Let the Chips Fly!!  XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Dec. 9-14, 2019

Let the Chips Fly!! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Dec. 9-14, 2019

Another busy week here at Naval Yachts for all of Team Möbius as we ramp up for the final push to launch as early in the new year as possible.  It remains a labour of love for Christine and I but it certainly is all consuming of our time and attention.  This week saw progress in everything from CNC machining the new Tiller Arm now that the Rudder is pretty much finished and ready for installing in the hull to finishing the installation of the prop shaft tube into the hull, plumbing for the in-floor heating system, wiring and of course lots of cabinetry work.  It will take me awhile to get through it all for you so grab a beverage and a comfy seat and let’s go aboard Möbius and check it all out.

TILLER ARM

 IMG_20191209_133245Most of our work with Aluminium to date has been with large plates which are CNC cut to shape and pieced together to form the hull and superstructure.  However as you can see in this photo this hunk of aluminium beauty ain’t no plate! 


IMG_20191209_134155If I tell you that this 152 x 255 x 275mm (6” x 10” x 11”) and 30kg/66lbs block of solid aluminium is just one half of the part, can you guess what this is going to be?


That 150mm/6” long 25.4mm/1” precision ground threaded pin is specially hardened steel to easily withstand the eXtreme forces which can be exerted on it where the Heim Joint ends of the cylinders attach to the Tiller Arm body.  I ordered these and 2 spares from McMaster Carr and brought back with me from our recent trip to Florida.


Tiller Arm bodyA bit of a no brainer given the title of this section I guess!!  A Tiller Arm.

These two quick screen grabs show the design I came up with using Autodesk Fusion 360 which I must say is my all time favorite design and drawing software of all time and in my case that is a LONG time!


You can see how the right side is the second half I mentioned and those four large bolts clamp the Tiller Arm to the 127mm/5” Rudder Post with the 20mm key that goes in the slot on the left side main body.

Tiller Arm w cylinders Turning on some hidden components you can see how the two Kobelt 7080 bi directional hydraulic cylinders with a bore of 76mm/3” ID and stroke of 305mm/12” provide plenty of torque as they push/pull the Tiller Arm which in turn rotates our big rudder up to 45 degrees to each side.


eXcessively massive, time consuming and expensive?  Of course, this is an XPM! and the steering system is arguably the most important system on a passage maker so I’m delighted with such eXcess.


Each cylinder is connected to its own dedicated Kobelt/Accu-Steer HPU400 Hydraulic Power Unit.  Dennis and I worked extensively with the great engineers at Kobelt to come up with this eXtremely robust steering system.  We have designed it such that just one cylinder and one pump significantly exceed the steering requirements to safely steer the boat in even the most severe conditions. 


There will be controls at each Helm station to allow us to select either Steering A or Steering B and our SOP Standard Operating Procedures will be to alternate using A and B for a week or so to ensure both systems are fully operable and being used equally.  At any time for situations such as close quarter maneuvering we can have both pumps and both cylinders working at the same time which cuts our lock to lock rudder time in half.

In the unlikely event that both pumps and cylinders were to fail we then have a Kobelt 7005 manual hydraulic steering pump with wheel at the Main Helm.  And if all of that were to somehow fail we then have an emergency tiller which can manually control the rudder.

tasot_buildingBack to real time photos, the CNC machining is all happening in a building 2 blocks over from Naval Yachts here in the Antalya Free Zone at Tasot Waterjet Cutting Technology
IMG_20191211_154521_MPThey have a small warehouse filled with some of the most advanced metal cutting machines of every description and having the literally next door is one of the great advantages of building here in the Free Zone.

IMG_20191209_133729Here is the whole gang responsible for transforming my design into a very real aluminium Tiller Arm.  From right to left, Yigit our XPM Project Manager,  Hamdi Uysal CNC machinist, Ufuk Bekci Tasot Owner and Tuncay Mutlu Production Engineer


IMG_20191209_133256This is the 5 axis CNC machine in the middle of machining the body of the clamp block.
IMG_20191209_133302Closer view of the Clamp Body with one side finished and ready to be flipped over to machine the other side.
IMG_20191211_153749Hamdi proudly showing the finished Clamp Body.
IMG_20191211_153809IMG_20191211_153803One half done, now on to the Tiller Arm Body.
IMG_20191213_111224With one side of the main Tiller Arm body finished, roughing out the second side begins.  Easy to see why this is called “subtractive manufacturing”.  3D printing is the opposite “additive manufacturing”.
Here is a short little video I’ve put together to show you what this looks like in action.

I was too busy on Friday to get back to see the finished Tiller Arm body so I’ll show you that in next week’s update.


IMG_20191120_121849Meanwhile back at Naval Yachts, the Rudder is all finished and patiently waiting to be installed as Nihat and Uğur ae busy getting the 10mm thick walled 200mm ID Rudder Tube tacked in place as they prepare to insert the finished Rudder. 
Rudder Prop ghosted viewChoosing a few relevant layers in the 3D model and using “ghost” mode this quick render will help you see how the various pars such as Rudder, Prop, steering cylinders and Tiller Arm fit together.  This is in the aft end of the Workshop with the door out to the Swim Platform in the upper left.

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IMG_20191210_142908In reality mode here is the Rudder Post Tube now tacked in place and just sticking up above the Rudder Shelf.  Same Workshop to Swim Platform door on the upper left.  Next week when the Rudder Post Tube is fully welded in place you’ll see the Rudder post sticking up through this tube with the Jefa self aligning needle bearings top and bottom and the Tiller Arm on top.
IMG_20191210_142945Looking underneath the Rudder Shelf reveals the 25mm/1” thick AL brackets which tie the Rudder Post Tube to the stringers, frames and prop tunnel of the hull and make this all one integral hull assembly.
IMG_20191210_142926Limber Holes or ”Mouse Holes” in the corners where these tube braces will be welded to the hull plates ensures that any water which finds its way in here can easily flow to the lowest point and be removed by the bilge pump and not trapped in these compartments.

PROP SHAFT & LOG MOUNTING

IMG_20191210_102551You may recall from an update a few weeks ago that the machined Aluminium tube, the one with the holes in it here, which the Nogva CPP prop shaft runs inside of, had been fitted into the larger aluminium prop tube that is part of the hull which you can see running up to the top left corner here.

See something new though?

What’s that Orange stuff in that little stubby bit of pipe?
IMG_20191209_173634_MPAnd what might this bit of kit be that is on the floor just below the prop shaft tubes?
IMG_20191209_173935And what are they mixing up here?
IMG_20191209_173919Some of you will recognize this quite universally used Chockfast Orange which is a special 2 part compound which is pumped in fill voids between two parts and rather permanently fasten them together once it hardens.
IMG_20191209_173853After being thoroughly mixed with the hardener the syrupy Chockfast Orange is poured into the red tank you see in the photos above, the lid is bolted down and the tank is filled with compressed air.


IMG_20191209_173910Then a tube connects the bottom of the tank to the filler tube which is temporarily welded to the hole in the top of the hull’s prop shaft tube and the Chockfast flows into the 12mm/ 1/2’” space between the outside of the Nogva Prop Log tube and the larger inside diameter of the Hull’s larger welded in prop tube.
IMG_20191209_174036Up inside the Engine Room, the other end of the prop tubes which have been precisely locked into position with this clamping jig and a tube has been inserted into the pipe that has been temporarily installed where the two tubes have been sealed off to stop the Chockfast from leaking out.
IMG_20191209_174045A few minutes later the Chockfast has filled the entire void between the two tubes and exits out the tube.  Several cupful’s are collected to make sure any entrapped air escapes and then the valve on the Chockfast tank is turned off and we leave this to fully cure in the next 48 hours.  Once fully hardened the two tubes become essentially a single part and provides plenty of space for water to surround the spinning prop shaft at its center. 
IMG_20191213_171521With the Chockfast fully hardened the prop shaft was fitted again to double check the position of this red flange which will soon be bolted to the output flange of the Nogva CPP gearbox.

Where the prop shaft exits the prop log tube there will be a “dripless” seal that fits over the end of the prop tube and seals against the spinning prop shaft to keep all water where it belongs; in the sea and outside the boat! 
IMG_20191213_171525A close up view of the threaded push/pull Pitch rod which runs inside of the prop shaft.  This rod threads into the Nogva gear box and is moved fore and aft by the Pitch Control lever at each Helm.  As the rod moves fore/aft the four prop blades rotate in synch and changes the pitch to anything from neutral, forward or reverse and as more pitch is added the speed of the boat increases.  All a very simple and mechanical system which gives us the ultimate prop, one that is perfectly pitched for any condition.
IMG_20191210_102551At the propeller end of the prop tube, water exits out these holes drilled around the circumference of the machined end of the Nogva prop tube.

Next week the Cutlass Bearing which supports this aft end of the prop shaft will be press fit into place and the CPP prop and shaft assembly can be carefully slid in place for checking of the final fit as we prep for installing the Nogva CPP Servo gearbox.
ELECTRICK GRILL
IMG_20191212_161620One of the many items in that big crate you saw arriving from Florida last week was our Kenyan “Frontier” 220V electric grill that is part of our Outdoor Galley on the Aft Deck.  We no sooner took the box out of the crate than Nihat and Uğur whisked it away and cut in the opening for the grill in the Starboard/Right Vent Box.
IMG_20191212_161620Deciding to go all electric for this BBQ was part of our ability too make Möbius be a single fuel, all diesel boat.  The other big part of this was going with an internal diesel engine in our Tender and I’ll have more for you on all of that in the coming weeks.


All the top surfaces of these two Vent Boxes on the Aft Deck will be countertops, probably using some of the left over turquoise granite from the Galley countertops.  There will be a SS sink in the open space you see here in front of the grill.


IMG_20191212_104050Speaking of electrical, I only managed to catch a few shots of Hilmi and Okan’s progress with some of the wiring this week.  Okan was busy in the Basement prepping these cable trays to be mounted on the ceiling which will be used to support those huge 120 mm2 / 5/0000 AWG red and black cables.

PLUMBING

IMG_20191211_124838Cihan was also a busy boy this past week installing plumbing pieces for several different systems.

He has masterfully crafted these two manifolds for some of the Cold and Hot water systems for moving water from one of the six tanks to another as needed to adjust ballast as fuel is removed and others for getting water from the watermaker you saw last week, to each of these tanks.
IMG_20191211_124851He has done a beautiful job of insulating all of these to increase efficiency of the DHW Domestic Hot Water lines and also keep the Cold water lines from absorbing ambient heat in the Workshop when we are in hotter tropical climates.
IMG_20191213_122907Moving forward to the Basement, more of Cihan’s fine work this week was getting the dedicated Galley Water tank in place.  This is probably more “eXcess” as we can hold as much as 7100L/1875USG of potable fresh water in our six integral tanks in the hull and we have the 190L/hr / 50USG/hr Delfin watermaker.
However as you’ve read previously and often, we always design with our “Readiness for the Unexpected” in mind and this additional 200L/55 USG polypropylene Potable Water tank is one example.  We will treat this similar to the Day Tank for our diesel fuel by keeping it full at all times and it will be plumbed to an independent faucet at the Galley sink.

IMG_20191213_122942Wonder what that shiny item sitting atop the Water tank is?  Yet another bit of kit out of that crate from Florida, this is the manifolds for the three in-floor heating zones.  To my eyes it is a beautiful work of art in its own right and is almost a shame it is down in the Basement where not too many eyes will see it.  The top 3 red towers are flow meters which you adjust with the white knobs on the bottom.
IMG_20191213_171857After some discussion, Yigit, Cihan and I decided this would be the best location for these manifolds, secure against the WT Bulkhead with the Guest Cabin on the other side. 
Supply of hot water enters on the top right and goes out to each of the 3 in-floor zones from the bottom of the Red upper manifold and then returns through the three fittings under the White knobs and back to the Domestic Hot Water system on the bottom right.  Ball valves on all lines coming in and out and temperature gauges on both supply and return so I can monitor the difference.


IMG_20191213_123033Each zone has one of these 3 speed 1/25HP pumps on the supply side to keep the water circulating through the 15mm PEX lines embedded in the floors.
IMG_20191213_123002In the foreground on the left is a Watts mixing valve plumbed into the floor heating water system to help manage the lower temperature water needed for in-floor heating which wants to run between 30-500C/85-1200 F.

In the background is the Azel I-Link three zone Pump Controller which is controlled by individual temperature sensors embedded in each cabin floor.

I’ll have more to show you as Cihan progresses with the installation.

CABINETRY WORK:

IMG_20191209_121805_MPMy Beautiful Bride, aka Captain Christine is at the shipyard most days now and here she is going over the details for the cabinetry and fixtures in this Guest Cabin Head/Bathroom. 
IMG_20191210_172835Standing in the Guest Shower for this shot you can see that Omer has been practicing his cabinetmaking craft very well in this Head.  With the Guest Cabin serving as her Office the majority of the time and with this Head being so close to the SuperSalon entrance and the aft Workshop, it will likely get more use than the Head in our Master Cabin so worth making sure it has the Goldilocks touch of being “just right, just for us”.
IMG_20191211_103715Christine spent a LOT of time searching for this just right sink and finally found one and had it shipped to me in Cannes when I was helping out Naval at the boat show there back in October and I brought it back on the plane with me.

Raised platform in the back is where the VacuFlush toilet will rest at the Goldilocks height.
IMG_20191211_174158Up in the SuperSalon Omur and Selim continue to make great progress.  Here Omur is putting in the perimeter framing for the rigid foam insulation on each stair tread leading down into our Master Cabin.
IMG_20191211_174152All the floors have 40mm/1.6” thick rigid foam board which the 15mm PEX tubing is embedded into and then some of that light weight poplar 10mm marine plywood covers that and the edges of the plywood attach to these epoxy coated solid wood frames.
IMG_20191213_110030Opposite the stairs where Omur and Selim are working you can see how this white framing also provides the perfectly level foundation for all the cabinetry to mount to.
IMG_20191213_171747By week’s end the wall boards were being fitted and will give you, and us, a better sense of how this room will look. 


The large opening on the far right is for a 50” high def monitor which will serve double duty as both our primary entertainment screen for displaying movies, photos, web browsing, etc.  However it is also on a 3 axis mount which enables us to pull it out and rotate it forward where it is perfectly aligned for viewing charts and boat data from the Main Helm chair when underway.

The large vertical openings on the far left will soon house two Vitrifrigo 130L/35USG fridges with doors opening from the center.  The center cabinet is for two of Vitrifrigo’ s band new DRW70  70L/19 USG slide out drawer freezers which can double as fridges with a simple change of their thermostats.

IMG_20191213_110344Over in the Cabinetry Shop I happened to catch Omer as he was gluing up one of the Galley drawers and shot this sequence of shots for those of you who have been asking how the wood “biscuits” I’ve been mentioning work to align and strengthen the glued up wood joints.

You can see 2 biscuits with freshly applied glue on the right….
IMG_20191213_110413One of the drawer sides which has a matching grove for the biscuit is slid in place.
IMG_20191213_110553Same thing for the opposite side.
IMG_20191213_110713Two biscuits and some glue for the final drawer side.
IMG_20191213_110720_MPThanks to the ingenious biscuit power tool which cuts all these grooves everything lines up just right.  The biscuits are made from highly compressed wood fibres so as they soak up the glue they expand and make the joint even tighter and stronger.
IMG_20191213_110317Rinse and Repeat the process and this collection of glued up drawer carcases starts to form.  Once the glue dries plywood drawer bottoms slide into place and are glued and screwed in position to create very stable drawers which slide in and out on their ball bearing self closing slides with just a touch.

POWER!!


IMG_20191209_105220Remember that crate we build and filled with all sorts of parts and equipment that we were sourcing out of the US and arrived last Friday?  Uğur helped me open it up and unpack it all this week.
IMG_20191209_105352Literally hundreds of items inside from Milwaukee cordless tools for me to premium Belgium made pots and pans for Christine and then LOTS of parts for Möbius and they all made it on their flights from Miami to Antalya just fine.
IMG_20191209_115452Two of Möbius’ items whose arrival  we are most excited about are these two bright red beauties from Electrodyne.  I have been working closely with the fabulous people at Electrodyne Inc. for well over a year to have them build these eXtremely heavy duty 250A 24V alternators for us which combined will put out almost 14kW.  So when I say that we don’t have a generator onboard I guess that’s not entirely true?!

** WARNING:  mini Tech Talk Ahead!  Skip over if not interested

I’d known Electrodyne alternators since I was working as a HD construction mechanic in my youth and Electrodyne alternators were the ultimate choice for large construction and mining diggers, railroads, trucks, busses, emergency vehicles where they often ran 24/7 for weeks or months.  They are literally built like tanks and each one weighs 40kg/90 lbs! 

I’d initially worked with Pete Zinck until he retired early this year and turned things over to his Production Manager Dale Gould and who could not have been more helpful and responsive to my many Emails and requests.

What you are seeing in the photo above are two identical Electrodyne G250-24 models which are de-rated down to 250Amps @ 27.5V @ 3750RPM which would give each one a maximum output of almost 7kW (6.875) for a combined output of almost 14kW.  However I will make the serpentine pulley ratios such that their max speed will be about 3200-3400 RPM for even longer life.  Dale stripped these down for safer, and slightly lighter shipping and I have not had time to mount the HD steel wiring boxes which house all the wire connections you see here for the six large external direct AC output cables which then run over to the external rectifiers and regulators which I will mount outside the Engine Room with thermostatically controlled fans to ensure they are always running nice and cool and at maximum efficiency.  I’ll cover all that in the coming weeks as I get these alternators installed on Mr. Gee our Gardner 6LXB and wired into the electrical system.

I had a list of key features I wanted for our dual XPM alternators running off our single main engine and I knew that it was going to be a challenge to find a company that would build these so with my long past experiences with their alternators I turned to Electrodyne and sure enough they were able to built in all the features I wanted,   In addition to being rock solid, high output and lasting “forever”, perhaps the most significant features that I wanted were that they be brushless and I wanted them to have everything other than the rotating stator to be external.  No built in regulators and no rectifiers.  Why go to such extremes?   In a work; HEAT, which is the largest factor in shortening an alternators output and lifespan. Rectifiers can produce more than half the total heat within an alternator so by removing these and going with industrial grade 3 phase bridge rectifiers I can reduce the internal head of the alternator by more than half AND control the heat of the rectifier bridges outside the ER and with their own fans.   This also creates an alternator with only one moving part, the spinning rotor so MUCH better airflow through the alternator stator windings and rotor.  The Goldilocks alternator for an XPM; consistent high output with low heat and low maintenance. 

I will cover these Electrodyne beauties in much more detail in future posts here once I get them all assembled and installed but suffice it to say that I am VERY excited about getting these Electrodyne alternators installed and tested.  Equally as exciting are the WakeSpeed 500 Advanced Regulators that were also in this same crate of equipment we unpacked this week and will be controlling and managing our two mighty Electrodyne alternators. 

If this stuff interests you as much as it does me then please stay tuned and be sure to subscribe to the blog so you don’t miss any of the new articles as they go live.

OK, now back to our regular programming.

Mr. Gee Gets Naked!

Captain Christine is now working at the Naval Shipyard with me most days now as we make the final push to finish this build and bet Möbius and ourselves back were we belong; ON THE WATER!!

IMG_20191207_141759_MPAmongst her many jobs Christine has literally rolled up her sleeves, donned her HD latex gloves and become Mr. Gee’s personal degreaser!  Our Gardner 6LXB serial # is 196071 which means he emerged out of the Gardner and Sons building in Patricroft in Manchester England in February 1975 and was in constant use powering a tugboat in the Thames river everyday thereafter. 
After 45 years of such use we are giving Mr. Gee a serious bath to start his second life as our main engine in Möbius.  To do so we have removed every single part, nut, bolt and cotter pin and have now removed pretty much every bit of grease and guck that has accumulated over his glorious 45 year past.


IMG_20191207_163006With all the other duties I’ve unexpectedly taken on here along with the regular demands of building a new boat I’ve not been able to get as much time as I had expected to attend to Mr. Gee’s needs but I am contributing more of late and managed to get this massive chrome molly (chromium molybdenum steel) crankshaft all cleaned up and returned to its original shiny self.
20132710_10155688267755572_903598832_oThis is Michael Harrison, the CEO of Gardner Marine Diesel Engines who continues to keep the Gardner name alive and very well.  Michael was also the one who found Mr. Gee for us after a very long search for this completely original unrestored marine version 6LXB.


The Gardner 6LXB, and most Gardner engines for that matter are built with four primary building blocks:

  • Cast Aluminium Oil Pan
  • Cast aluminium Crankcase
  • Cast Iron Cylinder Block with pressed in dry liners
  • Dual cast iron heads

IMG_20191212_110343After one of several strip downs, I had reassembled all these major castings and had the exterior thoroughly sandblasted and then put on several coats of high temp silicone based primer. 

Now stripped down naked once again and ready for the bath of his lifetime, Hakan helped me drag the bare cast aluminium crankcase outside.
IMG_20191211_150746Armed with some super HD degreaser, lots of wire brushes and our newly acquired Bosch pressure washer, it was bath time!
IMG_20191212_110927I had spent the previous 3 days scrubbing every nook and cranny with the degreaser and wire brushes so this final pressure wash took us back down to virgin raw aluminium throughout.  I also wanted to be sure to blast out every oil gallery and hole to remove not only the old grease and grime but also any new particles that had climbed aboard during the sandblasting.
IMG_20191212_125617And here is the result, a VERY clean Mr. Gee!
IMG_20191212_125629This is the front end of the crankcase which will soon be filed with lots of sprockets and an eXtremely large double roller timing chain that drives everything from the camshaft to the PTO for one of those Electrodyne alternators to the water pump and fuel pump.
Whew!!  It is now late on Sunday night and I’m exhausted and so are you probably if you’ve made it this far! 

Thanks so much for joining us, makes this adventure all the more exciting and rewarding to know you’re out there and along for the ride.

Do please add your comments, questions and suggestions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  Even though I am WOEFULLY behind in responding to those of you who have done so in the past 3 weeks.  Rest assured I DO read them all and think about all you say and I will respond to each one in the next few days so thanks for your patience.

-Wayne

Slow & Steady: Progress Update XPM78-01 Oct 28-Nov 15, 2019

Slow & Steady: Progress Update XPM78-01 Oct 28-Nov 15, 2019

With apologies for taking so long to do so here finally is the long overdue weekly update for all you patient followers.

As you might recall from the last post, I flew to Florida to meet up with my Beautiful Bride Captain Christine who had been there for almost 6 seeks looking after a myriad of things from ordering boat parts, to updating her 100 Ton Captains license to being Gramma to our Grandson Liam.  I was there to help introduce Baris and Dincer, the brother owners of Naval Yachts to the US and the huge Ft. Lauderdale International Boat show known as FLIBS.  And then I had hundreds of boat parts to order, have shipped to us in Florida, make and crate it all up to be air freighted over to Naval and somewhere in there fly up to BC to see family and friends there, down to LA to have our CanAm (I’m Canadian, Christine’s American) with our similarly CanAm family and Granddaughters.

I had naively hoped to be able to find the time to keep up with these weekly updates while I was away for the past three weeks on a truly whirlwind tour of the US and Canada, but I came up against one of the only finite resources we have; time.  Still only 24 hours in each day, trust me I checked, and while I didn’t sleep too many of those 24 hours while away, there just wasn’t enough time left over after days and nights filled with time with friends, family and most of all grandkids on top of keeping up with Project Goldilocks both back at Naval Yachts and on a daily basis stateside ordering, shipping and packing literally hundreds of pieces and kilos of equipment and supplies to take back to Antalya.

I know, I know, ……….. excuses, excuses.  But let me plead my case just a wee bit by showing you just a few of the reasons why my time just got away from me:

IMG_20191030_201200Our now FOUR year old Grandson Liam

IMG_20191111_144737

Three year old Granddaughter Blair

IMG_20191111_144847

And Five year old Brynn


IMG_20191110_175957CanAm Thanksgiving dinner
IMG_20191113_152308Building shipping crates
IMG_20191114_230148IMG_20191115_092408Filling shipping crates
IMG_20191115_000635IMG_20191115_161420IMG_20191115_161428Trucking crates to the shipper in time.  All 392 kgs/864 lbs for this one crate alone.


WhatsApp Image 2019-10-30 at 11.16.28Introducing Baris and Dincer to the USA and FLIBS (Ft. Lauderdale International Boat Show) for their first time.

IMG_20191107_164337Pausing long enough to take in another gorgeous Vancouver sunset with dear friends.

Well, you get the idea.  All just excuses I know, but you might admit some pretty darn cute and great ones and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
But let’s get back to boat building shall we?!!!!!

As you may have noticed in the title, I’m going to cover TWO weeks of progress for you here, spanning October 28th through November 15th, 2019 so hang on to your hats, grab a tasty beverage and let’s go fly through Naval Yachts shipyard and see what Team Möbius has been up to.

PLUMBING:

Let’s start with Plumbing Progress for a change and check in with Cihan to see what he’s been up to.

WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.29.26 PM (8)Down in the Basement he has now mounted and plumbed one of two 150L/40 USG black water holding tanks,  This one in the Basement is for the Guest Head and …..
IMG_20191118_102519…. this one waiting down on the shop floor will soon be mounted in the Forepeak to service the Master Cabin Head. 

These are complete systems with a super reliable Dometic diaphragm pump, odor filtered vent and all the built in fittings.

WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.29.26 PM (4)Next to the BW Holding tank Cihan as also mounted the vacuum generator that is part of our beloved VacuFlush toilet systems.  We had these on our previous boat and worked flawlessly for the 14 years I had her and we really love how well they work.
IMG_20191122_122706_MPHere is how these two components sit in the Basement, up against the WT Bulkhead with the Guest Head immediately on the other side so very short pipe runs even though these VacuFlush systems are built to have very long runs with no problem.
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.29.26 PM (5)As we do with all the equipment, the Holding Tanks and Vacuum Generators are isolated from the boat by mounting systems that keep them clear of the floor as in this case and also allow us to create vibration absorbing soft mounts where needed such as on the Vacuum Generator to ensure no noises from the pumps can transmit through the hull and interior.
IMG-8143These two diaphragm bilge pumps are another example of how we keep all components isolated from the boat.


For those unfamiliar with VacuFlush it is a system very similar to the way the heads on airplanes work.  The Vacuum Generator creates a vacuum between itself and the underside of the toilet bowl and so when you step on the foot pedal beside the toilet everything in the bowl is instantly pulled through the sanitation hoses, through the VG and into the Holding tank.  The Holding tank then has its own diaphragm pump to extract the contents out to the Sea Chest or to a pump out connection on deck for shore side pump outs.


WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.29.26 PM (10)This manifold is part of the plumbing for the pump out of both the Gray and Black Water systems.  Given our typical sailing style we don’t usually need to use shoreside pump out facilities and can discharge when miles off shore through our Sea Chests so this manifold allows us to select between Sea Chest and pump out for the BW.


WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.29.26 PM (13)More of Cihan’s handiwork in the Basement on the various Bilge pump plumbing.  Larger 40mm/1.5” hose is for the high volume Bilge pump system and the smaller 25mm/1” clear hoses and those two diaphragm pumps are for slurping up any small amounts of water that might find its way into those “gutters” formed where the tank tops are curved down so they can be welded perpendicularly to the hull sides.  Makes for a very tidy, effective and efficient bilge system.
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.29.26 PM (15)And Cihan makes it all the neater with his careful routing of all these hoses through the “super highways” of cable trays running throughout the boat.

CABINETRY:

Our awesome Cabinetry team of Omur, Selim and Ömer have been keeping up their always impressive progress as they build the cabinetry for the Galley, SuperSalon, Guest Cabin and Office areas so let’s go see what they’ve been up to the past 2 weeks.


TFDX4700One of the newest cabinets to get started are the ones for the freezers and fridges.  A bit hard to see through the blizzard of clamps perhaps but this is the cabinet for the two 130L/35USG Vitrifrigo fridges which will slide snugly into the two large openings and with two storage drawers below.

Reefer box ideas mob_r_01Yesim provided this quick render so you can see how all four units will look along the Port side of the SuperSalon.  This is a much more efficient and pleasing design that what you may recall seeing in previous renders where we have moved the two freezer drawer cabinets forward and tucked them out into the large space under the side decks. 
Keeps everything nice and low and makes both the fridges and the freezers much easier to access when you open them.


TOPN8272 Here is the cabinet for the two drawer freezers being assembled in the Cabinetry shop.
IMG-8177This helps to see both the placement of these cabinets and the relative size of the two fridge units and drawers.
IMG-8176And these two freezer drawers.  You can see how far back this space extends under the side decks and we are taking maximum advantage of this voluminous area on both sides of the SuperSalon.  You’ll see more examples in the coming weeks as those cabinets go in.
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.28.59 PM (16)The cabinetmakers amongst you will appreciate this sectional shot of the back edge on one of the walls of the fridge cabinet showing how the exposed edges are all built with solid Rosewood for both longevity and nicely radiused corners throughout.  The marine plywood you see is that new sustainable and very light weight Poplar based product that is working out eXtremely well to dramatically reduce the weight of all the cabinetry and provide a super stable substrate for all the cabinets.


WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.28.59 PM (2)and of course Wayne’s infamous “Blue Horizon Line & Handhold continues throughout this and all other interior areas of the boat.


IMG-8173Standing with your back against the Fridge cabinets and looking across to the Starboard side we see that the dining settee is now all fitted in place.  Those two doors in the seat back provide access to that voluminous area under this side’s decks.
IMG-8175Standing forward near the Main Helm station and looking aft this shot provides a sense of scale and location for the dining settee relative to the Galley.
IMG-8178Not all of the action and progress is happening in the SuperSalon as Ömer and Okan continue to work on the cabinetry down in the Port side of the Guest Cabin area.

Okan is test fitting the tall cabinet as you do down the stairs to my Office area.  This and the cabinet that will soon fill the space to the right will be home to the Aft electrical distribution panel, circuit beakers, etc..
IMG-8179With that tall cabinet out of the way you get a better shot of the generous amount of “clean workbench” area I will have in this Office that flanks the corridor leading to the main Workshop and Engine room.  You can see this WT doorframe at the very top of this photo behind Ömer’s back.
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.28.27 PMNever too many drawers and storage on a workbench or office right?  Plus there is another whole set up above.  The large opening below the center of the desktop provides space for a swivel out seat when I’m working here.

ALUMINIUM WORKS:


Last but never least for this week’s Progress Update let’s see what Uğur and Nihat have been up to with several aluminium projects onboard.

FAES2225Nihat made quick work of fabricating and then mounting the circular chain locker.
GTMU5923Uğur laid down a nice MIG weld inside and outside the seam.
ETWW0201They welded in the slightly dished towards the center (for drainage)  bottom plate and the Chain Bin was ready to head to its new home in the Forepeak.

Could almost be mistaken for a work of art don’t you think?
IMG-8184Nihat and Uğur made a series of brackets to attach the Chain Bin to the frames in the Forepeak,
IMG-8183Leaving plenty of space for me to be able to climb in there to clean things out in the future.
IMG-8181Looking underneath shows the solid framing to support the significant weight of 100-150m/330-500ft of 13mm/ 1/2” Schedule 4 chain.

The Chain Bin is completely self draining and that pipe exiting the center of the bottom will lead over to the exiting Sea Chest on the left.

DXNL0068Another new project involved these disks of aluminium and rubber.  Can you guess what these are for?
AAJO0520Getting any warmer with this upside down view?
95BA4FFD-9333-4B94-B4D7-70F973766720How about if I let Yigit show you the completed prototype?
34235c67-ea3d-4dd9-a18c-4fb118085ffdCorrect!  These are the adjustable lids for every circular vent penetration in the deck.  XPM boats are self righting and so all sources of water entry must be able to be shut off either manually or automatically. 
d4940d82-e0d6-4dbd-b6fb-abe65b709f97Most of these adjustable vent lids are located inside the Dorade Boxes on the Foredeck which you can see in this render.  The flexible cowls can be rotated 360 degrees and they catch any breeze and direct that fresh air down into the Dorade Box area below and any water that might come in drains out through slots all along the bottom edge of the Dorade Box and the deck.
321e7f31-91ad-4d51-89a9-74062b1b1e0bThe fresh air flows down into the interior through the Vent pipe when these adjustable lids are well up above the top of the pipe and in almost all situations this ensures great ventilation in almost any weather or sea conditions as the water is kept out.  However if conditions were really severe or for any other reason you wanted to close off these vents you just reach up from inside the boat and turn the threaded rod to bring the lids down and sealed tight against the top of the vent pipe. 

Another good example of the KISS approach we take wherever possible.
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.28.09 PM (2)Uğur, Okan and Nihat were also busy finishing the Paravane A-Frame booms so they erected some scaffolding to get up to the top of the 7m long Paravane booms to fit and weld the hinge assemblies.
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.28.09 PM (6)This is the hinge half at the end of the angled pipe of the A-Frame assembly which
WhatsApp Image 2019-11-02 at 8.28.09 PM (8)…… mates with this swivel that attaches to the beefy Rub Rails.
IMG_20191120_121849In the midst of all this they also found time to complete the building of the rudder which also now looks to me like artwork as it gleams in the sunlight streaming into the shipyard.
062cb647-740f-494c-9bc9-cd9f2270dcccPrior to being assembled and welded the Rudder Post spent some time in the machine shop having the hole for the Emergency Steering Tiller machined through the top and
726049cf-64ca-4078-8ae1-e7ffe73b3837…. the keyway slot milled out for the Tiller Arm to attach to once mounted in the boat.
IMG_20191120_121901The Rudder Blade still needs some finish work on the welds and then the whole blade assembly will be primed, faired and sanded very smooth prior to being eventually covered with foul release paint along with all the other parts of the hull below the Water Line.  For now though it is all ready to be fitted into the hull with its pair of self aligning bearings.

Whew!  I’m tired just writing about all that work. 

Again my apologies for keeping you all waiting and I’ll now go write up the Weekly Progress for this past week so that you are all caught up with the work of Team Möbius.

Our time away visiting friends and family and getting in some much needed Gramma and Grampa time was priceless and we are also happy to be back here and bear down on getting Möbius ready for Launch as soon as we can make that happen.

Thanks for choosing to spend some of your time joining us on this adventure and PLEASE do add any and all comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

See you again next week.

-Wayne

PS.  Special thanks to Yigit and Uğur for taking most of these pictures for me while I was away.  Thanks guys!





Aluminium & Rosewood: as beautiful as it sounds – XPM78-01 Weekly Progress Update Oct. 7-11, 2019

Aluminium & Rosewood: as beautiful as it sounds – XPM78-01 Weekly Progress Update Oct. 7-11, 2019

For this past week, work on our XPM78-01 at Naval Yachts was focussed on the Cabinetry in the Galley and Guest Cabin and aluminium work on the rudder, chain bin, Dolphin watching seats and more.  Here is a Show & Tell summary so you can see for yourself.

IMG_20191011_093648Let’s begin with these beauties.  Can you guess what this is?
IMG_20191011_093657Will it help if I show you where it is going to go?

IMG_20191011_132656Correct! 

These are the eXtremely strong padeyes on each of the aft corners for attaching a drogue or perhaps a stern anchor line.

The hole has a 316 SS bushing pressed into it to reduce the wear from the shackle used to attach the drogue.

Drogues and Sea Anchors

A drogue is one of the ways of helping control a boat in eXtremely large seas and is the opposite of a sea anchor as this illustration shows.

Related imageJohn over on the Attainable Adventures blog, which is a treasure trove of great information for blue water sailors, has this well done sketch showing the basic operation of a drogue and how it can help control a boat that is roaring down huge breaking waves by slowing it down and reducing the likelihood of the bow digging into the wave ahead at the bottom of the trough and pitch poling over itself.  NOT a good thing or an experience we ever hope to have!  But having this kind of emergency equipment aboard is one of the ways we implement our strategy of “readiness for the unexpected”.
IMG_20191011_132812As you might guess from looking at that sketch, trying to slow down almost 45 tons of boat racing down mountainous waves in these kinds of conditions puts an unimaginable amount of force on these systems and requires an equally eXtreme attachment point to attach the boat to the drogue.  Hence this design we came up with for the padeye we would use if we ever needed to deploy our drogue.

IMG_20191011_132720Peering inside the hull you can see the substantial amount of the padeye that sits inside and will be heavily welded to the frames on this aft corner of the hull.
IMG_20191011_132847Standing back you can see how this fits into the Aft Deck and Swim Platform layout.

IMG_20191011_132837

And this is the matching padeye on the other side.

AFT PORT SIDE STANCHIONS:

IMG_20191009_174454Uğur also finished off the last of the stanchions to be installed, these ones on the Aft Port side which will be removable as they only go in when the Tender is off the deck.

IMG_20191010_114800Uğur has had LOTS of practice with all the other stanchions and their pipe sockets which are welded through the beefy Rub Rails so he soon has these last three stanchion sockets welded into the Rub Rails…….
IMG_20191010_102017…… and presses the black Delrin sleeves into each one.
IMG_20191010_182848He has finished fabricating the stanchion posts and they are now test fitted into their respective sockets.

DOLPHIN WATCHING SEATS:


IMG_20191009_174006Moving up to the bow, Uğur ticked off another job there with the mounting of the two Dolphin watching seats on either side of the bow pulpit railings.
IMG_20191009_174052We came up with this hinged arrangement so they can be easily flipped up and out of the way when anchoring.
IMG_20191009_174215Like this. 
IMG_20191009_174155I am still sketching up different ways of securing the seats when they are folded up.  Perhaps in this position where I would need to have a way to secure the hinged vertical leg.
IMG_20191009_174109Which wouldn’t be neccessary in this position where the leg sits tight against the seat rail but it presents an unattractive safety hazard with the part sticking up above the top rail.

Or I may just use some quick release pins to be able to remove the leg entirely and then come up with a nearby spot to hold it.

Stay tuned to see what emerges as the solution and by all means send in your ideas too.

GUEST CABIN:

IMG_20191008_100356Omer continues to apply his craftsmanship to the Guest Cabin and has now finished the slide out couch/bed assembly and moved on to building the headboard of the bed and the bookshelf unit that wraps around the forward Starboard corner of the cabin.


IMG_20191008_100402

He has fitted this little angled cupboard between the bed and Christine’s desk which will be handy for both Guests and Christine to use.  It will have a door on it next.
IMG_20191008_145439Next he test fit the back of the couch.  The space below is to allow the large bottom cushion/mattress to slide all the way inside when it is folded up in couch mode and keep the depth of the bottom of the couch a good size.
IMG_20191008_182340Then he installed the framing for the top shelf and there is similar framing hidden down at the bottom.  The tape indicates that there will be removable access panels there so I can easily access the water manifolds and other systems that are back there if ever needed.
IMG_20191009_174542The carefully laminated top surface goes in next and spans the whole distance from the desk over to the forward wall that is the WT Bulkhead with the Basement on the other side.
IMG_20191009_174556Which will look like this.
IMG_20191009_174611This recess is where the back cushion will fit partially inside and held in place with in couch mode.  Half the thickness of the cushion will be inside this recess and have extending out.

IMG_20191009_174636

With a matching arrangement on the other side.
IMG_20191010_115642With the couch/bed all fitted in place Omer turned his attention to the L shaped bookshelf unit that wraps around the forward corner of the Cabin.
IMG_20191010_115650It all starts out being very simple with the cutting of these top and bottom boards after they have been laminated with their Rosewood surfaces.
Guest Cabin V2 Fwd Stbd cornerRenderings are so useful in helping with that phantasmagoria I mentioned in the previous posting where the virtual reality blends with the real reality and for those of us doing this every day you see the finished whole all the time no mater if you are looking at a largely empty space or those two L shaped boards in the photo above or this rendering on the left.
IMG_20191011_181955This helps to visualise both the relative size and shape of this bookshelf.
IMG_20191011_182006This is the bottom side of the bookshelf with Rosewood on the top and bottom surfaces and then there will be a white shelf in between which you can see in the rendering above.

GALLEY CABINETRY:


IMG_20191007_101536Not to be outdone Omur and Selim have been eXtremely busy working up in the Galley on the somewhat complex set of cabinets with over 18 drawers so let’s check that out next.  Yigit is aboard frequently monitoring the progress and helping me keep the thousands of little details all straight.  Yigit also looks after much of the ordering of all the materials and equipment from our many suppliers so his phone is his constant companion.
IMG_20191007_101555The cabinet in the upper area is the six drawer unit that goes in where Yigit is standing.

MOBIUS_SALOON_RENDER (4)Quick jump to the virtual world of renderings to refresh the layout of the overall Super Salon with the Galley in the upper right corner.

IMG_20191007_132526Selim on the far left is standing inside what will be the forward corner of the Galley cabinets as he and Omur start getting this cabinet perfectly aligned with the others and precisely leveled. 


IMG_20191008_100554Notice how the white epoxy painted boards under the bases of each cabinet have been painstakingly leveled using all those little wood wedges.  These foundation boards also raise the cabinets up to the same height as the 40mm/ 1.6” rigid foam insulation which will eventually cover the entire floor and have the PEX tubing running through it for the in-floor heating.
IMG_20191010_102204Here we are looking down inside the cabinet that will have the double sink installed in the far right side.  The cut out on the back is to provide me access to the quite large volume area that is underneath the side decks.  In addition to all the tank vent and fill hoses you can see we will have other equipment in this area such as the air handlers for the AirCon system so having access all along this large volume area goes towards our goal of low and easy maintenance.
IMG_20191010_140130Next piece of this jigsaw puzzle is the cabinet on the left here for the induction cooktop and Smart Oven (combo microwave, convection, grill ovens).
IMG_20191011_133034Fits perfect!  For those of you who have been following for some time this will now help you visualise and understand why there is that white-stepped connector framing between the upper corner of the Guest Cabin down below and this far end of the Galley where the stove and oven fit in.
IMG_20191011_133010

The cupboard in the middle here is sized for a standard dishwasher or a two drawer dishwasher to slide into but we prefer hand washing so this will instead be filled with two large drawers for pots and pans and the like.
IMG_20191011_133041Looking across that dishwasher cabinet to the “peninsula” cupboard opposite shows the 7 drawers it contains.  The tall skinny one in the middle will be like a drawer with no sides and pull out to reveal a set of shelving racks to provide easy access from either side to containers of things like spices.
 Space Saving Details for Small Kitchens #kitchenremodel #smallkitchen #spacesaving ~ vidur.netMaybe something like this for example.
IMG_20191011_133127OK, Galley cabinets are all in place, time to move on to the adjoining L-shaped settee and dining area so they get started putting down the foundation frames and shimming them to be on eXactly the same level as the other cabinetry.

MOBIUS_SALOON_RENDER (6)This is about how this area will look when standing over on the far Port/Left side looking across.  The table is on a pedestal which has some very cool hardware I found that allows it to move in all three axis: Z up/down, X fore/aft and Y left/right. This gives us total flexibility to have this table at just the right height and position to use as a dining table, coffee table or additional Queen Bed.
But WAIT!  There’s more!

IMG_20191011_174755Look what showed up late Friday evening as I was leaving the shipyard!

Without cheating by zooming in, can you guess what this sturdy crate contains?

IMG_20191011_174847It arrived via air freight direct from Vancouver if that helps?

Yup, all of the many components that make out our rock solid steering system along with the controls for the Gardner engine and the Nogva CPP servo gearbox. 
As per the label here this all comes from Kobelt which is based in one of my old home towns of Vancouver not far from where I did some of my teacher training at BCIT many decades ago.  I worked closely with our designer Dennis and Lance and his team at Kobelt for over two years to design the Goldilocks just right steering for our XPM78-01 so you can imagine how happy I was to see this big beautiful crate full of steering goodness finally arrive.


IMG_20191011_180024Even though it was very late and Yigit and I were the only ones still in the yard, I just couldn’t resist taking a peek inside a few of the boxes so I’ll share two with you. 

This is one of the pair of double acting 75mm/3” ID hydraulic cylinders that will move the rudder and steer the boat.  Each one is sized to be able to fully steer the boat in all conditions so a double redundant system.
IMG_20191011_180612And then check out one of the pair of Accu-Steer HPU400 hydraulic pumps which will provide all the hydraulic pressure to run those cylinders.  These are massively strong and weigh in at 44kg/95 lbs each and are an integral part of what I’m sure is going to be an awemazing steering system in our XPM78-01 Möbius.


Much more to follow on the whole steering system in upcoming Weekly Updates as the installation begins and I will also be posting some Tech Talk articles where we can dive into all the details of the whole steering system design.


And th-th-th-that’s all for this week that was October 7 to 11 2019. 

We really do enjoy sharing this whole adventure with you and want to thank all of you who take the time to read these.  Special thanks to those of you who contribute comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box down below and hope that more of you will do the same.

See you next week.

-Wayne