Are we finally ready to throw off the dock lines?!?! XPM78-01 Möbius Update 9-14 May, 2022

A day late in getting out this weekly update and I will keep it short but it has been both a very busy and successful week as we get closer and closer to our “throw off the dock lines” day.  Lots and lots of jobs on the “Must be done before departure” list have been getting checked off and if all goes well today we hope to leave tomorrow! 

Christine has been busy with electronics and computer related jobs onboard getting all six of our monitors working properly with the Upper and Lower Helm computers, getting internet connectivity sorted out for when we are underway and going up the coast of Turkey towards Marmaris and just playing that always fun version of Whack-a-Mole as each new “Mole” pops up.  I’ve been busy getting the Tender and the Davit system ready to launch and yesterday we both worked on bringing 500kg/1100lbs of lead pellets aboard that are now safely ensconced  inside the watertight coffer dams on either side which are there for the potential future addition of active stabilizers.  But I’m getting ahead of myself so let’s jump in with a quick Show & Tell of what all we’ve been working on this past week.

IMG_0878Our workload has been reduced a bit with the addition of a new member of Möbius’ Crew, this little turtle who is one of many we regularly see around Möbius and inside the Finike marina.  Turns out he just LOVES eating the green grassy growth that is already starting to appear along our black boot stripe and is a real pain to scrub off. 
As you may recall we hauled out a few weeks ago and gave our InterSleek “Foul Release” silicone based bottom paint a close inspection and found it to be just fabulous with almost no growth at all after almost a full year in the water with very little movement.  However the black boot stripe above the bottom paint and waterline is a different story and this area which is kept constantly wet as the water moves up and down the hull a bit and is getting lots of sunshine all day long is the perfect garden for the “green slime” and grass like plants that grow here.  No big deal for the boat really, just annoying and so we were delighted to find that we now had this new crewmember who likes nothing more than to munch away on the grass.  Thanks buddy, we can use all the help we can get.  Not sure about getting his visa for leaving Finike and Turkey but we’ll see.

Loading Lead

IMG_20210428_105421As I mentioned earlier I got a good workout yesterday carrying 500 kg of these tiny lead pellets which we had purchased last year and have been sitting in a Bulk Bag on the dock behind Möbius.  Christine worked on the dock to transfer about 40kg/88lbs of pellets into thick plastic bags that were then double bagged inside some heavy duty bulk bags which I then carried onto Möbius and down into the Basement under the SuperSalon.  I had previously unbolted and removed the watertight cover plates over the two coffer dams on either side about midship on the hull which we had built just in case we decide in the future to add active stabilizers, most likely Magnus Effect type to help reduce roll more than our paravanes do. 
For now though, these watertight compartments made the ideal spot to put these lead pellets and improve the comfort of the ride by slowing down our otherwise “snappy” roll resistance.  Working with Dennis our NA, we set up one of the design criteria for the hull to have a roll period that would have slightly less than the theoretically ideal roll period which is the time a ship takes from upright position to going to a particular angle on port side and then going to a angle on starboard side and then again returning back to upright position (zero list position) during natural rolling.  We did this way so that we could dial in the Goldilocks roll period after the boat was built and fully loaded up to our actual weight/displacement.  A shorter or faster roll rate provides more safety of returning the boat to upright but this faster or “snappier” motion can induce some nausea for some people and make crossings in rolly conditions less comfortable for the crew.  Slowing down the roll is relatively easy to do by adding some weight/ballast that is further outboard and higher up than the centerline ballast, whereas speeding it up is very difficult once the boat is built.  Hence we purposely went for a slightly faster roll period in the hull design knowing that we can then add some lead in the best locations once we have the boat in the water and in her natural trim and weight.  So we will now operate Möbius with this additional 500kg of lead in the coffer dams which puts it well outboard of center and a bit higher up at just below the waterline, and se how this slightly slower roll rate feels and works for us.  If we want to make further adjustments either way we can either remove or add more lead.

Being in small pellet form makes it easy to fill any size and shape spot we want and we are keeping them in these double bags for now so we can change if needed.  Once we think we have the ballast and roll period at the just right, just for us Goldilocks point, then I will remove remove the bags of lead pellets, coat the aluminium with epoxy resin and then pour the lead pellets back into these spaces.  Then I will pour some thickened epoxy over the top surface to fully encase the lead with the hull and keep it fully sealed to prevent any water from mixing with it which could set up some dissimilar metal corrosion.

As you might imagine this was a job that we were both very happy to check off the list and while we were certainly pooped at the end of the day we had big smiles on our faces and treated ourself to a “date night” of sorts and went out for dinner at the little café here in the marina.

Finishing the Tender Console

The other much larger job that got checked off the ToDo list this week was getting our tender we’ve named Möbli launched off the Aft Deck and into the water for the first time.

PXL_20220511_103729569I spent the first few days of last week finishing up the last of the wiring that connects the Yanmar 4JH4 HTE 110HP engine to the Castoldi 224DD jet drive and the control panel and gauges for both in the center console.  This Yanmar/Castoldi combination is a purposely matched pair and the two companies created a very complete kit package that provided all the custom wiring harnesses to plug into both the engine and the jet drive and connect these into the supplied instrument panel that is now mounted in the console. 
PXL_20220507_154630029Most of these connections were done with very high quality quick connect watertight fittings but there were a few wires that I needed to look after to connect to the 12V AGM battery. 
PXL_20220402_153959365A bit time consuming but not too difficult and this is how it looks so far.
PXL_20220403_124342482I’m very happy with how this has turned out so far and will work on getting the Standard Horizon VHF and Vesper AIS wired up after we launch and test Möbli out.

Fueling up

PXL_20220513_113748356One more detail was to install the fuel filler cap in the cover of the 80 liter fuel tank up in the bow.  I had previously installed the rubber fuel lines that run under the floor and back to the Yanmar so now I just needed to remove the cover plate, drill the hole for the filler cap and bolt that back down.  Put in 15 liters of diesel for now and she should now be ready to start up for the first time. 


Möbli Launches!

First though, we need to get Möbli into the water so there is sea water supply for the engine’s heat exchangers for engine oil and fresh water coolant and for the wet exhaust system.

PXL_20220422_114808734Most of you will have seen in some previous updates a few weeks ago that I had all the rigging for raising and lowering the Tender inside the Davit Arch as well as rotating the Arch itself to launch the Tender over the Port side.
PXL_20220421_141850258A pair of triple blocks provide a 6:1 mechanical advantage for the Tender Lifting lines that go to the winch you see here on the vertical leg of the Davit Arch.
PXL_20220421_141858103.MPInside the Tender at each corner there is a welded in attachment point where the Lift Line snaps into.
PXL_20220422_120336369Then there is a separate set of rigging that controls the pivoting of the Arch itself so that it moves the Tender sideways off the deck clear of the rub rails and then the Lift Lines are let out to lower the Tender down into the water.
PXL_20220422_114802065This Pivot Control Line of PCL leads through 3 blocks and then over to the bit Lewmar 65 electric winch which allows you to rotate the Arch out and back in.
PXL_20220513_141706186With that all hooked up it was launch time and little Möbli was soon testing out the waters beside Möbius.
PXL_20220513_141713223.MPShe sits pretty much right on the waterline predicted in the 3D model which was good to confirm and put the exhaust pipe a bit more than 150mm above the water.  I could then hop in and start it up and was delighted when the Yanmar fired up at the first touch of the start button.  Must have been taking lessons from Mr. Gee!

So an eXtremely big milestone for us and puts us in position to head out to sea in the next few days.
Of course these are boats and so there are always those pesky little Moles that pop up and need to be whacked down.  Two popped up with the Tender; there is a small pinhole leak where the Castoldi bolts up to the bottom of the hull and then the larger issue is some problems with the Davit Arch setup that will take more time to “whack” down.  The leak is very minor and slow but to be safe I didn’t want to take it out for a test run but I was able to run the engine for about 20 minutes and test out the steering and bucket controls on the jet drive while Möbli was tied up to Möbius and get the oil and coolant up to operating temperature.  All of that checked out perfectly; ran well, oil pressure and temperature were right one, steering and bucket control which is how a jet drive directs the thrust of the jet to move the boat forward, reverse and sideways.  So VERY pleased with how the Tender turned out and can’t wait for that first test drive which will hopefully be in a few weeks.

For now though, the Tender is back in the chocks on the Aft Deck and all lashed down and covered ready for us to head out to sea.

Christine is working on a video collage of building and launching the Tender so watch for that to go live here in the next few days.

We still have a few small jobs to get done but right now it is looking good that we will be able to finally throw off those dock lines some time tomorrow and leave Finike in our wake as we start working our way up the Turquoise coast towards Marmaris.  As usual we are on The No Plan Plan so we will take our time and enjoy stopping wherever calls our name as we motor up this beautiful coastline.  We think we will use Marmaris as our jumping off point to check out of Turkey and head over the explore some of the Greek islands in June.  Then we have our two granddaughters, with their pesky parents who seem to insist on coming along (just kidding Lia & Brian!) flying in to spend most of the month of July with us so that’s the ultimate prize that is driving us forward from here and a BIG part of what we have build Möbius for so we can’t wait for their return to join us aboard and make more memories together as we explore Greece and perhaps Italy.

As always, thanks for taking time to join us here and please keep those comments and questions coming by typing them into the “Join the Discussion” box below and with luck I’ll be sending the next update from some beautiful anchorage between here and Marmaris.

-Wayne


Tender Wiring XPM78-01 Möbius Update 2-7 May, 2022

First and foremost my best and biggest wishes to all the Moms out there!  Every day should be Mother’s Day in my opinion so I hope this is just an extra special day for all of you extra special people.

The past week has been filled with a litany of little jobs for the most part and nothing too visual to show you so I’ll keep this short so as not to take up much time on Mother’s Day or better yet, don’t bother reading till later this week.

Christine and I are inching closer and closer to the day when we finally throw off the dock lines here at Setur Marina in Finike and begin our adventures making our way up the Turkish coast a bit and then start making our way West across the Med this summer. If all goes well we hope to take off in about two weeks as we whittle the To List down more each day.  Thanks to the help of the great people at Electrodyne and WakeSpeed I think we have found the causes of the one alternator and regulator that are not working properly and have the new parts being put together to be shipped out next week.  With us about to become “moving targets” with no fixed address I will need to figure out how and where best to get these parts delivered to us but after so many years out sailing the world this is a very common problem for us and we always manage to find a way to get boat parts and boat united.

PXL_20210508_142134749 One of the big things I need to get done before we take off is getting our Tender “Mobli” finished and running and also be able to test out launching and retrieving him with our Davit Arch system.  So in addition to working on some of the remaining To Do items such as tracking down some new gremlins in our Shore Power setup, I have been trying to stay focused on getting Mobli finished.
PXL_20220430_141100157Last week you saw me finish installing the wet exhaust system and I’m waiting the arrival of two more hose clamps to finish that completely and that leaves just the electrical wiring to be fully completed.  So as per the title, wiring was the focus this week.
PXL_20220507_154630029Christine has been my trusted parts finder and delivery person tracking down the parts and supplies I need to complete the work on the Tender.  She has taking taking full advantage of her fabulous new eBike to pick up parts available here in our little town of Finike or take the 2 hour bus ride down to the big city of Antalya to bring back parts from there.  One of those items was a 12 volt AGM battery and battery box which I now have solidly mounted on this shelf I created using some leftover composite grid that we used for the flooring in the ER, Workshop and Forepeak.

I had several of these large Red Battery Switches from Blue Sea left over from building Möbius and so I installed two of these.
PXL_20220507_154622505.MPthat This under seat area is easy to access, fully protected, easy to lock up and keeps the weight well centered so this seemed like the best location for the battery. 
PXL_20220507_152943165I installed the second battery switch in the Engine Bay on the opposite side of the AL bulkhead under the seat.  This isn’t really necessary but provides a very secure anti-theft device when turned off and the Engine Bed lid is locked.  We would not likely need to use it very often so it will just be left on most of the time but will be good to have if we ever need to leave the Tender ashore for long periods of times or we are unsure of the security ashore.
PXL_20220507_152949264.MPThe primary 12V positive 1/0 size Red cable goes from this switch under the Yanmar engine and connects directly to ….
PXL_20220503_153811831… this stud on the starter solenoid.  A bit tight to get to but it is now on and well tightened.
PXL_20220507_152938918The other smaller Red AWG 8 gauge cable comes off the same switch and goes back to the jet drive along with the other wiring for the jet drive and the two Black hydraulic hoses for steering the jet drive.
PXL_20220507_152922879The steering is also hydraulic but is manually powered by turning the steering wheel.  The hydraulic pump that raises and lowers the jet drive’s bucket is electric so that Red cable goes to this 50 Amp breaker which feeds power to the pump behind it.  There is also the same size Black negative cable that runs from the engine ground to the bronze stud you can see in the center of this shot.
PXL_20220507_152934488Some nylon zip ties help keep all the wiring and hydraulic hoses in place and well protected and with that the wiring inside the Engine Bay is now pretty much complete.  Just need to add engine oil, coolant and hydraulic fluid and this should be ready to fire up as soon as we launch the Tender and have it in the water needed for the wet exhaust and heat exchangers.
PXL_20220402_154030638Next week I will move back to the console to finish connecting the Castoldi jet drive wire harness to the Yanmar harness.
PXL_20220507_111327451That leaves me with these 8 wires that connect to the ignition and starter switches and the bucket position gauge which I hope to get done next week.
PXL_20210505_073322984.MPDepending on if I get the remaining parts in time and finish all the wiring, we may be able to launch Mobli over the side next week and fire him up so be sure to tune in again next week to see all that.
Thanks as always for joining us again this week and be sure to leave your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  They are all VERY much appreciated!

Now, let’s all get back to reminding all the Moms in our lives how awemazing they are!

-Wayne

An eXhausting Week XPM78-01 Möbius Update 25-30 April, 2022

Another week and another month fly by in a flash it seems but we are making good progress and cutting the dock lines from here in beautiful sunny Finike Marina is getting closer with each passing day.  This week also felt like summer is definately on its way with day time temp yesterday getting up to a new high of 29C/84F so we tropical birds are loving this change.

Nothing too visually exciting for this week’s Show & Tell update unfortunately but I’ll do my best to get you caught up on what all we did get done this past week of April 25-30, 2022.

Decks are Done!

One of the larger jobs that we are very thankful to have finished is that the team from Naval finished redoing all the TreadMaster on all our decks. 

IMG_0667Despite being very high quality, the West Systems epoxy that was used to affix all the sheets of TreadMaster to the AL decks had not adhered to the AL very well so it has become both an eyesore and a tripping danger.  
PXL_20220425_081917085They carefully removed each panel of TM, sanded the AL down, applied Bostik Primer and then Bostik adhesive and glued them all back down with rollers.

Apologies for not having any photos of the completed decks but you get the idea.

Charging Issues

PXL_20210105_141245947When my friend John was here two weeks ago we finished setting up and configuring the two WakeSpeed 500 regulators which control the two Electrodyne 250 Amp @ 24V alternators.

This upper Electrodyne is powered off of Mr. Gee’s crankshaft with a toothed “timing” belt.

The six large red cables carry the AC current from each alternator over to the Electrodyne Rectifiers which are mounted outside of the ER.
Cogged Belt Pulley Fusion screenshotDifficult to photograph this drive system I designed so this rendering of my CAD models will show it much better.  Crankshaft pulley is at the bottom, sea water pump on the left and Electrodyne in the upper right.  Works out eXtremely well as there is zero chance of any slippage of these toothed belts and I put in a spring loaded idler pulley (not shown in this render) which keeps the tension just right all the time.
Electrodyne #2 jack shaft labelledAlso difficult to photograph now all the floors are in the Engine Room, the lower Electrodyne is powered directly off of the PTO or Power Take Off that is on the lower left side of Mr. Gee.  An eXtremely robust and almost maintenance free setup as well.
PXL_20210830_112735339This older photo when Mr. Gee was up in the air shows how this PTO drive works.
IMG_20200515_190541I went with these massively large and strong Electrodyne alternators in large part because they use an external Rectifier which is what you see here. 
IMG_20201007_130735The diodes in the rectifier are where the majority of the  heat comes from in an alternator and heat is the enemy of electrical efficiency so keeping them out of the alternator and out of the ER really helps to increase the lifespan and efficiency of the whole charging system.
PXL_20210830_112422607Each Rectifier is then connected to one of the WakeSpeed 500 Smart Regulators and each WS500 is interconnected with the white Ethernet cable you see here. 

Connecting these two WS500’s is a big part of what makes them deservedly called “smart” because they then automatically figure out how to perfectly balance the charging from each alternator which can otherwise be quite difficult and prone to errors.
IMG_20200515_131855However, the biggest reason these WS500’s are the first truly ‘Smart’ regulators is because they use both Voltage AND Amperage do monitor the batteries and adjust the alternators to produce the just right amount of charging. 
IMG_20200515_190603With everything all wired up we started up Mr. Gee and after the initial ramp up time we were soon seeing about 220 Amps going into the 1800 Ah House Battery which was a joy to see.


Electrodyne x2 paintedHaving two of these Electrodyne 250Ah alternators give us the potential for up to 12kW of electrical charging so in a way we actually do have a “generator” onboard.
Unfortunately we soon noticed that some of the 24V circuit breakers were tripping when these alternators were running and I’ve spent the past few weeks trying to figure out what was causing that.  Thanks to exemplary help from both Dale at Electrodyne and Neil at WakeSpeed, both of whom have been fabulous to work with from the very beginning, I was eventually able to track down the problem to an incorrectly installed aluminium bar that was used to fasten the two halves of the Electrodyne Rectifiers.  One end of this AL flat bar was touching one of the AL L-brackets that hold the studs and diode in the Rectifier.  Once found the fix was pretty quick and easy. 

However somewhere along the way one of the WS500’s stopped working so I am now working with Neil to sort that out.  In the meantime we have up to 250Ah charging capacity from the one working Electrodyne/WS500 combo and with all the solar power we have coming out of our 14 solar panels, we have no need for any of it most of the time.

Exhausting work on Tender Mobli

Most of my time this week was spent finishing off the installation of the Yanmar 4JH4 HTE 110HP engine and Castoldi 224DD jet drive in our Tender that we have named “Mobli”.

Similar to Mr. Gee and most marine engines, the Yanmar uses a wet exhaust where sea water is injected into the exhaust gas after it exits the turbocharger.  This water dramatically drops the temperature of the exhaust gasses so you can use rubber and fiberglass exhaust hoses to carry the gases and water out of the boat.
You can see the primary components I’m using to build the exhaust system in the photo below;
PXL_20220430_092530094water injection elbow on the Yanmar on the far Left with the Black rubber exhaust hose with the yellow stripe to carry the exhaust gas and water down to the cylindrical water muffler in the upper left.
PXL_20220430_130201688I will use the two white RFP 90 degree elbows to carry the water/gas up and out of the boat through the 76mm/3” AL pipe on the right.
PXL_20220430_141107025Like this.
PXL_20220430_141100157I am waiting for more of the SS hose clamps to arrive but this is what the finished setup will look like.  Will need to fabricate and install a bracket to hold the muffler in place as well and that will complete the exhaust system.

Hard to see (click to expand any photo) but I was also able to install the black rubber hose that you see running parallel to the left of the exhaust hose and muffler.  This carries the cooling sea water from the housing of the Castoldi Jet drive up to the intake on the sea water pump on the left side of the Yanmar.


PXL_20220430_141118761Last major job to complete the installation of the Yanmar/Castoldi propulsion system is the mounting of the battery and its cables to both the jet drive and the engine and I hope to get that done this coming week.
That’s how I spent my last week of April 2022 and hope yours was equally productive. 

Thanks for taking the time to follow along, always encouraging to know you are all out there and along for the ride with Christine and me.  Thanks in advance for typing any and all comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below and hope you will join us again next week as we get May off to a good start.

-Wayne

Back on Anchor at Last! 9-16 April 2022 Update XPM78-01 Möbius

Christine and I took some much needed time away from boat projects to spend time wtih some dear friends who flew in and stayed aboard Möbius with us.  So as you might have noticed I did not manage to get a blog post up last week and hope you enjoyed that break as well!  John and his wife Michelle and their four kids are full time live aboards on their Lagoon 500 sailing catamaran which they just crossed the Atlantic on and are now enjoying time in the Caribbean. 

John is an eXtremely experienced sailor so having him aboard was a huge help for both Christine and I to have someone like this to bounce ideas off and join forces in our problem solving.  Even better, John and I had a few days together by ourselves while Christine flew up to Istanbul to show his daughter Genna “Christine’s Istanbul” as she has become one of its best tour guides from all her previous times there. 

DJI_0024When we all reunited on Möbius we set out for a few days and sailed up to a beautiful little anchorage off the village of Kekova and I’ll show you a bit more about that in a moment.

PXL_20220409_073355908Truth be told, we did spend some time working on boat projects as we took full advantage of tapping into John’s extensive expertise and experience to get his thoughts on several of the projects we have underway as well as some ongoing problems we are trying to sort out. John and family are huge fans of catamarans, and justly so as a family of six most often with other guests aboard but John did admit to a wee bit of Engine Room and Workshop envy while he was here.

Otherwise, not too much in the way of the usual Show & Tell for me to share with you about boat work the past two weeks although I did manage to finish installing the hydraulic steering in our Tender Mobli and this coming week I hope to get back to work on him with installation of the fuel lines, exhaust system and other items needed to be able to start Mobli up and take him out for some sea trials. 

However I may not make too much progress on that as we are going to be hauling Möbius out tomorrow morning as a haul out is included in our annual contract here at Setur Marina and so  we thought it would be smart to take advantage of the opportunity to fully inspect everything below the waterline, see how well the InterSleek foul release bottom paint has been working after a year in the water and see how the anodes/zincs are doing.  Having a slick and slippery bottom and prop will help us get a great start as we finally head back out to sea and out of the Med.

A to Z; the Zen of being at Anchor

The last time we had been on anchor with Möbius was this past June when our two Granddaughters (and their parents) spent the month with us here in Turkey so it was ear to ear grins as we fired up Mr. Gee and headed out to spend a few days with John and Genna aboard and explore a new anchorage just up the coast from us here in Finike. 


PXL_20220409_093152810This is the view as we head out of Finike Marina and some of the mountains that surround us.
PXL_20220409_093228478~2Genna was hard at work on deck as we left.
PXL_20220409_095703051.MPMeanwhile, John was too busy practicing his rendition of the scene in the movie Titanic but we all have our parts to play right?
PXL_20220409_093430385We have been using out swim ladder with a plank of wood lashed to it for our passerelle to get on/off Möbius while tied up at the marina so we just folded it up for the trip and we were off! 

This is our wake at about 7.5 knots with Mr. Gee turning about 1300 RPM.
PXL_20220410_145440483Captain Christine did all the piloting while I kept a close eye on Mr. Gee and all the systems as we continue to put on more nautical smiles and hours.
PXL_20220409_110918271 Here she has up up to about 8 knots with Mr. Gee turning about 1300 RPM and burning just a bit less than 19 L/hr or 5 USG/hr which works out to be about 2.4 L/nm or 0.63 USG/nm which we are quite happy with as we slowly break in Mr. Gee and perhaps more so ourselves on this eXtremely new and unique boat for us to sailors.
PXL_20220410_142816038This was the view off our stern as the Captain moved us up to about 8.8 knots @ 1440 RPM consuming about 20.4 L/hr 5.4 USG/hr so about 2.3 L/nm 0.61 USG/nm.  Mr. Gee is currently set for 100% or Continuous duty cycle at 150 HP @ 1650 RPM so he still has some room left to go and we will keep moving up to this as we put on more miles and collect all this kind of data to see where the sweet spot is.

For now though, we think this wake at almost 9 knots is pretty sweet!
PXL_20220409_114851572Sweeter still was this view passing the castle above the village of Kekova.
PXL_20220410_045251445as we headed for this lovely little anchorage.
PXL_20220409_122230625.MPOnly one other boat was there and we anchored a good ways back from him for some mutual privacy.
PXL_20220409_120120890Always time for one more project right?  Just before we put the anchor down John and I installed the new Mantus SS swivel between the anchor chain and our 110Kg/242lb Rocna anchor.  We had tried it without the swivel but I had overdesigned the AL anchor rollers a bit and machined a groove in them that kept the chain very snug but would not allow it to rotate at all which made bringing the anchor aboard a bit difficult at times. 
PXL_20220409_120329488I’ve been very impressed with how well Mantus makes these swivels and have complete confidence in it and will SWAN, Sleep Well at Night with this no problem. 

One more boat job checked off the list!
PXL_20220410_045233012And how much better a spot to sleep can you find than this?!
PXL_20220410_071456859Never content with just one Captain’s hat, Christine decided this was also the perfect opportunity for her to get some more air miles on our drone.
DJI_0017Which allowed her to get shots like this.  Almost surrealist as it almost looks like it is too good to be real and must be a rendering.

Click to enlarge this or any other photo to see at full resolution.
DJI_0019But this was as real as it gets with John, Christine and me enjoying this sunny day in complete silence other than the bells on the goats scrambling on the rocks ashore.
And lucky you, Christine has just quickly put together this video montage of some of her drone video and some from John’s camera as he enjoyed exploring more of Möbius.



Hope you enjoyed this more scenic blog post this week and that you will join us again next week when we will report on what we found when we hauled Möbius out after her first 14 months in the water after the initial launch.  And please do add any comments or questions in the ‘”Join the Discussion” box below.

Thanks!

Wayne

Close but ….. Update Jan 31-Feb 5, 2022 XPM78-01 Möbius

As has been the norm for most updates and perhaps life in general I guess, this will be a mix of good news and bad for all you faithful followers (thanks to you all!)  In the good news column this week’s update will be mercifully short compared to some of the novel length ones I have been writing of late but the related not so good news is that this update will be disappoint all of you who have been anxiously awaiting to see and hear Mr. Gee roar back to his third new lease on life. 

The finiteness of time is always the challenge it seems, and especially so on a boat it seems where there are so many things on the To Do list and so little time to get all of them done.  I’m pretty sure most of you have your own version of this dilemma, which is actually a good thing in itself in that who would ever want to have NOTHING left on their To Do list?!?!?  Not me at least.

So this past week has been filled with a litany of To Do list items which too precedent over those in Mr. Gee’s Engine Room (ER) though I certainly did not ignore him completely. 

Getting Mr. Gee Ready for Life #3

PXL_20220130_110112852If you have been following along, here is what things looked like in the ER when I left you in the last Update.  Mr. Gee was back “in bed” with his four “feet” now resting firmly on the wide 25mm thick AL Engine Beds that run down each side of the Engine Bay.  Now came all the “little things” that have to be reconnected, adjusted and tested before he is ready to start.

As many of you can relate to, the “little things” in life can often take most of the time and are of the highest importance and that is very much the case here.
PXL_20201027_161424326For example, before I can fasten the Mr. Gee’s four feet to the Engine Beds, I need to precisely align these two flanges.  The bright Red one on the Right is attached to the end of the Nogva Prop Shaft and the darker Burgundy on it mates to is the Output flange coming out of the Nogva servo gear box on the far Left.
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualThese two flanges must be perfectly aligned axially, meaning both side to side and top to bottom with no more than 5/100th or 0.05mm/0.002”  which for reference is about the thickness of a human hair.
To do this, I need to remove the eight hardened bolts which hold the two flanges together, keep the two flanges up against each other and then measure the gap all around where the flanges meet to make sure there is ideally no gap or at least no more than 0.05mm.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPThis is done using a feeler gauge you see in my hand here which is a thin piece of steel that is of an exact thickness.  It was close but a bit too big on the Right side (3 O’clock) so I then go up to the front of Mr. Gee and pry his feet over to the Right just a wee bit and go recheck the size of the gap.  If there is a gap top to bottom then you have to use the nuts on the motor mounts to tilt the engine/gearbox assembly to remove the gap.
PXL_20210629_080936243As you might imagine, it takes quite a few trips back and forth to get the two flanges completely flush with each other and once done I could replace the 8 hardened bolts and tighten them down in stages to their final toque of 160 NM/120 FtLbs, which is VERY tight.
PXL_20201112_065937889With Mr. Gee & Miss Nogva now perfectly in position, I could install the two hardened bolts in each of his four “feet” and torque these down to the very grunt worthy 225 NM/166 FtLbs.

Note, this is a photo from last year before I had drilled the holes in the Engine Beds so this time I just needed to reinsert the bolts into the existing holes.
Gardner & Nogva mounts screen shotHere is an overview shot from my Fusion 360 screen which is what I used to design all the mounts.  Each side has two feet/mounts for Mr. Gee and one for the Nogva.
PXL_20220131_093700868With Mr. Gee now in his final resting spot I could reattach the wet exhaust system.  Wet refers to the fact that sea water is injected into the exhaust gas which removes both noise and heat from the exhaust and allows the use of much easier to handle rubber exhaust hose to take the exhaust gasses out of the boat.

The Blue/Red is special silicone hose where the stainless Mixing Elbow bends downward and mixes the sea water with the exhaust.  The smaller SS pipe you can see pointing up here, is where the hose bringing the sea water attaches.
PXL_20220131_093706908Here is a peek inside the mixing elbow where you can see all the holes around the outer SS circumference where the water sprays evenly into the exhaust gasses.
PXL_20220131_155437345Now I could hoist the whole exhaust pipe assembly into place sliding the Blue silicone hose overtop of the angled input pipe on the large cylindrical Silencer/Separator in the top Separator of the ER.

Once in place I could also reattach the four SS supports which connect the exhaust system to the front and rear roll bars around Mr. Gee.  This has worked out eXtremely well by keeping the exhaust system very tightly in place with no transfer of noise of vibration into the hull it never touches.


PXL_20220131_1554136033” SS pipe attaches to the exhaust manifold on the Aft Starboard/Right end of Mr. Gee and then carries the hot exhaust gasses up and over to the SS mixing elbow and into the Silencer/Separator.
PXL_20220131_155420518The Black rubber exhaust hose curving down from the Silencer on the Right carries the now cooled and quiet gasses out of the ER and across to the AL exhaust pipe in the hull.

The sea water drains out of the bottom of the White separator and into the vertical Sea Chest where it exits out of the boat back into the ocean.


It has proven to be an eXcellent exhaust system; simple, efficient and quiet.  I’ve used a Silencer/Separator combo unit rather than a more traditional “Lift Muffler” as this design has almost no power robbing back pressure and no “sploosh sploosh” as water from lift mufflers create when exhaust and water both exit out the side of the boat.


PXL_20220202_143954022Time at last to install the new oil filter and fill it up with clean new oil.
PXL_20220202_152612105The rest of Mr. Gee’s 28 Liters/ 7.4 USG of engine oil I add by pouring into the two cylinder heads to thoroughly douse all the valves in clean new oil which then drains down to fill up the oil sump/pan.
PXL_20220202_152645743Lots more “little jobs’ such as reconnecting the six large Red cables to each of the two 500 amp Electrodyne alternators you can see on the top and bottom Left side here. 


The list of connections is much longer of course and valve clearances need to be set, fuel pump and injectors primed, etc. but each one takes Mr. Gee one step closer to first start up.
Unfortunately I ran out of time this week at this point so I will need to leave you hanging here and pick up again next week.

Engine Control Box

I do my best to “discipline” myself when doing boat jobs to always try to improve on whatever system I’m working on such that it is better than before I started.  Such was the case in completing this latest rebuild of Mr. Gee where I wanted to build and install a much better and safer Engine Control Box.

PXL_20220205_103827384.MPHere is what I came up with.  Quite simple but a bit time consuming to build.  I started with a standard IP65 (waterproof) Grey plastic junction box and cut openings for an Engine Hour meter (top), Red STOP button, power “ignition” switch Left, Green START button Right and digital Tachometer on bottom.
PXL_20220205_103836374.MPThe junction box provided a cool, dry protected spot to make all the connections for these controls so I used these handy junction blocks to make secure connections between all the wires.
PXL_20220206_111545538.MPThen I mounted the whole box up high just outside the ER door. 

I’ve done my best to reserve the Engine Room to have ONLY the engine inside it;  no other equipment, no batteries, no fuel tanks, etc.  An ER is a great place for the engine but the hotter temperatures and vibration is not so kind to things like batteries, equipment, etc.


PXL_20220206_111615811Here is a better shot of the Control Box in the upper center as you look forward down the Port/Left side of the Workshop to the WT door at the far end which separates the Workshop & ER from the interior of the boat.

By mounting this control box outside the ER followed the same thinking and added a safety element in that I could quickly shut down the engine in the unlikely event of seeing a fire inside and not needing to open the ER door.
PXL_20220206_111811733For orientation on how the ER and the new Control Box is mounted, here is the opposite view looking Aft from that WT Door toward the WT door leading out onto the Swim Platform at the far Left end. 
PXL_20220206_111701216.MPThe whole Control Box setup and other wiring is still very much a work in progress as you can see with this perspective from inside the ER looking out through the door on the Left.  In the upper center of this photo you can see how the wires from the Control Box have been led through a hole in the White AlucoBond walls lining the ER. 

Off to the right I’ve mounted a new BlueSea junction box which provides me with 12 individually fused connections for each circuit.
PXL_20220206_111654233.MPNext week I will be working on making all the connections for circuits such as the Start/Stop solenoids, Sea Water flow alarm, hot water circulation pump from engine to calorifier, engine sensors for pressures and temperatures and connections for the field wires from the alternators to the WakeSpeed 500 remote rectifiers and regulators.

I’ve had great success using these BS junction boxes on previous boats and they do a great job of making secure, neat easily accessed connections and fuses.
There were a LOT of other To Do list items commandeering my time this past week but I’ll spare you from all those gory details and leave off here to be continued next week for those of you brave enough to return for more!

My sincere thanks to those who made it to the end of yet another “brief” update from your cub reporter aboard the Good Ship Möbius.  I value all the comments and questions you leave in the “Join the Discussion” box below eXtremely highly so thanks in advance for all those contributions and I hope you will join me here again for continuing adventures as Christine and I work at getting Möbius and ourselves fully sea worthy and ready to throw off the dock lines and head back out to eXplore the world by sea.

-Wayne



Putting Mr. Gee Back to (his engine) Bed! Weekly Update 30 Jan 2022 XPM78-01 Möbius

Thanks to the many of you who responded to the “mystery novel” that I turned last week’s update into and for putting up with my amateurish mystery writing skills.  I was quite taken aback but most appreciative of how many of you enjoyed along with what I hope to be the final chapter in the great Serial Oil Pressure Killer series here on Möbius.World.

This last week most of my time has been spent putting Humpty Dumpty aka Mr. Gee all back together again with his new crankshaft, bearings and now FLAT oil pipework fittings installed and you can read all about that below.  He is now back to ‘’bed” resting on his anti vibration mounts and I’m working my way through the rest of the assembly and adjustments so I can bring him back to life purring away in his Engine Room.  If all goes well I should be able to share the first start up in next week’s update so do stay tuned for that.

Picking Up Where We Left Off

In my focus on telling the long and winding tale about tracking down the real oil pressure killer I skipped over most of the process of reinstalling the new crankshaft, oil pump, oil cooler tube and all the many other parts that I had disassembled so I will catch you up with al that now.

One of the only things we are not so fond of about our years here in Turkey is how much time, money and energy it takes to get things shipped into or out of the country.  Not completely sure why this is and we do sometimes have things all go very well, but most often it is quite a PITA.  Such was the case with getting the previous crankshaft sent back to Gardner Marine in England to be reground and then getting the new crank, oil pump, cooler tube and O-rings sent back to us here in Finike marina. 
PXL_20220111_080324835

With the help of our ever resourceful “Turkish Fixer” Alaaddin, the latest crate finally arrived about two weeks ago.
PXL_20220111_081110154.MPThe crankshaft alone weighs about 100kg/220lbs but Christine and I were able to get it out of the van and down the ramp onto the swim platform on Möbius without it going overboard.
PXL_20220111_082111680and then slowly get him down the steps into the Workshop.
PXL_20220111_082610700There are a number of parts that attach to the front end of the crankshaft such as a large disk vibration damper, triple row timing chain cog, roller bearings, etc. and these all need to be pressed or bolted onto the crankshaft.  So I propped it up against the center workbench to do all this work.
PXL_20220111_082909767This tag confirms the sizes of the Main Bearing and Connecting Rod or “Big End” bearing journals after they have been freshly reground and then the bearings are oversized by this same amount to match.

Protective corrugated cardboard is wrapped around each journal to protect the finely ground surfaces during shipping and installation.
PXL_20220115_143945288To prevent the crankshaft from moving fore and aft there are two pairs of Thrust Bearings that need to allow no more than 0.006 – 0.009” of end play so you need to fit these to a newly ground crankshaft to get the exact fit.  My good ole drill press often doubles as a vertical milling machine so I was able to use it again here to mill down each Thrust Bearing to just the right thickness.
PXL_20210912_082031223I could do a dry fit of this and check the gap with feeler gauges while the crank was out of the engine and then once it was in place I could double check with a dial gauge as you see here.  I forcefully tap the crank fully forward to zero the gauge and then fully aft to read the total endwise travel.  Reading was about 0.0065” or “six and a half thou” which is just right.
PXL_20220117_112447003Once I had the damper, roller bearings and chainwheel cog fully mounted I could start to carefully pull the whole assembly into the Engine Room.
PXL_20220117_112715308A bit like an inch worm’s progress, I just took it a step at a time.  It was probably now approaching 140kg/300lbs but I could lift one end by hand and so I put in some plywood ramps to help me slide the crank slide into the ER ………
PXL_20220117_113105187…… then inch it over under the anxiously awaiting Mr. Gee who was “hanging in there”.
PXL_20220117_114830108I rigged up a set of 6:1 blocks at the front and rear of the engine using Dyneema that I could wrap around the ends of the crankshaft and allow me to gradually pull it up into place.
PXL_20220117_123704553To make sure the large hardened steel studs that clamp the main bearings in place don’t touch and damage the ground surfaces, I wrapped the threads with lots of duct tape and then carefully peeled off the corrugated cardboard covers.
PXL_20220117_091641718Over on the workbench, I cleaned and prepped the main bearing shells in their big cast AL bearing caps.
PXL_20220118_153449942Each of the AL bearing caps are press fit into the solid AL crankcase so I used a hydraulic jack to push them into place and then the cast iron Bridges slide over the two studs and the nuts are torqued down.

FYI, the small oval surface you see machined on each Bridge is where the infamously “bowed” fittings with the O-rings bolt in place.
PXL_20220118_153500367Once I had the crankshaft bolted in place I could very carefully lower each Connecting Rod down onto their journals and bolt their bearing caps in place with the four bolts on each one.


Torqueing all these nuts down has to be done in a specific pattern as you progress through four different stages of increasing torque so that they are fully tightened and clamp the crank bearings precisely round.
PXL_20220121_154843715Crankshaft is now fully in place with all cylinders attached and turning easily so I now turned my attention to installing the very critical timing chain and the hand crank chainwheel and water pump/alternator cogged belt pulleys on the front end.
PXL_20220122_132948823Small and Light are never found in the same sentence with Gardner so I used the same inch work technique to get the massive solid cast AL oil pan/sump moved into the ER and in place under Mr. Gee.

PXL_20220122_151821143I was able to reuse the 6:1 blocks and some webbing at the front and rear of the sump to pull it up into place and get it all aligned to slide onto the oil pump tube and the studs that attach the sump to the crankcase.


PXL_20220124_105220238The flywheel is the most massive of all, not sure of its exact weight but I can tell you that it takes four burly guys to pick it up and it is all I can do to tip it upright when it is on the ground  Fortunately the 6:1 blocks help me work smarter not harder and so once I got Mr. Gee pulled into the right position I was able to easily lift this beast up and into precise position to slide over the 6 end studs on the crankshaft.
PXL_20220124_132135883With the flywheel torqued down I could now mount the aft half of its housing and then bolt on the large mounting brackets I had designed for the anti vibration “feet” or mounts to attach to on either side.
PXL_20220125_135708263After carefully repositioning the overhead steel beams spanning the ER hatch up above, I was able to now lower Mr. Gee’s feet onto the Engine Beds for what he and I both fervently hope is the LAST time for a LONG time!
CentaMax coupling photoAnd now the wrestling match begins as I coax all of Mr. Gee aft to engage the big rubber cogs on the CentaMax torsion coupling on the Nogva input shaft to the matching AL housing on the Flywheel. 
PXL_20220127_094910030

The blocks help me take off some of the weight and then lots of elbow grease and pry bars allow me to slide Mr. Gee aft little by little.  Here I now have it all lined up with the cogs just engaged.  You can see the 3cm gap that I still have to slide Mr. Gee aft to fit tight against the Brown Nogva case.
PXL_20220130_110112852Done!  Mr. Gee and Miss Nogva are now bolted back together and remarried for their new life together.
PXL_20220127_150433102Next up is this new bit of engineering art and science from Gardner that was in the crate with the crankshaft.  This is the copper engine oil cooler pipe where the oil is pumped through on its own circuit with its own oil pump.  The  “dimpled” pipe creates more surface area for the cooling sea water to flow around and extract out the heat from the oil as it flows through the tube.
PXL_20220127_150450223Too bad this copper beauty has to be hidden away when I slide it into this cast Bronze housing but I’ve done my best to polish up the housing and give it a clear epoxy coating to keep it looking great for years to come.  Who says you can’t have a bit of “bling” on a Gardner?!
PXL_20220129_114514899Here is the engine oil cooler all reassembled.  The cast Bronze housing on the closest end is where the oil enters and then runs through that dimpled tube inside and comes out the far end where it then drains back into the pan all nice and cool. 

Sea water is pumped into the flanged fitting you see lying open in the near end here and then it flows inside the square cast Bronze housing and out the large diameter copper pipe elbow you can see on the far end.
PXL_20220129_114519330Looking into that hole in the flange you see above, you can see the copper dimpled tube inside.
PXL_20220130_110125103Sorry for the poor photo but if you look closely you can see the Bronze oil cooler now installed along the side of Mr. Gee on the left side of this photo. 

I then connected all the white water hoses you see on the Right side here to various parts of Mr. Gee.  Some of these carry fresh water to the heat exchanger which is like the radiator in a car or truck but uses sea water to cool rather than air.  Other hoses cary salt water in/out of the engine oil cooler and the heat exchangers and the water pump.  You can see through the clear lid on one of the sea water strainer in the mid Right side.
PXL_20220130_110145440Big Black 5” Exhaust hose now reconnected to the large White water separator/silencer in the top Left corner and then down and out the ER where it connects to the AL exhaust pipe welded into the hull above the WL.
And that’s where we are at as of now (Jan 30th 2022) and where I will pick up with you again next week.  Lots more parts and systems to reconnect and install but if all goes well I hope to be able to bring you a short video of Mr. Gee starting up first crank as he usually does and let you all hear the sweet sounds of a Gardner 6LXB purring away.

Thanks for joining and for your comments and questions typed into the “join the Discussion” box below.

-Wayne