HELM STATION:

IMG_20200710_130839Upstairs Omur and Selim continued to make good progress installing the Main Helm Station which we saw them begin the previous week.  The hinged Dashboard is now back from the Upholstery Shop along with the mounting panel for the two 19” touch screens and the cut-outs for the switch panels are in the angled wall on the Right side of the Helm Chair.
IMG_20200708_132504I was finally able to get a photo of Sinan our Mater Upholsterer standing beside the latest round of ceiling panels for Möbius as well as the three Black Leather covered Dashboard pieces.
IMG_20200710_182735This is the basic layout that Captain Christine has come up with and is now in place.  Kobelt Throttle/Pitch control levers bottom Right, Furuno Jog Lever to its Left and then the Gray cover is hiding the Furuno 711C AutoPilot Head.


Above the Jog Lever is the Maxwell Windlass Chain Up/Down switch with the round Kobelt Pitch Angle gauge to its Right and the ACR Pan/Tilt Searchlight control in the Upper Right corner.  The empty hole beside is waiting to be filled by the Vetus Bow Thruster Joystick that has not yet arrived.


IMG_20200710_182757The hole on the far Left corner will have a smooth radius ring on it and will allow the Standard Horizon RAM4 VHF mic cord to coil up in the space below.

Vertically mounted on the Right wall is the Nogva Clutch & PTO control switches and the empty rectangular cut-outs will soon have the switch board mounted to control all the exterior flood/search lights and the High Water Bilge controls system.
Kobelt 7176 Walk About RemoteUp on top of the Right side angled wall, that Black Kobelt panel is the Kobelt control station to give control to either the Main or the Flybridge Helms OR give control to this Kobelt 7176 WalkAbout Controller which we are eXtremely eXcited to try out soon.  This is a corded remote control which can plug into a receptacle here at the Main Helm or up in the SkyBridge Helm and the 10m/33ft cord then allows us to “walk about” almost from stem to stern with this remote.  It is eXtremely multi-functional as the two levers on the sides control the Pitch of the prop and Throttle of the Gardner and then up on top we can control the rudder, the bow thruster and the CPP Clutch.  With this in hand we can pretty much control the whole boat while standing anywhere on the boat from the very aft end of the Swim Platform to up on the Bow.
MVIMG_20200710_182952In addition to giving you an overview of the whole front end of the SuperSalon and the Main Helm, all those wires hanging down from the ceiling indicate that Hilmi and Selim have been here putting in all the power cables for the LED lights overhead.
IMG_20200710_182741Most of all though, Christine and I are already fantasizing about sitting in our super comfy Llebroc Helm Chair up here and gazing out through these 360 degrees of windows as we head out towards our next great destination. 

Come on Team Möbius, we are counting on you to get us there ASAP!

SuperSalon gets Superer!

IMG_20200708_133223It is a hard area to photograph well but the “doghouse” overtop of the Entryway from the Aft Deck into the SuperSalon is shaping up very nicely thanks to Ömür’s hard work.


This shot is looking straight up while standing on the Entryway Stairs.  Omur now has the very nicely done Rosewood Hatch liner installed and Sinan has finished the first of the intricate snap in White leather covered ceiling panels on the Right here.  More to follow soon.


IMG_20200708_133238Here is a different perspective on that same area looking in through the Entryway door on the Aft Deck.  The Black Corner Box running across the upper ceiling area will have a snap In/Out panel to give us access to the various electronic gadgets that will live inside.

The SkyBridge is on the other side of the far right side here and …….
IMG_20200708_133251…… if I now climb up to the SkyBridge you can see this same Hatch liner from up here and get better oriented.
IMG_20200708_133259Walking a few steps forward in the SkyBridge and looking back at this same Hatch you can see where the SkyBridge Helm Chair will set in that space to the Left of the Hatch.  We have oriented this Hatch lid like this to make it easy for us to pass things back and forth from the Galley and the SkyBridge and to make it easy for us to talk back and forth when we are in these two areas.

GALLEY:

IMG_20200708_132310Can you guess where these three little drawers are bound for?
IMG_20200710_093451Well, I guess the heading of this section makes that easy to guess that they go HERE on the “peninsula” in the Galley that runs parallel with the walkway as you come down the stairs from the Entryway door.

One of the main themes Christine and I prioritized as we worked through the design of XPM78-01 Möbius is what we refer to as “Diversity” by which we mean having a lot of different options for different aspects and areas onboard.  in the case of the Galley that means a lot of diversity of size and shapes of drawers and doors so have a look around and see how this design diversity is manifesting itself in the Galley.


BTW, the tall skinny area in the middle of this set of different sized drawers will also be a pull out “drawer” that has no sides and just a series of shelves to store things like spices and condiments and utensils that you can easily access from the side.


IMG_20200710_093502Drawer Diversity continues over here on this set of drawers on the Window side of the Galley countertops forward of the double sink.
IMG_20200710_093508And yet more different sizes and shapes of drawers here on the other “peninsula” running along the back of the Dining Settee on the other side.
IMG_20200709_101254A bit difficult to see through all the construction but you can see how all the Garages atop the Turquoise marble countertops are also different sizes and depths for yet more diversity of our storage.  Our hope is that having all these different options will allow us to optimize all these storage areas and enable us to find the Goldilocks just right spot for everything we want to store in our Galley.
IMG_20200708_183744Also eXciting for us to see the big double sink be permanently set into the marble countertop.  And yes we heard all your questions and recommendations for a undermounted sink instead and we may well agree with you for the next boat, but we are very happy with this top mount and thing it will work well for us.


IMG_20200709_100759The large main faucet has a removable spray head with a very effective magnetic holder to keep it in place when not being used.  The smaller faucet on the far Right is just for cold drinking water which comes from its own 150 Liter tank that is completely independent of all other water tanks for an extra bit of safety should it ever happen that all six of our integral water tanks should be somehow contaminated. 
Highly unlikely as they are all filled from our 150L / 40 USG per hour Delfin Watermaker, but just in case ………………


Whew!  Even when shorthanded the rest of Team Möbius still makes great progress and we get closer and closer to Launch Date!

Oh, and one last bit or eXciting news, look what we just received!

Certificate of British Registry in Jersey for Möbius address blurred outHoly Pinocchio!

It is NOT a Fake News lie that XPM78-01 Möbius is now a “real boy” as she is fully and officially registered in Jersey and the British Ship Registry! 

I realise that this might seem like “just a piece of paper” to many but to us this is such a big milestone that makes our dreamboat seem all the more real and tantalizingly close.


Thanks as always for joining us on this grand adventure and PLEASE add your questions, comments and suggestions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Till next week, same time, same Bat station this is your cub reporter Wayne and Christine’s Loving Owners Representative signing off.

-Wayne

Tech Talk: XPM78 Möbius Electrical System Overview

Tech Talk: XPM78 Möbius Electrical System Overview

This is the first of the Tech Talk style of articles I promised in THIS previous posting. Many of you have been asking for a more in depth and technical look at the What, Why and How of all the various major systems required for an XPM boat such as Möbius. And not to worry, I will continue to do the weekly progress updates and then as my time permits, I will also post these Tech Talks for a bit of a change of pace and a different look at these boats.

Note that there is a tag in the blog for Tech Talks so you can filter on this whenever you want to have just these articles show up on your screen.  These Tech Talk articles will also be a bit different in that I will update them if things change or there are other additions or edits to improve them so much like your author here, these will be a continuous work in progress.

As with all my writing on the Möbius.World blog please keep in mind that the context for all my writing and all our decisions is always and only, what is “just right, just for us” as we are living on our all aluminium XPM78 eXtreme eXploration Passage Maker. As in our past boats, this will be Christine and my full time home as we double-hand** our way around the world’s most remote locations at all latitudes from polar to equatorial with equally eXtreme degrees of Safety, Comfort, Efficiency and Low Maintenance.

** We were both formerly single handed sailors until we met, fell in love and married in our 60’s and are now about to set off “double handing” our way around the world on our new XPM78 Möbius.

If you would like to learn more about our use case THIS previous post has the full explanation.

And before I go any further please keep the following in mind about all these Tech Talk articles:

  • These are NOT recommendations on what YOU or any other boat owners should do or what equipment you should buy.
  • I am NOT suggesting that our choices are “the best” I merely hope to explain OUR (Christine and my) logic and why we believe that these are the Goldilocks “just right, just for us” choices in the design, installation and equipment aboard XPM78-01 Möbius.
  • I am NOT an expert nor do I have any qualifications or certifications in any of these topics and while we have enlisted the help of true experts, engineers, designers and naval architects throughout the design and build process please only use the information provided in these Tech Talks as additional information to assist you in developing YOUR OWN opinions, ideas and designs.

· These Tech Talk articles are intended to generate lots of questions, suggestions, and ideas. I hope to learn as much as you do by writing these Tech Talks and more so by responding to your comments and provoking more good discussions.

· In doing so we can all contribute to the wealth of information and knowledge already out there for all of us to access and learn from. Indeed this is the primary purpose and value of these articles, so don’t be shy and please add your contributions to the “Join the Discussion” box below. I only ask that you keep the above notes in mind and of course keep the discussion respectful, polite and on topic as you always have.

SCEM boxAs mentioned in our use case overview and in many previous posts, we have four fundamental principles or priorities which we have used throughout the entire design and build process to guide our decisions. These are Safety, Comfort, Efficiency & Maintenance. We strive to keep the first three as high as possible and the last one, Maintenance, as low as possible. I will therefore add a “SCEM Review” section for each system’s Tech Talk and summarise how each system contributes to each of these fundamental priorities and principles.


All right, with all that out of the way, lets dive into the details of the What, Why and How of the XPM Electrical System.

ELECTRICAL SYSTEM OVERVIEW

XPM Electrical System

The Electrical System on our new boat can best be described as a DC Battery Based electrical system meaning that ALL of the electrical power consumers on the boat, both AC and DC, get their power from the large 24 volt “house” battery bank. This is in contrast with many other boats that could be characterized as “AC Based” boats because their systems are optimized for AC inputs from onboard generators and shore power. Both models work well and the question is not which system is “best” but which system is best for a given boat, owner and use case.

Given that by design and use case there is no generator onboard Möbius and shore power is rarely available as we live on anchor almost all the time, a DC Battery Based boat is the just right, just for us solution.

Our large 24 volt 1350Ah battery bank is charged from either the +5kW bank of 14 solar panels and/or via the two large alternators, 250A @ 24V each, 12kW total, driven off the main engine when on passage.

This is very much a “world boat” so all four of the most common voltages are available onboard at all times. 24V DC and 220V 50Hz AC are the primary voltages we use and 12V DC and 120V 60Hz AC outlets are located throughout the boat as well for devices and guests which require these voltages

There will be shore power connectors at the front and rear for those infrequent occasions when the boat is hauled out for maintenance or to leave for extended times for trips back to be with our three Grandkids and other family and friends. These shore power connections come aboard through a Victron Isolation Transformer primarily to ensure we have no connection from the boat to shore side grounding wires and gives us the significant advantage of being able to plug into any shoreside power from 100-240 Volts @ 50 – 60Hz.

BASIC ELECTRICAL SYSTEM COMPONENTS:

  • House Battery Bank: 18 FireFly Carbon Foam L15+ 450Ah @ 4V batteries connected in three 24V banks 6S3P (6 Serial 3 Parallel) = 1350Ah @ 24V = 32kWh
  • 220 Volt Inverter/Chargers:  3 Victron MultiPlus 24V 5000W 120A
  • 120V Inverters:  2 Victron MultiPlus 24V 3000W 70A
  • DC-DC converters Victron Orion 24V to 12V 70A
  • Engine Alternators:  2 Electrodyne 24V @ 250A = 6kW each = 12kW total output.
    • Both with remote rectifiers and remote “smart regulators”
  • Battery Monitor: Victron BMV 712s for monitoring each of the 3 battery banks and the overall DC electrical system. 
    • Augmented with Maretron monitoring
  • Solar Panels: 14 each 96 cell 360W = 5.04kW peak total
  • MPPT Controllers:  14 Victron SmartSolar 100/30 MPPT controllers
    • one per solar panel
  • Engine Start Battery:  2 FireFly G31 110Ah Carbon Foam batteries in series 110Ah @ 24V

I hope you have found this first of my Tech Talk articles to be of some value and I would be most appreciative of any and all comments and suggestions on ways I can improve them. With this Electrical System Overview done I will next dive into each of this system’s components and I think it is appropriate to start with the true center of or Electrical System; the House Bank batteries and then progress through each of our Charging Sources which are solar and engine alternators.

Please add your comments, questions and ideas in the “Join the Discussion” box below each post.

Thanks!

– Wayne

Tech Talk: XPM78 Möbius Electrical System Overview

XPM Möbius Tech Talks: What, Why and How of all the systems aboard XPM78-01 mv Möbius

mobius word newThis is an advanced notice that I a going to start posting some new type of articles here on our Möbius.World blog which will be different from and in addition to the typical Weekly Update posts I do to cover the incredible work that Team Möbius does each week. I have previously posted some more technical articles like this about things like the overview of the the design and use case for our new boat and the one on Mr. Gee our Gardner 6LXB main engine and a few other such topics since we started this blog almost two years ago and with growing requests for these detailed technical explanatory type articles I will be doing my best to increase the frequency of these kinds of posts now..

These new articles will be different in that they will be “Tech Talks” where I can go into more detail on all the various systems on the XPM boats and explain my logic such as it is for the design of these systems, reasons for choosing the equipment we have and how these systems will be installed and maintained.  I will do my best to make these “as Show & Tell” as possible with illustrations and diagrams, and possibly some video versions, but by their nature these will be more text based explanations compared to the more visual orientation of the Weekly Progress Updates. Hopefully it will be a good contrast and combination for you and if not I’m counting on you to let me know!

It is also my hope that by separating these more explanatory and detailed technical discussions from the more visual Show & Tell type of Weekly Progress Updates, you will be able to more easily chose what suites you best. And I hope those of you who are interested in these deep dives into the technical aspects of the XPM boats will chime in with your comments and questions to help me cover the topics you are most interested in and provide the Goldilocks not too much, not too little type of content that you would value and which will provoke more discussion for all of us.

Before I go any further and as I will likely repeat several times in the articles to follow, let me be very clear about the context and conditions of these articles:

  • These are NOT recommendations on what YOU or any other boat owners should do or equipment you should buy.
  • I am NOT suggesting that our choices are “the best” I merely hope to explain OUR (Christine and my) logic and why we believe that these are the Goldilocks “just right, just for us” choices in the design, installation and equipment aboard XPM78-01 Möbius.
  • These articles are intended to generate lots of questions, suggestions, and ideas. Indeed this is the primary purpose and value of these articles, so don’t be shy! I only ask that you keep the above two notes in mind and of course keep the discussion respectful, polite and on topic.
  • Please keep in mind that the overriding context for ALL these articles, choices and equipment selection is for an XPM style of boat and use case which is an eXtreme eXploration Passage Maker for a crew of two, typically a couple who want to be able to go to remote locations on all latitudes from polar to equatorial with equally eXtreme degrees of Safety, Comfort, Efficiency and low maintenance and where the boat will be their full time or primary home.
  • I hope to learn as much as you do by writing these Tech Talks and more so by responding to your comments and provoking more good discussions. In doing so we can all contribute to the wealth of information and knowledge already out there for all of us to access and learn from.
  • Unlike the Weekly Progress Update articles I will edit these Tech Talk posts over time as decisions or equipment changes and as I get more information along the way. For these posts there will be two dates for each one, the date it was first published and the date it was last updated/edited.

I will create some new tags for these different type of postings to make your future searches more productive and right now my intent is to write articles on most of the following primary systems and topics:

  • ELECTRICAL

    • AC SYSTEM
    • DC SYSTEM
    • Batteries
    • Charging
    • Solar
    • NMEA
    • Lighting
    • Screens, Monitors, Displays
  • NAVIGATION

    • Charting
    • RADAR
    • AIS
    • Compass
    • DEPTH & SONAR
    • Onboard Computers
    • Portable Helm Station
  • BOAT MONITORING

    • Maretron System
    • Tank Levels
    • Temperatures
    • Electrical status
    • Alarms
    • Boat Data Logging
  • COMMUNICATIONS

    • VHF
    • SATELLITE
    • WiFi & CELLULAR
    • Networks
  • PROPULSION

    • Gardner main engine
    • Nogva CPP servo gearbox
    • Nogva CPP propeller
    • Propulsion Controls
    • Cooling
    • Wet Exhaust
  • STEERING

    • Steering controls
    • Hydraulic steering components
    • Auto Pilot
    • Jog Levers
    • Steering Back ups
    • Bow Thruster
  • STABILISATION

    • Paravanes
    • Flopper Stoppers
    • Rigging
  • HVAC

    • Heating
    • Ventilation
    • Air Conditioning
    • Engine Room venting
  • WATER

    • Fresh/Potable
    • Watermaker
    • Salt
    • Black
    • Gray
  • FUEL

    • Tanks, Filling & Venting
    • Filtering
    • Centrifuge Polishing (Alfa Laval)
    • Transferring
    • Hoses & Fittings
  • BILGES

    • Low volume
    • High volume
    • Emergency
  • FIRE & SAFETY

    • Fire extinguishing systems
    • Underwater maintenance
    • Drone
    • Exterior Lighting
    • Cameras
  • GALLEY

    • All electric cooking
    • Sinks
    • Refrigeration
    • Storage drawers & Garages
    • Outside Galley & BBQ
  • ANCHORING & GROUND TACKLE

    • Main anchor & Windlass
    • Stern & Kedging anchor
    • Ground Tackle
  • WORKSHOP

    • Tools
    • Equipment
  • BOAT DESIGN & PERFORMANCE

    • Hull Design
    • Stability
    • Handling Characteristics
    • Performance Expectations

Whew! Already a long list but if there are other large topics or systems you would like to have covered, please send me what you think I’ve missed in the “Join the Discussion” box below and I’ll do my best to add these to the list and cover as time permits.

And please note that this is NOT a promise that I will be able to write about all of the above or at least to do so fully but it is my intent to cover as many of these topics as fully as I can in all my “spare time” during the building of mv Möbius.

And NO I am NOT interested in or trying to write a book! We already have an author onboard who writes best selling books, also known by her nom de plume Christine Kling and aka Captain Christine and my Beautiful Bride so we’ve got the book writing aspect covered eXtremely well already thanks.

Looking forward to writing these Tech Talk articles and getting  your suggestions and ideas as these new discussions begin.

– Wayne