The Pressure is ON! XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Update 30 May-5 June, 2022

Marmaris   marina at nightWe have spent this past week in the relatively small but very marine based town of Marmaris.
map-showing-marmaris-turkey-with-a-red-pin-3d-rendering-2F9749BFor orientation, here is Marmaris relative to the others nearby islands and coastline around us.
Turquoise CoastYou’ll recall this map from previous posts and we started out in Antalya where Möbius was built and have been slowly making our way West and North along the Turquoise Coast.  We spent the winter in Finike and left there to begin our cruising season back on May 17th.  As you have read in the previous weekly updates since then we have stopped in Kekova, Kaş, Fethiye, Göcek and now Marmaris.
Netsel Marina Marmaris aerial view labelledWe have spent the past week here in Netsel Marina in Marmaris and the arrow shows where Möbius is docked.
Netsel Marina Marmaris aerial view 2The city of Marmaris itself isn’t that large but as you can see the marina is literally part of the city.
Map of Setur Marinas in TurkeyNetsel is one of the 10 Setur Marinas along the Turquoise Coast that we have access to as part of our annual contract with Setur Marinas.  If you click to enlarge you can all the red Setur Marina pins.  Antalya is the most Eastern Setur Marina and then the other 9 marinas are spread out as the coastline moves West and North to Istanbul. 

Christine’s Knee Update

This is a very large and very full marina and not usually our cup of tea but as I mentioned last week, Christine had torn her meniscus in her left knee and getting that fixed became our #1 priority and Marmaris was the best place to put in to.  After several appointments with doctors in several other ports we stopped at along the way we decided that the best course of action was to go back to the same hospital in Antalya that we both had outstanding experience with while living there.  Sunday morning Christine made the 6+ hour ride on a very luxurious bus that she said was more like an airline than a bus and on Monday morning she met with the surgeon who specializes in arthroscopic knee surgery at 9:30.  After going over all the specifics of Christine’s history with this knee, their consensus was that arthroscopic surgery was the best choice.  The surgeon asked “When would you like to have the surgery done?” and when she said as soon as possible he said “OK, how about tomorrow?”.  Fifteen minutes later Christine was in a hospital bed being prepped for surgery on Tuesday.  As amazing as this might sound to many of you, this is our experience with hospitals and medical care in Turkey and makes it easy to understand why Antalya in particular is such a popular destination for medical tourism.

Good news is that the surgery went very well and both the surgeon and Christine were very pleased so I rented a car on Wednesday morning, packed the pups and was in Antalya by noon to pick Christine up and bring her back to Möbius.  She has been confined to the boat since then which has been challenging for her but as per the title of this week’s update, one of the ways in which “The Pressure is ON” is that she has been able to put more and more pressure on the knee as she hobbles around Möbius a bit better each day.  While not something any of us would want this has been one of those good reminders of just how important our health and mobility is and as Christine soon remarked “I had no idea we had so many steps on this boat!”.

The surgeon wants to see Christine again in about two weeks so we are now thinking that it may be best to motor our way back East and get closer to Antalya for her follow up and to make sure that she has her knee well looked after.  Stay tuned for updates on where we decide to go next.

Oil Pressure is ON too!

Dual oil pressure gaugesYou may recall from the great oil pressure hunt with Mr. Gee, I had installed two oil pressure gauges after discovering that the original one had been falsely reading 20 PSI too low and causing me a LOT of angst until I discovered this.  Mr. Gee now has over 40 hours of run time and has been purring along with a steady 35 PSI of oil pressure just as a healthy Gardner 6LXB should and so one of my jobs this week was to create the more permanent setup for monitoring Mr. Gee’s oil pressure.
PXL_20220603_140942645.MPHere is the cleaned up and likely permanent setup on the four port bronze oil pressure manifold on the side of the oil filter.  Moving down from the liquid dampened oil pressure gauge on top, the other three ports are:

     1.  black pipe that takes pressurized oil over to the valve rockers on each head,

     2.  Silver fitting that takes oil pressure through a flexible hose over to an electric oil pressure sensor mounted on the opposite side of the black oil filter housing

     3.  Low Oil pressure warning switch which will also provide power to the engine hour meter anytime Mr. Gee is running
PXL_20220603_140927749.MPThe silver canister is the electric oil pressure sensor which sends its analog data over to ………
PXL_20220327_122546988  …… this Actisense EMU-1 engine monitor which converts all the analog engine data such as oil pressure, oil & coolant temperature, CPP oil temp & pressure, into digital signals and sends these onto our N2K network that is used to communicate ALL the boat’s data to the boat computers and onto any of the six monitors we have on the Upper and Lower Helm stations as well as broadcasting this wirelessly to our phones, tablets and any other monitors we chose.
PXL_20220605_125829832This is an example of the kind of dashboards that Christine is building using our Maretron N2K View software which allows us to create virtual gauges, switches, warning lights, alarms, etc.  We are slowly learning our way around this eXtremely powerful and diverse tool but we have a long ways to go and there really is no end to the different screens, gauge types, switches, alarms, lights, logs, graphs and other info we can display using this Maretron N2K View software.
Maretron N2K View Mobile Engine DataThere is also a free Maretron N2K View mobile app which we have on our phones so we can also see all this data on these screens as well.  Not something we use a lot as the larger screens provide a much more comprehensive collection of data on their larger real estate at each Helm but the phones are super handy when you are somewhere else on the boat and just want to check how things are working.  I also tend to use this while I’m working on some system somewhere else on the boat and can use my phone to show me what’s going on as I adjust things in the Engine Room or down in the Basement where most of the Victron electronics are located.  eXtremely handy and powerful and will only get more so as we learn to use these tools better over time and create all the Goldilocks displays that each of us prefer.
PXL_20220605_125902758.MPNow that we had Mr. Gee’s oil pressure on the N2K network via the EMU-1, we were able to create the virtual oil pressure gauge you see here and with a bit of tweaking we were able to configure this so that the pressure shown on this gauge matched the PSI shown on the liquid filled gauge on Mr. Gee.  Having all this data able to be displayed on any screen on the boat is a huge benefit while we are underway keeping us fully informed as to how everything on the boat is functioning.  We have a LOT of work to do to build out all the various screens we want for different contexts but this is a good start for now.

Configuring the Auto Pilots

PXL_20220605_130518956While I was in configuration mode I decided to also finish configuring our two Furuno 711C Auto Pilots.  The 711C display head you see on the bottom Left of the Main Helm provides all the data and controls for our Auto Pilots and there is a duplicate setup at the Upper Helm on the SkyBridge.  To the right of the 711C AP is the Furuno Jog Lever which is the second way we can steer the boat by simply moving that Black knob whichever way we want the rudder to move. 
The rotary switch to the Right of the Jog Lever is used to select which of the two helm stations is active.  The two silver levers on the far Right are how we control the throttle and the pitch.

Took a few hours but all of these are now working properly and next trip we will do the final tweaks to the Auto Pilot while we are underway and can dial in the actual zero rudder position.  These Furuno AP’s have the very great feature of “auto learning” and so as we use the boat more the AP system is learning the specifics of how Möbius handles, turns, rolls, etc. and uses this to dial in all the settings better and better over time.

Of course this being a boat, there were plenty of other little gremlins and “moles” to whack back down like the house water pump that I just spent the past 5 hours replacing today, but that’s how our start to yet another new month played out and I hope that yours was equally productive. 

How can it be another month already and almost half way through 2022?!?  However, with our recent reminder as to how precious time is we continue to be grateful for every day that speeds by and can only hope to have many more to come and enjoy each one as it passes.

Hope you will join us again for next week’s update and till then please be sure to add your comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne

Tender Wiring XPM78-01 Möbius Update 2-7 May, 2022

First and foremost my best and biggest wishes to all the Moms out there!  Every day should be Mother’s Day in my opinion so I hope this is just an extra special day for all of you extra special people.

The past week has been filled with a litany of little jobs for the most part and nothing too visual to show you so I’ll keep this short so as not to take up much time on Mother’s Day or better yet, don’t bother reading till later this week.

Christine and I are inching closer and closer to the day when we finally throw off the dock lines here at Setur Marina in Finike and begin our adventures making our way up the Turkish coast a bit and then start making our way West across the Med this summer. If all goes well we hope to take off in about two weeks as we whittle the To List down more each day.  Thanks to the help of the great people at Electrodyne and WakeSpeed I think we have found the causes of the one alternator and regulator that are not working properly and have the new parts being put together to be shipped out next week.  With us about to become “moving targets” with no fixed address I will need to figure out how and where best to get these parts delivered to us but after so many years out sailing the world this is a very common problem for us and we always manage to find a way to get boat parts and boat united.

PXL_20210508_142134749 One of the big things I need to get done before we take off is getting our Tender “Mobli” finished and running and also be able to test out launching and retrieving him with our Davit Arch system.  So in addition to working on some of the remaining To Do items such as tracking down some new gremlins in our Shore Power setup, I have been trying to stay focused on getting Mobli finished.
PXL_20220430_141100157Last week you saw me finish installing the wet exhaust system and I’m waiting the arrival of two more hose clamps to finish that completely and that leaves just the electrical wiring to be fully completed.  So as per the title, wiring was the focus this week.
PXL_20220507_154630029Christine has been my trusted parts finder and delivery person tracking down the parts and supplies I need to complete the work on the Tender.  She has taking taking full advantage of her fabulous new eBike to pick up parts available here in our little town of Finike or take the 2 hour bus ride down to the big city of Antalya to bring back parts from there.  One of those items was a 12 volt AGM battery and battery box which I now have solidly mounted on this shelf I created using some leftover composite grid that we used for the flooring in the ER, Workshop and Forepeak.

I had several of these large Red Battery Switches from Blue Sea left over from building Möbius and so I installed two of these.
PXL_20220507_154622505.MPthat This under seat area is easy to access, fully protected, easy to lock up and keeps the weight well centered so this seemed like the best location for the battery. 
PXL_20220507_152943165I installed the second battery switch in the Engine Bay on the opposite side of the AL bulkhead under the seat.  This isn’t really necessary but provides a very secure anti-theft device when turned off and the Engine Bed lid is locked.  We would not likely need to use it very often so it will just be left on most of the time but will be good to have if we ever need to leave the Tender ashore for long periods of times or we are unsure of the security ashore.
PXL_20220507_152949264.MPThe primary 12V positive 1/0 size Red cable goes from this switch under the Yanmar engine and connects directly to ….
PXL_20220503_153811831… this stud on the starter solenoid.  A bit tight to get to but it is now on and well tightened.
PXL_20220507_152938918The other smaller Red AWG 8 gauge cable comes off the same switch and goes back to the jet drive along with the other wiring for the jet drive and the two Black hydraulic hoses for steering the jet drive.
PXL_20220507_152922879The steering is also hydraulic but is manually powered by turning the steering wheel.  The hydraulic pump that raises and lowers the jet drive’s bucket is electric so that Red cable goes to this 50 Amp breaker which feeds power to the pump behind it.  There is also the same size Black negative cable that runs from the engine ground to the bronze stud you can see in the center of this shot.
PXL_20220507_152934488Some nylon zip ties help keep all the wiring and hydraulic hoses in place and well protected and with that the wiring inside the Engine Bay is now pretty much complete.  Just need to add engine oil, coolant and hydraulic fluid and this should be ready to fire up as soon as we launch the Tender and have it in the water needed for the wet exhaust and heat exchangers.
PXL_20220402_154030638Next week I will move back to the console to finish connecting the Castoldi jet drive wire harness to the Yanmar harness.
PXL_20220507_111327451That leaves me with these 8 wires that connect to the ignition and starter switches and the bucket position gauge which I hope to get done next week.
PXL_20210505_073322984.MPDepending on if I get the remaining parts in time and finish all the wiring, we may be able to launch Mobli over the side next week and fire him up so be sure to tune in again next week to see all that.
Thanks as always for joining us again this week and be sure to leave your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  They are all VERY much appreciated!

Now, let’s all get back to reminding all the Moms in our lives how awemazing they are!

-Wayne

Möbius has her Blue Eyes on Evil YOU! Weekly Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius April 12-17, 2021

As we all continue to work our way through the commissioning of systems and getting XPM78-01 Möbius fully ship shape and sea worthy, it was another week of good progress but nothing too visually exciting for you I’m afraid.  However, progress is being made and there were some significant accomplishments this week so come on along for this week’s Show & Tell.

Beautiful Blue Eyes

PXL_20210328_151415724You may recall seeing these beautifully handcrafted glass “Blue Turkish “Evil Eyes” that Christine found in Antalya when I posted about them in THIS previous blog post last month.  In Turkish, these are called nazar boncuğu and they are seen on almost every boat here in Turkey and many other countries.
IMG_20210417_092903The”Evil Eye” moniker is a bit misleading as these are a GOOD thing with folklore having that they protect you from evil and bring good luck. 

Hope I didn’t offend the Evil Eye for making it wear this patch while the adhesive dried overnight!
IMG_20210417_163944I like twisting a straight line spectrum so that the two opposite ends meet so this seemed like the perfect spot to have these beautiful glass eyes cozy up to their opposite lean and mean XPM78-01 military font on the bow.

What do you think?

Stop the Bleeding!!

The major milestone/accomplishment this week for sure was getting the hydraulic steering cylinders re-machined, installed and finally working with NO leaks!

Kobelt 7080 cylinder image

We are using Kobelt 7080 balanced cylinders that have a 3” ID with a 12” stroke cylinders and as you can see they are Beautiful Brutes.
Kobelt 7080 cylinder dim dwgDennis and I spent a good long time with the great engineers at Kobelt in Vancouver BC and this is the cylinder geometry that we came up with. 
IMG_20210418_171119There are two of these SS bleeder screws, one at each end which you use to bleed the air out of the system as you first fill it up or after working on the system.  The threaded bleeder screw has a 4mm OD SS ball bearing underneath which when tightened easily seals of the 1000 PSI pressures that we can see in rough weather steering.  However the body of these end caps is brass which is relatively soft compared to SS and so you have to tighten these the Goldilocks Just Right amount or else the SS ball deforms the brass seat which is what had happened to several of these bleeder screws when they were originally installed and hence they leaked.

Getting new end caps sent over from Vancouver would have taken too much time and money so I thought I’d try to re-machine the angled brass face at the bottom and see if I could renew the cylinder end caps this way.
Kobelt 7080 section drawingAt the left and right ends of the bottom section drawing you can see how these bleeder screws (#11) work.

(click to enlarge any picture)
Kobelt 7080 Bleeder Screw dim dwgLance and Keivan who I worked with at Kobelt continued to be absolute super hero’s for me throughout the many years I’ve been working with them and were able to send me this dimensioned drawing of the bleeder screw and several other drawings for me to figure out how to re-machine the brass faces. 

They also dug up that the included angle of the brass face is machined to be 1180  so I had all the info I needed to fabricate a little re-facing tool.
IMG_20210414_141936Hard to show you but here is the little tool I came up with.  It is the end of a broken 4.5mm titanium drill pit which I ground the end to a 1180 angled cone shape, a bit like a sharpening a wood pencil and then used a very thin cutting wheel chucked in my ever handy Dremel tool to cut these four groves which created the sharp “teeth” to cut the brass seats inside the end caps.  The trick was to create a tool that was part cutter and part burnisher because the face of the seats need to be very flat and even all around for the SS ball to seal.
IMG_20210414_123146I was pushing to get this all done as soon as possible so I didn’t get any photos of the process but I clamped the brass end caps in the blue vice you see in the background and then chucked my little tool bit in my drill press and carefully removed just enough brass to renew the seats yet not take off too much brass and weaken the seal.

I’ve dragged that drill press around the world with me for over 40 years and this is a good example why.  And Yes! it is about to get mounted in my Workshop on Möbius for another world tour.

IMG_20210418_171052From there it was a relatively straight forward task of putting the cylinders back together again and remounting them to the AL tiller arm on the Rudder Post at one end and to the brass ball socket joint on the other outbound end.


IMG_20210418_171127Connect the hydraulic hoses, fire up the Accu-Steer HPU400 24V Hydraulic Power Units (pumps) and then bleed the whole system.steering pumps.  Once I had all the air out I was eXtremely careful to tighten those bleeder screws to that Goldilocks torque and then test by running the pumps briefly up to their max 1000 PSI.
IMG_20210418_171112…….. and ………

….. check out underneath those bleeder screws …..

……… dry!  No leaks now!


*  I think I heard Möbius release a soft sigh (and a few other people at Naval as well) to finally have her steering back in full working order again.  And me too!

Stand Back!  Free for All in the Free Zone!

While all this work was going on aboard Möbius, there was MUCH more action happening all around us every day because for the past few months there has been 400 million Euro construction project of the launching facilities at the Free Zone.  Check THIS very well done time lapse VIDEO ANIMATION which does a great job of showing how the whole new harbour facility works.  A very innovative idea with that cable raised platform!

IMG_20210415_140349The dramatically enlarged launching bays called for an equally enlarged TraveLift and so over the past 3 weeks, this tiny little 560 tonne TraveLift was being assembled right beside us and this week he sprang to life and has been an eXtremely busy boy!

With no launching facilities in the Free Zone harbour for the past 3-4 months there has been a huge backlog building up of new boats waiting to be launched and older ones waiting to be hauled out for their refits.  This week those flood gates opened up and they have been launching and hauling out boats every day.
IMG_20210415_140511Such as this classic trawler style Bering 80.
IMG_20210416_162950This 36 meter “Phantom Phi” boat by Alia shipyard.  This is a support vessel for a super yacht and these are often referred to as “Ghost” or “Phantom” boats as they are not to be seen by the superyacht they are supporting.
IMG_20210417_092508This shot will add some perspective for you to see the relative size of the raised platform bay that they will be installing next.  Check out the link to the animation above to see how this works and I think you too will be impressed.
IMG_20210414_143549Out behind us is one of four 25m Turkish Coast Guard boats launched this week by Damen Yachts.

I have lost count now but I’d say well over 20 boats like these have launched this past week so there is never a dull moment here in the Antalya Free Zone.

And that’s the week that was April 12-17 here at Naval Yachts and aboard the Good Ship Möbius.  Hope you enjoyed this brief update and I will try to have more for you in the next weekly update.

Please be sure to leave all questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below and I hope you will be back for more next week.

-Wayne

Even a Beast Deserves some Beauty! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update March 29-April 3 2021

Unbelievably, yet another month zips into the past and we’re now sailing into the second quarter of 2021.  Yikes!  And it was another eXtremely busy week aboard the Good Ship Möbius but alas, not so much that is very visible and so not a lot of content for this week’s Show & Tell Progress Update.  However we also had some eXtremely eXciting milestones and firsts to share with you so let’s jump right into that.

The Beast Gets Some Bling!

PXL_20210401_133352634Regular readers know that I quite like having the contrasting combination of Beauty and Beastly and Mr. Gee, our Gardner 6LXB engine is perhaps my favorite example of this combination.  His  “Beastly” characteristics include the fact that he weighs a svelte 1400 Kg/3086 Lb that he puts out some monster torque of 736Nm / 542 ft-lb @ 1000 RPM. 
PXL_20210401_133412890His Beauty characteristics include his simplicity with a minimum of moving parts, no turbo, completely mechanical fuel injection, no glow plugs, zero electrical requirements to run and he is happy to be started with his hand crank.
PXL_20210401_133418842Being such a class act, at least in my eyes, I figured that he deserved a wee bit of eXtra class to add the finishing visual touch by carefully polishing a few of his many aluminium parts to a gleaming mirrorlike shine and I think he is quite happy. 

What do you think?
PXL_20210401_131901442.MPTo get this all done quickly, I turned to our “Turkish Fixer” Alaaddin and he was his typical resourceful self in finding all the polishing wheels, polishing compound and a local polishing machine and as you can see his was quite rightly happy with the results.  Thanks Alaaddin!


Möbius Mini Maiden Voyage

PXL_20210401_142554959.MPThe eXtremely eXciting milestone event we had this past week was that Möbius took her very first “voyage” under her own power and steering! 
PXL_20210401_142758317The caveats are that we only moved the boat a few hundred meters from the dock wall we had been Med moored to at Setur Marina around the corner and back into the Free Zone harbour where we tied up to the same end wall we had been at two weeks ago. 
PXL_20210401_144311381.MPNo big deal you might be saying but you’d be missing the point!  This was still her and our first trip under her own power so we are taking the Win! Smile 


You can check it all out in this short little video I’ve put together from one video I shot onboard and then two from ashore thanks to Dincer and Baris taking these on their smartphones.  My apologies for not having the time to do a better job of creating this video with sound and more info so this is a silent movie but I hope you will still enjoy it and get a sense of how exciting this milestone was for Christine and me.



Seemingly fitting, this happened on Thursday which was April Fool’s Day and then on Friday we had to move to a different wall in the Free Zone harbour because a large cargo ship was coming in and needed the whole end wall, so we got to take a second even “minier” voyage from the end wall around the corner to the side wall which was an eXtremely long ways away of almost 150 meters!  But still …………..

There is still some jobs that need to be completed before we can head out to sea and do a “full size” Maiden Voyage and sea trials but we hope that Naval will be able to get those done in the next few days so do stay tuned for more videos of our first “real” Sea Trial. 

Thanks for joining me on this equally “mini” weekly Progress Update and please be sure to add your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne



Navigating Our Way to the End of this eXtremely Long & Winding Tunnel XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 22-28 March 2021

Alas, the milestone of moving under our own power has eluded us for another week but next week is looking very promising for Möbius’ first of many sea trials.  We continue to experience a series of “installation issues” that have prevented our Kobelt hydraulic steering system and Kobelt Throttle/Pitch controls to work as they should and so without steering and propulsion we haven’t been going too far other than being towed.  But the fuel economy has been fabulous!

As with last week, with less progress than usual and not much of it being very visual, I don’t have as much content as usual for this week’s Show & Tell Progress Update, but grab a comfy seat and something tasty to drink and let’s get started with what I can show you about the past week of March 22-28, 2021.

Nazar Boncuğu Keeps Us Safe!

Many of you may already be familiar with Nazar Boncuğu aka “Turkish Evil Eye” as they are the most popular tourist souvenir of all and these captivating cast glass blue eyes have found themselves being transported to homes and boats all over the world, including ours.  As is the tradition, we have one right outside the front door of our apartment for the past 3+ years.  When Christine and I first came to Turkey back in 2014 so Christine could do her meticulous research for her next book at the time which became Knight’s Cross, we saw these Turkish Eyes warding off evil spirts on the bows almost every fishing boat in the many harbours we visited so of course we had to have them on Möbius’ bow too!


PXL_20210328_151430390While they can be found in shops almost everywhere, we wanted the Goldilocks Just Right version of Nazar Boncuğu and last week Christine spotted these two beauties in a specialty glass shop in Antalya and knew that these were it! 

As you can see in this photo, right now our pair are basking in the sun atop one of our Ro$ewood Galley Garages where they do look resplendent with the light coming off the water, but they are destined to be securely adhered to the bow next week so do stay tuned for those shots.


Do I See Light at the End of this eXtremely Looooong and Winding Tunnel?

Majuro to Suva Google MapsIn many ways, this whole adventure began back in March 2015 when Christine and I were making the 3000nm passage from Majuro in the Marshall Islands, down to Suva in Fiji. 
P1020320We had spent almost a year in Majuro which we are very much looking forward to returning to on our previous 52ft steel sailboat Learnativity and we had an awemazing 3 week passage down to …..
Map of Kiribati and more. ………. Suva with stops along the way at the island nations of Kiribati and Tuvalu along the way.
Voyaging Under Power Beebe 4th editionI had given Christine a copy of Robert Beebe’s “passagemaking bible” Voyaging Under Power and she was reading it on the passage down to Fiji and we would discuss it a lot as we sailed south.  Over the course of that 2+ week passage, we both became more and more aware of just how different passagemaking under power would be compared to sailing which we both knew and loved so much. 

By the time we got to Suva we had made the transition from thinking of switching from sail to power as a fun joke to being a real vision of our future.  As do most adventures I think, certainly most of mine, they begin when you start following your curiosity and now, six years later, we can see that this was when the adventure of designing and building Project Goldilocks, as we called it at the time,

In those six years we have gone from a very big vision to an eXtremely big reality and the path along the way has been like most of our adventures, one that includes several storms and other challenges along the way but always worth it for the joys at the end as one adventure transitions into the next.  We are not quite at the end of this latest adventure as the build continues, but we are now living more and more onboard and we grown increasingly eXcited about bringing this adventure to a close and beginning the next one back out on the ocean, eXperiencing the new storms and joys of what promises to be a very different type of voyaging under power for the first time.

Installation Issues Getting Resolved

The most recent set of “storms” for us has been a series of what I will simply refer to as “installation issues” which we have needed to resolve before we can begin to voyage under power for the first time on our first of what will be many, sea trials to shake as many gremlins out of the brand new Möbius and have as much of what is often referred to as “infant mortality” as possible before we finally leave Antalya in our wake.  This less than appealing term “infant mortality” is actually quite accurate in the context of a newly built custom boat as it refers to the several cases we are sure to have where brand new equipment and a brand new boat, will have items that are DoA or have not been installed correctly and fail to work as they should.  So far we have had very few new bits of kit that have been DoA on arrival but we have had a number of installation problems that have been keeping us from being able to go on our first voyage under power; our first sea trial!

This past week I have been working closely with our new electrician Ismail and along with some continuing eXemplary technical support from Lance, Keivan and Hicham at Kobelt Canada.  I have been working with Lance to design our steering and control systems for about four years now all together, and I can’t say enough about all of them at Kobelt who have been up in the very early morning for them in Vancouver, late evening for me here in Antalya, in order that we can do some live video calls for a techie version of Show & Tell as we went through hydraulic setups, wiring and they could watch what the moving components were doing, hear the sounds when they mattered and really be as close to being here in person with me as is possible.  As it turns out, all of the equipment from Kobelt arrived working as designed but the extensive list of items involved from hydraulic pumps, cylinders and valves to electronic controls and autopilot systems have been installed over the past 18 months and we are only now connecting all the parts together and there have been some issues along the way.

Three weeks ago the problem was that we weren’t getting pressure to the hydraulic steering cylinders, then two weeks ago we were having a long lag in time between when the Throttle or Pitch control levers were moved at one of the Helm Stations and when the lever on the Actuator box in the Engine Room moved and hence when the Throttle/Pitch cables and levers moved.  This past week we have been having difficulty getting the CPP Pitch Angle Gauges at each helm to communicate the correct Pitch Angle as the Pitch Control Levers were moved Ahead/Astern.  It goes as does most problem solving, you trace your way back to where you began, compare the schematics and guidelines from the manufacturers to the actual “as built” installation and you find the differences between those and fix them.  Sounds simple, and it is, but it sure can take time and effort to follow these long and winding paths.

PXL_20210328_120149743Perhaps it has been thanks to those two Turkish Evil Eyes being onboard that we have been on a solution per week schedule and the first two problems had been resolved in the previous two weeks, and I am delighted to report that as of last night (Saturday 27th March here) Ismail and I have the Pitch Angle gauges working and mounted back where they belong at each Helm Station!  We have tested all this with here at the dock Mr. Gee thrumming away and our Nogva CPP churning the clear waters underneath making Möbius tug at her dock lines.  Once all the other critical jobs have been finished such as finishing the deck hatches so they all close and seal properly, finishing and testing the fire hose and a still rather long punch list of other jobs, we will be *almost* good to go!


Almost, because there remains one last major and eXtremely critical system that needs to be finished before Möbius is seaworthy enough for her first sea trials; Navigation System.  This involves getting the key elements of our whole Furuno Navigation system working and configured as this includes things like our Radar, AutoPilots, VHF radio, AIS (Automatic Information System) and all the related screens, computers and black boxes which controls all that navigation equipment.  Good on that front is that Captain Christine has been leading her very own team of technicians which Naval has sub-contracted with to assist with getting the eXtremely multi-faceted navigation system of hardware and software all wired, inter-connected and configured.

For those interested in the details of our navigation system and to give the rest of you an idea of what all is involved, here is a quick overview of some of the individual bits of kit Christine and I have pulled together to build our Steering & Navigation system**

** FYI, on the Mobius.World blog site, there is a complete list of all the equipment in all the systems on Möbius available under the tab at the very top ribbon called “The Boat” which you can see by clicking HERE.

Here is the list of the components in our Steering, Navigation and Communications systems which are very intertwined:

STEERING SYSTEM
  • Primary STEERING x2 Kobelt Designed dual fully redundant hydraulic systems
  • 2x Kobelt Accu-Steer HPU400 pumps
  • 2x Kobelt 7080-B12 Balanced cylinders
  • STEERING Controls x2 Kobelt NFU jog levers @ Main & Upper Helms
  • Kobelt 7176 wired “Walk About” handheld remote station @ both Helms
  • auto pilots x2 Furuno 711C Auto Pilots, 2 independent units for redundancy
  • Steering Backup………. Kobelt manual hydraulic pump @ Main Helm w/ steering wheel
  • Emergency Tiller stored in ER, attaches direct to Tiller Arm w/ block & tackle controllers
  • NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT
  • main helm monitors… 2x LiteMax NavPixel 19” touchscreen 1600 nits @ 1280 x 1024
  • 1x 43” LiteMax Durapixel sunlight readable 1600 nits @ 3840×2160
  • 1x Samsung 50” SmarTV
  • upper SkyBridge monitors x2 LiteMax NavPixel 24” touch, 1000 nits @ 1920 x 1080
  • Navigation software x2 Time Zero Professional w/ Sounder + Radar modules
  • x1 RosePoint Coastal Explorer
  • x3 Navionics on Tablets
  • charts:….. Full set of Navionics World Mega-Wide charts on Furuno/TimeZero
  • Full set of Navionics/C-Map charts on Coastal Explorer
  • Main helm PC………. Micro ATX tower
  • Intel I7-9700, 16GB Ram, 1TB SSD, GTX 1660 6G OC Graphics card
  • Skybridge PC Kingdell Fanless mini PC, Intel I7-1051 16GB Ram, 512GB SSD
  • gateways:… RosePoint Nemo, NEMA 0183/2000, TCP/UDP, RS-422, RS-232, RJ45 ethernet
  • Maretron USB100 USB Gateway
  • Maretron IPG100 IP ethernet Gateway
  • AIS x3…………….. Emtrak A-200 Class A
  • Standard Horizon AIS B Class in GX6000 VHF radio
  • Tender = Vesper XB-8000 smartAIS Transponder w/ WiFi + NMEA2000 gateway
  • Weather station ….. Airmar 220 WX
  • w/ ultrasonic wind, barometer, 3 axis accelerometer, gyro + compass
  • Infra-red night vision….. FLIR Gyro stabilized camera M332
  • radar… Furuno FAR 1523 Radar Black Box with 6’ open array
  • heading compass……… Furuno SC33 Satellite compass
  • GPS Furuno GP330 GPS head dedicated to Radar
  • Standard Horizon GPS Head into GX6000 VHF radio
  • Standard Horizon GPS Smart Antenna SCU-31
  • Vesper GPS Head into XB-8000 in Tender
  • remote controllers x2:…… Furuno MCU004 Monitor Controller on Helm Chairs
  • Kobelt 7018 “WalkAbout” handheld wired remote @ both Main and Upper Helms
  • depth sounders x2
  • @Bow = Furuno BBDS1 bottom discriminating Black Box w/ 5205PSD transducer
  • @Stern = Furuno Ultrasonic UDST800 depth, speed, temp traducer
  • COMMUNICATIONS/MONITORING EQUIPMENT
    • VHF RADIO.. Standard Horizon GX6000 w/ AIS + NMEA2000
    • w/ AIS + SART target display & GPS Compass
    • RAM 4 remote mic @ Main Helm
    • Wireless mic w/access point
    • loudhailer….. Standard Horizon Dual Zone 25W PA / Loud Hailer
    • with preprogrammed fog signals + Listen Back
    • Horn………. Kahlenburg S-330 air horn
    • Satellite coms…………. Iridium GO!
    • Data logger…. Yacht Devices Voyage Recorder YDVR-04
    • Search light………. ACR Artex RCL-95 Pan/Tilt/Zoom 500W Searchlight w/ Remote
    • Monitoring….. Maretron monitoring system
    • Including All: bilges, tanks, batteries, engine, fuel flow, smoke & heat, etc..
    • Viewed on any screen and remotely via Maretron N2K View
    • on boat networking… NMEA 2000 N2K dual backbone 2000 network throughout
    • Multiplexers for NMEA 0183 + RS432
    • Gateways via USB & IPG
    • Victron, and Maretron networks for monitoring
    • IP Cameras. Forward facing IP camera mounted on Skybridge roof
    • Aft Facing camera above swim step
    • Reolink Bullet IP camera engine room
    • Reolink Dome IP camera engine room
    • Video encoder. Axis Camera Encoder
    • WiFi Antenna. Microtik Groove 52 AC Wi-fi antenna
    • WiFi booster … WeBoost Drive Reach
    • Cellular antenna…….. Wilson Wide Band Omni-Directional Marine Antenna for cellular
    • ROUTER……. PepWave Max Transit Duo router
    • Network Access Storage. Synology NAS Disk Station w/ 2X 8 GB Seagate Barracuda drives

    Well, you get the idea, there is a LOT of moving parts to this puzzle.

    PXL_20210326_161615508And as you can see here, some of those moving parts are often crowded around Captain Christine at the Main Helm in this case!  Yunus on the far Right is the the manager of this connection and configuration team and Erdal with the toque in the middle is the lead technician and they have been a true treat to work with.
    PXL_20210327_055755582Some of the “moving parts” are blinking lights such as this set on the back of just three of our network switches in one of three “Internet Alcoves” as Christine calls them.  Strange though, we have “cut the cord” more than most people ashore and Isn’t it great that we are living in a wireless world!
    PXL_20210327_055813348Zooming out a bit of that alcove to show you that it really is quite small but it does have even more hardware!
    PXL_20210326_164225899Another very “wireless” alcove, this one behind the 50” monitor and home of Boat Computer #1 and the Synology NAS on the Left side of the Main Helm.
    PXL_20210327_120112773Out on the Aft Deck looking up at the Main Arch and the Tender Davit on the Left, to show you yet another very “wireless” area along the Arch where all of our external navigation and communication equipment resides.

    One eXciting milestone this week has been seeing that 6ft Open Array antenna spinning around for the first time on our Furuno FAR 1523 Radar!
    PXL_20210327_154137661.MPMy favorite Geekette, aka Capn’ Christine aka my Beautiful Bride, is a wee bit shy but I was able to at least get her hand in this shot as she tilts the two 19” LiteMax screens at the Main Helm to show how she now has TimeZero running charts on the Left and an awemazing amount of detail of the seabed below us thanks to our Furuno BBDS “Black Box Bottom Discriminating Sounder” where we can watch individual fish swimming below Möbius’ hull and details of the composition of the sea bead down to about 75 feet below the “top of the bottom”. 
    PXL_20210327_154243872.MPI will leave you with this shot of the view at your eye height when sitting in the Captain’s Chair here at the Main Helm.  Now, if we can just get past that sea wall …………………..

    Thanks for joining us again for another week in the adventure of Project Goldilocks.  Please be sure to leave any and all comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below and I hope you will join us again next week for what I hope will be the report of our first sea trials!  Wish us luck!  We will need it!

    -Wayne

    It’s ALIVE!!!!! Mr. Gee’s Birthday, March 6, 2021 XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update March 1-6, 2021

    Möbius completed her second week afloat and I’m delighted to report that we ARE still floating and not a drop of seawater inside thank you very much!  Christine and I spend all day aboard working our way through the still growing punch list of jobs for us and Team Möbius from Naval Yachts to work on and we sleep aboard each night for safety’s sake as she is still so new and the probability of some surprise that could endanger the boat will be high for the first month or so until we get all the systems up and running and fully tested. 

    So our routine is to get up at our usual 06:30 or so, walk the dogs and drive back to our apartment to make breakfast, shower, etc. and then head back to the boat.  We do the same at the end of the work day here, whenever that ends up being and drive back to the apartment for dinner and then back to the boat for the night.  It is working out well as a good way for us to start to familiarize ourselves with the boat’s systems and be here to help out the rest of Team Möbius with all their tasks to complete the work remaining to fully finish this beautiful boat.  We have a few more things that need to be done before Möbius is fully seaworthy and safe to take out on her first sea trial run and if things go well we hope to do that this coming week so do be sure to join us here again next week to find out if that happened and how the first test run went.

    As with the previous blog posts over the past month or so, I will do my best to cover the large range of “little” jobs that have been done so this will be more of the “fly through” style Show & Tell, where I will let the photos do most of the talking and just add a few comments for context and understanding.

    AND ………….  there is a special Bonus Video hot off the press from Captain Christine which will fully explain the references in this week’s title so be sure to hang in to the end for that!

    If you haven’t done so already, grab a tasty beverage and a comfy seat and let’s dive right into this week’s Update.

    Sing it with me ….. Möbius is her Name-O…

    PXL_20210305_142531357.MPSome of you might recall seeing Mobius’ name and her Port of Registration in the Bailiwick of Jersey in black letters several months ago, but those were just temporary stick-on vinyl letters that were required to complete the registration paperwork in Jersey.  This week the CNC cut aluminium letters finally showed up and Orhan and Ali quickly had them adhered to the Aft Transom wall for Captain Christine’s approval. 

    These letters are made out of 10mm thick aluminium and we will paint their outer surface Black for better visibility a bit later.  But it was another one of those little things that makes her feel more and more like a “real boat” as we slowly get used to the idea that “Did we actually DO this?!!!”

    * For the sharp eyed curious types, the little item above the E in Jersey is the bracket for for the door latch on the WT door behind Christine.

    And the vertical gravestone looking item with the donut hole in it is a fair lead for bringing lines aboard from shore or other ships and up to the big Lewmar power winch on the Aft deck.


    PXL_20210304_132121166Orhan (Left) and Ali arranged the letters on the Aft Deck so we could decide on final spacing before the mounted them.  Each letter of the boat’s name must be a minimum of 150mm/ 6” high to meet the Registration requirements of Jersey and most other countries and these are 180mm high.
    PXL_20210304_135715344Wood strip to line up the bottoms of each letter and some painter’s tape to keep them in place overnight while the Grey Sikaflex cured.
    PXL_20210304_145008724Jersey lettering is required to be at least 100mm / 4” high and ours are 120 / 4.75” so they all easily meet the size requirements and still seem to be in good proportions with the size of the Transom and Swim Platform.
    PXL_20210305_061730095Ooops!  Can’t forget the umlaut as that is the proper spelling of the Möbius strip which is a big part of the whole story behind why we chose this name.  

    For anyone not familiar with them a Möbius strip is a surface with only one side was discovered by the German mathematician Augus Ferdinand Möbius and hence the spelling.  If you have not previously played with Strip or it has been awhile, then do yourself a favor and try making one for yourself (quick How-To HERE) and playing with this seemingly impossible surface as you cut it in half and other fun experiments.

    ** The sharp eyed amongst you might have also noticed when my left hand appears in some of the photos here, that the the wedding rings I designed and had cast from 3D printed wax models I made are also a Möbius Strip.  But that’s a whole post in itself so I’ll leave that for later.


    PXL_20210305_061655278And here is the end result.

    Sorry I didn’t get a better shot after removing the painter’s tape from the two umlauts but I’ll try for one next week with a shot of the whole Aft end of Möbius.


    *** For the curious, the winch handle on the Left is used to open the two dogs that keep the AL door into our HazMat locker very tight and fully watertight.


    Hinged Front Solar Panel Rack

    PXL_20210301_124646348Uğur finished installing these two hinged support posts that keep the front three 345W solar panels propped up when we are at anchor and want these panels to be horizontal or parallel to the waterline for best solar performance.

    PXL_20210301_124650081The other key reason for propping up these 3 Solar Panels on this hinged rack is to create the giant wind tunnel which captures even the slightest breezes coming over out bow when at anchor and funnels it through the large Black vertical mist eliminator grill you can see at the far end.  After having most of the salty humidity removed by the Mist Eliminator grills this fresh air then fills a large plenum box above the ceiling in the center of the SuperSalon and is controlled via 5 diffusers in the ceiling panel which provides eXtremely good fresh air flow throughout the SuperSalon.
    PXL_20210301_124722059In the raised position, the hinged posts fit into one of these Delrin sockets and are secured by the SS bolt.
    PXL_20210301_124733876The tops of the posts are captured in this bracket with another SS Allen head bolt providing the hinge pin.
    PXL_20210301_124755911When we want to get ready to head back out to see, or in high winds, we just lift the panel up a few inches and the ball ends of the posts can slide aft as they fold down with the hinged rack.
    PXL_20210301_062307823.MPAnother one of the “Big little jobs” that got going this week was making the last 3 wooden liners that wrap around the inside AL surfaces of the 10 glass covered hatches on Möbius.  Seven of these wood liners have been done for many months now as they are all made out of Ro$ewood and were done when the rest of the Rosewood interior was being made. 
    PXL_20210301_062314490.MPThese last three on the Aft Deck which bring lots of light and fresh air into my Workshop will be appropriately made from laminated marine wood and then painted White. 
    PXL_20210301_062336633Here you can see how these wood frames are a snug fit inside the 10mm thick AL frames of the hatches.
    PXL_20210302_075401790Once each liner had been fully test fitted they were taken back to the Naval shipyard to finish them which included the two small cut-outs you can see in this photo for where the latches for the hatch handles will go.
    PXL_20210301_115740408The top edge of these wooden liners need help create the groove and support surface for the edge seals that ring each hatch and make them completely watertight no matter what Mother Nature and Mother Ocean throw at us, so they were cut and fitted as part of the hatch installation.
    Trim-Lok Hatch Seal Builder snipTrim-Lok is a very cool company that discovered after LOTS of research for the Goldilocks hatch seals.  Trim-Lok was great to work with via their excellent web site which allows you to design your own edge seals using their “Hatch Seal Product Builder” site so last year I had designed these edge seals as part of my overall design of the hatches themselves.
    PXL_20210301_123452853 You can see how these edge seals have two connected parts to them, the U shaped rubber channel pointing to the Right here is lined with aluminium U-shaped “staples” which allow the edge to stay flexible as it wraps around the tight corner radius at each corner of the Hatch Frame and still grips the 10mm AL edge.  The upper part on the Left here is the “bulb”, a hollow tube of EPDM rubber that provides the “squish” and the actual seal against the underside of the hatch lid and keeps all the water outside where it belongs.
    PXL_20210301_105007640This is one of the Rosewood liners that goes into the Guest Shower, if you will please pardon the mess of construction debris, you can see how the top edge of the wood liners form both the inner groove where the edge seal fits over the AL frame and how the flat top surfaces of both the AL frame and the wood liner provide a very solid surface for the bottom of the EPDM bulb to be sandwiched and squished tight when the top of the bulb is pushed down by the closed hatch lid.
    PXL_20210301_123425773Here is a closer shot during one of the test fittings so you can see how these seals work.

    This attention to such details and my decision to design my own hatches is all part of my overall obsession about keeping all the water on the OUTSIDE of the boat!  Our past experiences and that of most other sailors, has taught us that hatches are one of the prime culprits and most annoying of leaks on a boat so we set out to build some Goldilocks Just Right hatches that establish a strong fully watertight seal when closed and will stay that way for at least the next 10 years. 
    *** Check back in with me here in 2031 for an update on how well these worked.  For now though we are delighted with how well our hatches have turned out and in the coming week or so I will be able to show you the final step; mounting the custom designed hatch handles and latches.


    STEERING our Course to Freedom
    PXL_20210225_140913191.MP

    We left off last week with the beginning of the installation of the emergency manual steering wheel in the Main Helm and we finished that this week.  We regard this as an “emergency” or backup steering system as we have several layers of fault tolerance designed into our primary Kobelt steering system with dual redundant double acting hydraulic steering cylinders and dual redundant Accu-Steer HPU 400 24 volt hydraulic steering pumps.
    PXL_20210225_140924574

    A the very bottom here, you can see how the SS adaptor we machined bolts to the Vetus steering wheel and then slides over the SS shaft coming out of the Bronze Kobelt 7012 manual hydraulic steering pump above. 

    The majority of the time this wheel will be taken off and stored somewhere nearby the Helm by simply loosening those two SS machine screws that clamp the wheel adaptor to the pump shaft.
    PXL_20210301_062809875.MPThe elbow coming out of the top of the pump goes over to a 1 liter AL header tank we fabricated here and is mounted inside the triangular upper storage area on the Stbd/Right side of the Main Helm and keeps a steady “head” of hydraulic oil to feed this pump.
    PXL_20210301_062814138When you turn the steering wheel the pump forces hydraulic oil out one of the two valves on the rear of the pump where you see the two red handled ball valves here, and those hoses go all the way back to the cylinders attached through the Tiler Arm to the Rudder Shaft and the boat turns.
    PXL_20210217_090620686Way back in the Workshop we have been setting up and commissioning the two Accu-Steer HPU400 pumps, also owned by Kobelt, and this is a shot looking straight down at the Blue anodized AL manifold housing of the Stbd side HPU400.  These are 2Speed pumps so the two silver cylinders in the middle here are where you adjust the High/Low Speeds but this is rarely needs any adjustment.

    We have custom designed this whole steering system with Lance Lidstone and Keivan Ashouei and they have continued to provide us with outstanding support and assistance throughout the installation and now the setting up and commissioning of our whole steering system.


    FYI, at maximum conditions these pumps are set to put out 1000 PSI of hydraulic pressure that gives us much more than we need under even the most severe scenarios.  Just the way we like it and have designed all the systems onboard Möbius.


    PXL_20210303_034253211Keivan has been especially helpful via WhatsApp video calls at very early Am times for him and late PM for me.  when we had a few problems with the initial settings on some of the control valves which one of the installers on this end had changed from the factory pre-set positions without me knowing but it was an easy fix once we identified it. 

    We also had a bit of a setback when one of our more “burly” installers got a bit too aggressive when tightening down the SS bleeder screws, one of which you can see at the top of this cylinder.
    PXL_20210303_151839497These bleeder screws push a small SS check ball down against a seat machined as a chamfer in the brass end caps and if you don’t follow the Kobelt Installation Instructions (harrumph, harrumph!) and overtighten the bleeders more than the maximum 5 ft.lbs torque, they score a groove into the SS check ball as you can on this one.

    Difficult to photograph but if you look closely and click to enlarge this photo (works on all photos in all blog Post s BTW) you will be able to see the groove cut into this SS check ball by the SS bleeder screw.


    But as luck would have it and with the help of our “Turkish Fixer” Alaaddin, we were able to find a ball bearing that had the exact same 3.8mm diameter steel balls in it and by cutting this bearing open was able to end up with 7 brand new SS check balls!


    PXL_20210303_151503051To make matters much worse though, this excess force  and force the SS ball into the soft brass seat damaging it as well.  Easy to tell when this happens as the bleeder screw now leaks!  Even more difficult to photograph this but if you enlarge and look closely at the bottom of this threaded port for the bleeder screw, you will see how you can badly deformed the brass seat is here.
    PXL_20210304_163317469The solution I came up with was to remove the brass end caps as you see me doing here and then try to make a little tool that would cut a new seat in the brass and put it back to the original 118 degree angled chamfer.  I was too busy making this custom tool bit and machining the new seat to take any photos but the good news is that it all seemed to work well and I was able to machine new seats on all four end caps.


    PXL_20210305_120952128Tune in next week to find out if this all really does work when we reassemble all the cylinders and put all 1000 PSI into them and see if we have any leaks.

    Wish us luck!
    PXL_20210303_113823141One of the other BIG little jobs that Ramazan checked off this past week was the installation of our 10 different fire extinguishers that are spread throughout the whole boat.  We have doubled up on these as well with the one of the Right here being the traditional style most of you would be familiar with.
    PXL_20210303_113811666Then we have doubled up with these rather new and totally awemazing fire extinguishers from Maus in Sweden.  If you have not heard of these before please do check out the link above to the UK Maus site which has some very compelling video sequences showing how and how well these puppies work!


    Maus STIXX stripsIn particular check out the newest Maus STIXX “fire suppression Stickers” that will be going into each of our electrical panels as soon as we can get them delivered to us here in Turkey.

    And don’t just take my word for it, also check out John Harries excellent article on these Maus fire extinguishers in his incredibly valuable “Attainable Adventures” web site HERE.


    It’s ALIVE!!!

    OK, I’ve saved THE BEST for last this week and hope you too will find it worth the wait.  This is of course the reference to this week’s title and have you already guessed what this is all about?

    NO!  It is not in reference to the fact that Captain Christine says I bear a certain resemblance to Gene Wilder in this infamous scene from the fun movie Young Frankenstein.
    It's ALIVE Gene Wilder GIF

    PXL_20210302_071919501Will this clue help you guess?

    Hint; you are looking at the two high amp 24V cables going into Mr. Gee’s starter.
    PXL_20210306_140009745.MPHow about this clue?

    Yes, that is Mr. Gee’s engine coolant water temperature gauge.

    Hint: check out the temperature even if it is a bit blurry.
    Obvious right??!!!!!

    Ahhhh, heck, why don’t you just watch the fun even by playing the short little video clip below that Christine just finished putting together as that will be MUCH better than my belaboured and boring explanation.

    Click PLAY below and enjoy!




    That’s right!  He’s ALIVE!!!!!!!

    After a gestation period of almost 5 years and a LOT of work along the way to fully restore this 1971 Gardner 6LXB marine engine to his original if not better than factory new condition, Mr. Gee has been “reborn” and his newest “Birth Day” is now March 6th, 2021.

    It all went down just as you see in the video above.  After topping Mr. Gee up with fresh water, oil, diesel fuel, saltwater cooling heat exchangers and priming his fuel injection system, he lit up on first crank, first time!  I’m not even going to start telling you more as I won’t be able to stop myself from going on and on and on, even more than I usually do if that is within the realm of believability.  Instead I’ll just let you enjoy the video as I go join my Beautiful Bride and Captain Christine as we enjoy this MAJOR Milestone for us and we toast Mr. Gee’s Birth Day and wish that he will start up first time every time during his next lifetime and ours.

    -Wayne