On the Run Möbius Update 19 Dec. 2022

Not much change since my last sitrep on our stay here in Tanja Marina Bay in Tangier as we continue waiting for a break in the weather to start our passage South to the Canary Islands. 

However in her most recent Sailingwriter newsletter, Christine has put together a great summary of our travels all the way across the Mediterranean from Kalymnos Island in Greece to here in Tangier so I will let her do a much better job than I ever can of taking you through all the spots we visited along the way with her photos and prose. 


Screenshot Sailingwriter On the RunChristine has really been enjoying publishing her “Sailingwriter” newsletter on Substack so just click on THIS link to read her most recent newsletter “On the Run”. 

* If you would like to automatically receive updates each time Christine publishes a new newsletter on Substack, just click the “Subscribe” button in the top right of the Sailingwriter page.
Tangier to Lanzarote route mapIf the current weather forecast holds we hope to leave Tanja Marina Bay on Wednesday morning the 21st December, to make our way south to the Canary Islands.  This passage will be about 600 nautical smiles (1100km/690 miles) which will likely take us about 3 full days and have us arriving on Christmas eve. 
Depending on weather and timing, we will likely make the most northerly island of Lanzarote our first stop to officially check into this Spanish group of islands. 
Christmas in the Canary Islands has a nice ring to it don’t you think?

detailed-map-of-canary-islandsThere are seven main islands in the Canary archipelago and we hope to visit as many of them as we can while we move West through the Canaries and keep a keen eye on the weather forecasts for the best departure date to begin our two week crossing over to the Caribbean.  We will update you all here when we are in the Canaries before we start our Atlantic crossing so stay tuned for that.

From all of the crew of the Good Ship Möbius our sincere and heartfelt thanks to each and every one of you for joining us throughout this past year.  Knowing that you are there and all your comments and questions are a big part of what makes this whole experience so special and rewarding for us and we are truly grateful. 

Wherever you are and however you choose to celebrate the upcoming holidays, we wish you great joy and happiness as 2022 ends and we all set our sights on making 2023 the best year yet.

Wayne, Christine, Barney & Ruby

Timing in Tangier Möbius Update Nov 28-Dec 11, 2022

Not too much to report from my side of the past two weeks as we continue to wait for a weather window to open up and let us make the passage south along the West cost of Morocco to one of the Canary Islands from where we will start to cross the Atlantic.  Lots of daily boat projects configuring some of our Maretron monitoring system, dialing in Furuno Radar, adding insulation to fridge/freezers, etc. but nothing too photogenic to show.

However, Captain Christine has been using our extended time in this fascinating city of Tangier to get out and explore so I will mostly share some of her great photos.

PXL_20221127_115032836Picking up where I left off in the last Mobius Update we were exploring “The Rock” aka Gibraltar as the great sunny weather we’ve been having for months for both shoreside explorations and passages continued. 
PXL_20221128_101041284.MPTaking advantage of the good weather, we waved goodbye to Gibraltar as we put it in our wake on Monday the 28th and made our way back across the Straits of Gibraltar heading SW over to Africa and officially out of the Mediterranean and into the Atlantic.
Strait_of_Gibraltar_from_Sentinel-3A_pillarsAs this satellite shot from space shows the Strait is VERY narrow and the only place where all the water of the Mediterranean flows in.
Strait of Gibraltar bathymetricNot surprisingly then this tremendous volume of water flowing for so many years has also made this Strait VERY deep, which makes for some pretty significant and wild currents.
PXL_20221125_043212737Oh, and of course this narrow passage is also the only passage for all ships going In/Out of the western end of the Med so it its a bit busy as well. Each blue triangle on our chart screen is a commercial ship.
PXL_20221128_120314906It was another sunny day with winds below 20 knots most of the passage and you can see the seas starting to churn a bit as we headed West to get over to good spot to turn South and get across the shipping lanes as quickly as possible.
Gibraltar to Tangier crossing mapYou can see this pretty clearly in this screen shot of our actual track coming out of Gibraltar and heading over to Tangier.  With such varied currents and sea conditions our speeds ranged from as slow as 4kts up to 13 and Möbius handled it all eXtremely well and we made the 37nm passage in 5 hours for an average speed of 7.4kts.
Tangier Marina Bay marinaWe entered this lovely Tanja Marina Bay in Tangier where we went through a very smooth checking in procedure before moving over to our spot on N dock which is in the top right end of the photo here.  The marina can hold up to 1400 boats and is relatively new having opened in 2018.
IMG_2119We had heard from other cruisers that the marina was very full due to the poor weather off the coast preventing all the boats trying to get down to the Canary Islands but we were treated to this excellent spot with an empty slot on the Starboard/Right side and nothing on the other.  A good spot for a few days, or so we thought at the time.
weather map Dec 11Mother Nature apparently had different plans in mind for us and our weather maps since just after we arrived have looked like this one, which is from today, Dec. 11th.  We’re looking for Blues 0-10 kts and Greens 10-20 kts but as you can see it is mostly all Yellows and Reds which are winds up to 50+ kts.  These are being caused by a series of Low pressure spots that keep marching East across the Atlantic one after another for the past few weeks with no end in sight yet.
wind color scale from WindyThis legend will give you the details of wind speeds and colours if you’re interested.
Fortunately we live on The No Plan Plan and so the only date we have for making the Trans Atlantic crossing over to the Caribbean is whenever Mother Nature gifts us with a nice Blue slot across.  And so we wait until we see something more like …..
Blue Slot crossing

…. this!  I’ve marked up this forecast weather map for next Saturday 17th December (click to enlarge) to help visualize the difference and what we’re waiting for.  The challenge is that the passage down to the Canary Islands will take about 3 days and then the crossing to the Caribbean will take about 12-16 days so we are waiting until the forecast calls for the typical “Blue slot” or Green with winds behind us, across the Atlantic like the one you can see here, and one that will hold for 2-3 weeks. 
Atlantic sailing routes mapHistorically those are the conditions here from about the end of November through February and hence the time when sailors come to the Canary Islands to cross the Atlantic.  But as we are all experiencing no matter where we are, weather patterns are changing and often not following patterns from previous years and so this year we are getting this parade of Lows coming across and so the marina here in Tangier is chock full of boats all waiting like us for the weather window to open up to let us get down to the Canaries or Cape Verde to the south, and then make the Atlantic crossing with good winds and seas. 
Being a power boat we have the significant advantage of being able to go in anything from Blue to Green whereas sailboats want Green winds of up to 20 knots from the side to behind so we will likely be able to leave before many of the other boats here.  But not for at least another week or two by the looks of the current forecasts.
IMG_2161On the flip side, the local weather here in Tangier all last week was beautiful and this is an eXtremely fascinating city with a very long and diverse history so a pretty good spot to be for a few weeks or however long it takes. 
Tangier-circa-1670-1920x1080Being such a strategic location Tangier has been very highly fortified since about the tenth century BC, and all the ensuing occupations since by Romans, Berbers, Greece, England, France, Spain, Portugal, and more. 
IMG_2144Today fortifications like the one in the photo above have been restored and updated such as we saw here.
IMG_2163We spent an hour or so wandering through this sprawling fort with views like this which make it easy to see just how advantageous this location was for defending the Straits.
IMG_2167As we moved further in the historic preservation areas soon transformed into scenes like this with shops of every description on street level and apartments above.
29CEB5AA-A2F5-4B04-BB23-DC4A19B27E2EDiverse does not begin to capture the tremendous variety of everything from architecture and colours to …..
IMG_2172….  butchers ….
IMG_2141…. fish …
1101BB8A-5EE9-4FEA-B951-03672ADFA333… spices ….
IMG_2182… pastries …
4D98BFC1-637D-4186-B5B7-6A43E65FD98E…. and dress. 

I enjoy just taking it all in and observing details of the buildings, the people and the businesses.
IMG_2187Christine is the researcher and she found out that this was where many scenes in the Jason Bourne Ultimatum movie were shot including the Gran Café de Paris scene.
IMG_2189Where she walked there last week for her afternoon coffee.
IMG_2183and to this patisserie with her “Freedom machine” parked out front.
Meanwhile, back at Tanga Marina Bay ……..
IMG_2169We aren’t the only eXpedition type of boat here when this little fellow showed up about a week ago.  Christine met up with the crew on one of her walks and they were very familiar with our boat and some of the similar ones built in by Circa Marine in New Zealand.  I think their “tender” on the back is bigger than Möbius!
Morocco's players pose for a group picture ahead of the second leg of the 2022 Qatar World Cup African Qualifiers football match between Morocco and DR Congo at the Mohamed V Stadium in the city of Casablanca on March 29, 2022. (Photo by AFP) (Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images)The weather may have turned cold and wet this past week but what was really hot was all the celebrations of the Moroccan national football team competing in the FIFA 2022 World Cup in Qatar.  We are docked beside a long row of cafés and restaurants and the Moroccan fans have been bringing down the house every night their team plays.
Morocco FIFA 2022 team chargeThis is closer to what it looks like inside these spots.  We aren’t much into sports but the story of the Moroccan team is quite incredible being the first team ever from Africa to compete in the World Cup and as of last night’s win over Portugal, who were favored to win the whole tournament apparently, the Moroccan fans have been partying hard and loud ever since.  An amazing story and they play top rated France next so I’m sure that the feverish support will reach all new highs on Wednesday. 
Great timing for us to be in this mix and Go Morocco GO!


So there’s your update from the Good Ship Möbius and I will update again once the weather window arrives and you can join us in the trip South to the Canary Islands.  Till then, thanks for all your comments and questions, please keep them coming and we’ll do our best to keep you entertained and informed.

-Wayne

Westward Ho! Möbius Update 16 Nov. 2022

It has been a very busy 17 days since I left off on the last update “Bye Bye Kalymnos”  on the eve of us leaving Kalymnos Island in Greece and finally starting our travels westward across and out of the Mediterranean as we set up for crossing the Atlantic probably next month. 

PXL_20221030_104248946It was with the full spectrum of emotions that we put Kalymnos in our wake as we left on Oct. 30th after first arriving back on July 7th.  This little island had been our home base all that time and we had definitely felt part of the community.  However we were also eXtremely happy to finally be heading back out to sea and back the life we love of exploring the world on our latest floating home, Möbius.
Arial view Melilla from N. coastFast forwarding to today, Wednesday Nov 16th, 2022, I am writing this update after we just pulled into a lovely little marina in the town of Melilla which is about 200 nautical smiles West of the Algeria/Morocco border.  Interestingly enough we are actually not in Morocco as Melilla is as you can read in the link above “.. is an autonomous city of Spain located in north Africa.”  So officially, we are in Spain!
Melilla arial viewAt only 12.3 km2 / 4.7 sq mi Melilla is not very large but has a population of 86 thousand and a very rich history that will be fun to explore in the next few days.

ceuta-and-melilla-spainHopefully you not as “geographically challenged” as I am and will have figured out that we have now travelled the majority of the Mediterranean from the far Eastern end  in Antalya Turkey and are now only 200nm away from Gibraltar that marks the far Western end of the Med. 
Mobius track across the MedI’ve put in an orange line on this map tracing our approximate path of this trip so far.That will give you some idea of how pleased we are to have made such progress and how well Mr. Gee v2.0 has been propelling us along. 

Quick Statistics Overview:

PXL_20221026_071536058.MPSince leaving Kalymnos 17 days ago, we have put about 1600 nautical smiles under our keel and the all new Mr. Gee has now accumulated 194 hours purring away in his Engine Room.  We are still breaking the new engine in so I’ve been keeping the loads at about 75% of the 100% continuous duty rating, which would be 150 BHP @ 1650 RPM that I currently have the fuel injection set up for.  I am able to very accurately gauge and control the engine loads by varying the pitch with the Nogva CPP Controllable Pitch Propeller and then watching the EGT or Exhaust Gas Temperature gauge which is pretty much a direct proxy for engine load.  Full load would typically generate an EGT of about 450C/840F and I’ve been keeping it below 330C/626F and running about 1440 RPM. 
At these settings our Speed Over Ground SOG runs between 7-9 knots depending on wind, sea and current conditions and overall we are averaging a bit more than 8.2 knots at these conservative loads.  Over the coming weeks and months I will start to vary the engine loads with different RPM and pitch settings and record all this data to help me find the Goldilocks combination of SOG and fuel burn.  For those interested, in the 1600 NM so far Mr. Gee has been consuming about 1.78 Liters/NM which would be about 0.47 US Gallons per NM for my Imperial measurement friends and followers.  Our design goal had been to get about 2L/NM doing 200NM per 24 hour day which would equate to averaging about 8.3 knots SOG.  So we are very pleased to have exceeded this already very ambitious design goal and we will see how this changes as Mr. Gee breaks in and we vary SOG and engine loads and encounter more varied sea and weather conditions.  I will do my best to keep you posted as this data accumulates.


We have also been varying the length of each passage as we hop our way West across the Mediterranean with passages like the one today from Saidia Morocco to Melilla Spain being just 35NM in a bit more than 4 hours and our longest passage so far was our jump across the top of Algeria which was 625NM in just over 3 days (79 hrs)

But I’m getting ahead of myself so let’s jump back to where we left off back on Oct. 30th when we finally were able to motor out of the lovely little Greek Island of Kalymnos which had been our home base for almost four months. 


Route Review:

Ios Island S anchorageFor our very first trip with the all new Mr. Gee, after completing all the paperwork needed for us to leave Kalymnos and Greece we motored over to a lovely little anchorage on the South end of the tiny Greek island of Ios which was about 83NM away.  We anchored in to the beautiful little “Never Bay” on the far Left in this photo at 23:00 under an almost full moon and it felt SO good to be on anchor and back at sea again after so many months.
ElefonisosNext day, we got an early start and pulled up the anchor just after sunrise and made our way west to another lovely night anchorage on the South end of little Elafonisos Island which was about 120NM west.  We averaged a bit more than 8.5 knots taking 14 hours and had the anchor down just before 22:00 for another peaceful nights sleep on the hook, aka at anchor.

Elafonisos to Marina RagusaElafonisos was our last anchorage in Greece as we continued our way West and crossed into Italian waters on our way over to Sicily.  Total length of this leg was 415NM which we did in just under 49 hours so average speed was about 8.45 knots.  It was a great two day passage.

PXL_20221102_155134608Captain Christine has acquired the new title of “Weather Wonder Woman” or W3 as she hones her skills using various weather software, most notably PredictWind, to do what I’m calling “No Wind Hunting” as ideal conditions for us have changed dramatically from our decades of sailing and we now ideally want no wind and flat seas or perhaps even better, following seas and winds which give us an added boost in speed.
PXL_20221102_230206660.MPAs you can see from the sunset photo above and this moon setting shot the next night, W3 has become the master No Wind Hunter!

porto_turistico_marina_di_ragusa00We headed for Marina di Ragusa which is about 40NM North West from the SE bottom corner of Sicily.  Our friends Matt and Cindy were there on their new Amel 50 “Speed of Life” and it was great to be able to catch up with them over several meals and good wine while we waited for the next good weather window for the next leg of this adventure to leave the EU and head over to Africa.
Ragusa to LicataWhen entering or leaving a country by boat, you need to do so at an official Port of Entry so we made the short 40nm trip up the cost from Ragusa to Licata which was the closest Port of Entry on our way West. 
marina-di-cala-del-sole-porto5We left Marina di Ragusa as the sun was rising and were docked in Marina di Cala del Sole at Licata just before noon and were able to get a taxi to the Police station where the immigration and Port authorities were located.  This all worked out eXtremely well with neither the marina nor the checking out process taking any time at all or having any fees!  So we were back on Möbius and leaving the dock in just over two hours. 
After the days and weeks and non stop fees trying to get our Schengen visa time extended in Greece you can imagine how delighted we were to have this final exit out of EU and the Schengen Area all happen so quick and easy.  Africa, here we come!

Licata to BizerteAs you can see, it is not a very big jump, about 195NM from Licata in Sicily to Bizerte up on the NE corner of Africa so an easy overnight sail in just less than 30 hours.
PXL_20221108_131024345.MP We pulled in and were side tied for a nice change in the very nice Bezerte Marina by 14:00 on Tuesday the 8th of November.
PXL_20221109_121541790.MPTunisia has very good prices on diesel fuel, 0.66 USD per Liter, so we took full advantage and did our first filling of all six of our diesel tanks.  We took on a total of 6792 liters and with exchange rates for the Tunisian Dinar and a credit card fee the total came to $4510.18 USD which at today’s fuel prices was a very good deal we think.
PXL_20221109_144913587We now had about 11,000 liters of fuel onboard and so we were finally able to see how well Möbius sits on her waterlines.  As you can see, the hull was now eXactly on the lines!
PXL_20221109_144840773.MPA bit closer shot as it is difficult to see where the 120mm wide Black Bootstripe on top changes to the Black InterSleek bottom paint but if you click to enlarge you will see that indeed sits eXactly on that line which is a great testament to our eXcellent NA Dennis Harjamaa!  Well done Dennis and thanks for creating such a fabulous hull and boat for us.

IMG_1938Oh, and just in case you needed any proof that we are definitely not in “Kansas” anymore, check out this shot Christine took of the breakwater across from where we were tied up in Bizerte Marina.  Yup, that’s a camel, well actually a dromedary with just the one hump, casually strolling along the breakwater.  There was a small herd of them which we saw at various times during the day.
IMG_1949While we were only in Bezerte for a few days before the next weather window opened up we did get time to walk into the the very colourful old town and enjoy the sights and smells of this waterfront city.
IMG_1950We were also able to fit in a great date night eating some street food and then a delicious full meal at a little restaurant on the water.
IMG_1945And enjoy one more beautiful sunset evening to finish up our all too short time in Bezerte and Tunisia.
Bezerte to Saidia mapWe had originally hoped to fuel up in neighboring Algeria where the fuel prices are even lower at about 22 cents per liter, but it turned out to be too long and difficult to get the required visa to allow us to stop there so we had to make the jump from Bezerte to Saidia in Morocco in one go and sail about 10nm off the very long Algerian coast of North Africa. 
PXL_20221111_164425647.MPIt was a very smooth passage as W3 worked her weather routing skills perfect yet again and we had exceptionally calm seas with some following seas to help out several times.
IMG_1960On one of her 6 hour watches Christine snapped this photo as she had fun surfing Möbius down some of the larger following swells and hitting speeds above 11 knots.
PXL_20221112_164344928Most of the time though it was more like this and we enjoyed some beautiful sunsets and sunrises along the passage.
PXL_20221113_155248433.MPChristine had several opportunities on this passage to enjoy watching the large dolphins that came over to say Hi and play in the pressurized area ahead of our bow.  I’m not sure who was having more fun, Christine or the dolphins but they all had a great time.
PXL_20221112_164731155This is a relatively busy shipping route and so we saw our share of other ships on this passage such as this little fella.
PXL_20221101_153954050We have a very good Class A AIS (Automatic Identification System) onboard, with several backups so pretty much all the other ships show up on our charts along the way and give us full information on each one including boat size, heading, speed, CPA Closest Point of Approach), etc. so makes it very easy to contact them on the rare times we need to and otherwise stay well informed of where they are in relation to us.
PXL_20221111_081856972.MPI took advantage of the calm conditions to do the first test run of the Paravanes I had built.  These are what we are going to try out for stabilizing Möbius in seas that want to cause us to roll back and forth sideways.
PXL_20221111_082923449.MPThe paravanes or “fish” as they are often called, are rigged to a fixed line of Dyneema off the end of each A-frame boom which is lowered off each side at about 45 degrees.  The fish run about 5 meters or 18 feet below the surface where they “fly” through the water very smoothly.  When the boat tries to roll to one side the paravane that is being pulled up resists this motion and the one on the opposite side dives down as its line goes slack and sets up for its turn when the boat tries to roll the other way.
PXL_20221111_081832056.MPI particularly like iterative design and I start with the simplest approach and then adjust from there as I test.  This first setup was a fully manual one with the orange line being the fixed length line that the paravane is suspended from and then a smaller Grey retrieval line attached to the rear of the tail fin.  Christine slowed the boat and I lowered each fish into the water and they quickly zipped out and trailed behind the boom attachment points and then bring the boat back up to speed.  A bit too busy to take photos but you can imagine how this works.
PXL_20221111_082918031It worked quite well but the retrieval required more effort than I thought was safe so I will re rig these lines so that the retrieval line goes up through a block mid way out on the boom and then over and down to a winch on the large Arch on the boat.  I’m in the process of doing this rigging now and we will try it out on the next passage and let you know how it works and can get some better photos and details on their performance.
PXL_20221116_082101592We pulled into Saidia Marina which is just inside the border between Algeria and Morocco our longest passage so far at 625nm which took us just under 79 hours with an overall average SOG of 7.9 knots.  As you can see, they had plenty of room for us!
Saidia Marina TunisiaThe marina is very large with an entire mall of shops and restaurants surrounding two sides but it has seen better days and Morocco had been closed for two years due to Covid restrictions so it was a bit sad.  However the people and all the officials were extremely kind and engaging and we were quickly checked in and had fresh Moroccan stamps in our passports. 
Saidia to Melilla marina mapWe were about to loose the good weather we’d been having so we took advantage and made the quick 35nm trip from Saidia over to Melilla which as I mentioned at the beginning is actually part of Spain so we pulled in just after noon time and were quickly tied up and checked in.

As per my opening photos and comments, this marina and town is the opposite of what we found in Saidia, being very full and busy, very modern and diverse and is already proving to be a great spot for us to hunker down for perhaps as much as a week while we wait for the winter storms to pass through and provide us with the next chance to motor our way along the Moroccan coast as we get closer and closer to the Straits of Gibraltar that are now less than 150 nm WNW of us. 


Prime Meridian Ease West hemisphere diagramThe other fun thing that recently happened is that we crossed the invisible Prime Meridian or Zero degree Longitude and so we are now into officially in the Western Hemisphere!  Antalya sits on about 30.7 degrees East and Melilla is at about 3 degrees West so we have now traveled more than 33 degrees of latitude on Möbius.
Atlantic sailing routes mapLooking further ahead, we are setting up to cross the Atlantic next month and will mostly likely take something close to the Southern route as shown on this map.  These are typical routes for sailboats and thus based on favorable winds circling the Azores High pressure zone so we will just wait and see how that is positioned this year and figure out the best “No Wind Hunting” route for us to take across the Atlantic.  Stay tuned for more as these Nauti Nomadic Grandparents do our best to continue to keep you all well entertained!
Thanks and hope you will join us again for the next update to see just where Möbius is in a week or two.

-Wayne

Just When We Thought We Were Out; …… Möbius Update 13-19, 2022a

Reminiscent of the line from one of the Godfather movies I believe “Just when I thought I was out; they pull me back in” Möbius is now back in Finike.  Multiple factors driving our decision including that Christine needed to go back to Antalya for one or more consultations with her surgeon who did the arthroscopic operation to fix her torn meniscus and we needed to get the new beam for the Davit Arch brought to Möbius from Naval Yachts in Antalya.  As you may recall, Setur Marina here in Finike was our “home port” since last July so we are very familiar with the area and know where to go to get things, who to talk with in our network here to get things done and a good safe spot to have Möbius tied up for a few more weeks while Christine continues her recovery and I get boat jobs done.

Marmaris to Finike

PXL_20220613_140841216.MPI spent most of the day on Monday going to different marine stores in Marmaris to pick up some of the lines and hardware I need for rigging up our Paravane stabilization system and doing some grocery shopping to stock up for the next week.  Christine had found a lovely little anchorage on the charts that was just about 10 nm (nautical miles) from the marina in Marmaris so we untied from the dock and headed over there on Monday afternoon leaving Marmaris in our wake as per the photo. 
Though I must point out “What wake?” as I am just so pleased with how clean Möbius slices through the water.  Thanks Dennis for the great hull design!
PXL_20220613_162930803.MPWe tucked inside a small bay with this small island just outside and enjoyed the sundown with some wine up in the SkyBridge with views like this.
PXL_20220614_010131475.NIGHTWe had a bit of a rude awakening when a ferry went past the entrance at about 3am which rolled us so bad we almost flew out of bed.  After picking up some of the items that had ended up on the floor we decided that we were wide awake and had a long run ahead of us so might as well just weigh anchor and head for Finike.  We were rewarded with what was apparently a special “Rose Moon” and very flat seas as you can see so made the decision pretty easy.
PXL_20220614_040449546It was ideal motor boat conditions with glassy flat seas and no wind.

This is a shot of our wake or lack thereof at about 8.3 knots
PXL_20220614_041557378And this is the bow wave.

It was about 110nm down to Finike and these conditions continued the entire way.  It was the longest continuous voyage we’ve yet taken aboard Möbius and gave us a good chance to test out running the boat for longer and longer runs as we get everything broken in and learn more and more about running this very unique and new to us boat.


I’ve discovered that our fuel flow meters have not been connected correctly so all my previous fuel burn numbers I’ve published are out by at least 40% so for this run I measured the actual volume of fuel removed from the Day Tank and used this to calculate the true fuel consumption.  109nm total distance traveled and we burned 169 liters so an average of 0.64 nm/L or 2.4 USG/nm which is right on my original estimates and MUCH better than the numbers I had been getting from the fuel flow meters.  Just like the oil pressure gauge problems that vexed me in the past, I have once again been tripped up by assuming that the gauges were correct.  Silly me!


PXL_20220614_084653028The Turquoise Coast of Turkey was on full display for the whole day and this photo is typical of what the rugged rocky and forested coastline looks like.

Total trip time anchor to dock was about 13.5 hours so our average speed was 8.1 knots.  We will continue to play with the various combinations of Mr. Gee’s RPM and the CPP pitch settings to bring the speed up more and more and find the Goldilocks “sweet spot” for speed, fuel economy and ideal loads.


Progress Update on Christine and XPM Hulls #2 & 3

We rented a car for Tuesday morning and drove down to the hospital in Antalya for Christine’s checkup and to get the stitches removed.  Typical of our experiences with Turkish medical treatment at least at this hospital, it took less than 20 minutes from the time Christine walked in with no appointment to when she was back out front of the hospital stitches removed and an A+ report card from her surgeon.  She is still not getting off the boat too much yet but the swelling is way down as is the pain and she is able to walk more and more around the boat so a full recovery is looking more and more likely.  Doc said she could go swimming as of today (Sunday) so we will probably go for our first swim of the year when I get this blog posted.
PXL_20220615_122703063While we were in Antalya, we asked Naval Yachts if we could stop by the Free Zone to see how the two new XPM builds are going and this is what XPM78-02 “Vanguard” is looking like.
PXL_20220615_122810000And this is what XPM85-01 is looking like while still upside down getting all the hull plates welded on.  She is due to flip right side up next month which is always a very big milestone in a build and we could not be more excited for her owners Andrew and Lili.
PXL_20220615_122816018A view of Vanguard from the rear Port quarter.  Those with detailed eyes will perhaps notice that the owners have decided to paint the hull so you can see the first coat of primer has been applied to the hull sides.
PXL_20220615_123345893One of the major differences between our XPM78-01 and this second version is that it will be a twin engine/prop boat.  These are the partially completed skegs that house the prop shafts.
PXL_20220615_123439385.MPNo change here on the Swim Platform with the doghouse for entering into the Engine Room and the same stairs on boat sides leading up to the Aft Deck.
PXL_20220615_123452450With twin JD engines the Engine Room will be much more traditional with a full beam layout but this comes at the expense of the Workshop we have in Möbius with the smaller central ER for Mr. Gee.  The Basement has also been eliminated on Vanguard so the ER will also have most of the systems equipment located within as well.
PXL_20220615_123825454Up above on the Aft Deck the cantilevered roof is much longer and more substantial than on Möbius which will provide more shelter underneath and space for solar panels above.
PXL_20220615_123916736.MPThese are the drawings and renderings for one of the two guest cabins, this one located at the very front near the forepeak.
PXL_20220615_124054850Construction of the furniture for this cabin has begun and this will be the cabin for the Owners’ young son.
PXL_20220615_124102153Shower and toilet in the cabin’s Head.
PXL_20220615_124227048Probably the biggest single difference between Möbius and Vanguard is that they have replaced the Basement underneath the floor of the Salon with this spacious Master Cabin.  To get the additional 1.2m of  headroom needed, the tank tops have been lowered and the whole Salon has been raised.  Provides a significant increase in the sleeping area but comes at the expense of storage so all part of the compromises of designing and building a boat that best matches her owners.
PXL_20220615_124929172.MPThe additional height is easy to see when you notice how the bottom of the Salon windows now sit about 40cm above the deck where they are almost flush on Möbius.
PXL_20220615_124937198Another very visible difference with the addition of these tall bulwarks that run down the entire length of both sides of the deck.  Will make for a much safer feeling that many prefer when traversing these side decks.
PXL_20220615_125017670Seen from the Aft Deck of Vanguard, the stern of XPM85-01 shows how it too will be a twin engine boat and the two prop tunnels are easy to see now.
PXL_20220615_125045587A worm’s eye view underneath the XPM85 shows how the upside down framing is supported by the steel structure attached to the concrete floor of the shipyard.
PXL_20220615_125055189Still a long way to go and a LOT of welding but they are off to a good start as you can see looking up into what will be the Engine Room of the XPM85.
PXL_20220615_125333603Looking aft from the bow, the plates for the sides of the hull are being held in alignment by all these sacrificial AL bars.  The plates are pushed/pulled into alignment and then these bars are tack welded to hold the plates in position for the MIG welders to sew together all the seams.
PXL_20220615_125345569Same “crash bulkhead” bow design and central anchor snubber nose cone.
PXL_20220615_125148319As exciting as it was to see all the progress on these next two XPM hulls, what really got our hearts racing was finding this completed new beam for the Davit Arch on Möbius!  We are ever so appreciative of Naval Yachts getting this replacement beam fabricated in record time.  All thanks to Dennis’ even speedier redesign and testing of this new beam so our thanks to all.  I’ve arranged for a bonded truck to bring it from the Free Zone to Finike this coming week and with any luck I’ll be able to show you the new and improved Davit Arch installed and working on Möbius in next week’s update.

Paravane Progress

Paravane rigging System v2We have decided to go with passive rather than active stabilization, at least for the foreseeable future and will use a pair of A-frame booms that can be lowered to about 45 degrees off each side of the Aft Deck.  The aluminium booms have been installed for some time now so this week I was finally able to do the rigging to raise/lower the booms.
PXL_20220618_133023316As with most of the other rigging on Möbius I am using synthetic rope most commonly known as Dyneema or Amsteel.  As incredible as it sounds this new age line is stronger than multi stand stainless steel wire and is SO much easier to rig and replace.  It is easily cut with this “hot knife” and I just wrap the location of the cut with grey PVC tape and then slice through the line with the red hot blade.  This leaves a very nicely fused end on the line so it does not unravel and is easy to handle.
PXL_20220618_124329823.MPThis is the setup that will raise and lower the booms from vertical when stowed to about 45 degrees when deployed. Very simple setup with the end of the line attached to the bracket on the left which is about half way up the 6.2m/20ft long boom pole and then over through the black turning block and down to the winch below.

Deploying the paravane booms is a simple matter of slipping the line on the winch to lower the boom until ……


PXL_20220618_133653299…….. the fixed length support line at the end of the boom goes tight.
PXL_20220618_144447113Looking up from deck level where it is easy to reach and turn the winch handle.
PXL_20220618_133904146Easy to see from this view from the dock.  One side all done.
PXL_20220618_144003986Both sides done and this is what it looks like with both paravane booms fully extended. 
LarryM fish in water with retreival lineI grabbed this shot from some posts on the Trawler Forum boat “Hobo” to show what it will look like with the paravanes or “fish” as they are often called deployed when underway.  Each paravane/fish is suspended by a 9m length of Dyneema from the ends of each boom such that they “fly” through the water about 6m/20ft below the surface and about 5m off the sides of the hull. 
As the boat tries to roll, one vane resists being pulled up while the other one “dives” down and sets up to resist as the roll goes over to the other side.  A bit like the tight rope walker’s pole works.  Paravanes also have the benefit of working at anchor as well so no more being tossed out of bed in a rolly anchorage!
Canadian plywood   lead paravane WoodFish from Balder VIII on Trawler ForumSome of my fellow Canadian boaters have come up with this design for a DIY paravane and I’ll be using this to build the first pair for Möbius. 
PXL_20220619_123240022Plywood is surprisingly difficult to find here so Christine and I spent a few hours when we were in Antalya searching and finally finding a shop in the industrial zone that had some left over 20mm / 3/4” marine plywood left over and kindly agreed to cut the two pieces I need to build our paravanes.
Plywood paravane exampleWhen finished our paravanes will look very similar to these also off mv Hobo. 

White epoxy painted plywood with aluminium plate for the fin and line attachment.  We will use Dyneema rather than SS chain as shown here.

That’s the story for the week of June 13-19 here in Finike and hope your week was similarly productive.  Thanks for taking the time to join us here and please do add any and all comments or questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  Hope to have you here with us again next week.

-Wayne





Rest & Recovery XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Update 6-12 June, 2022

IMG_0936
We have stayed for a second week here in Netsel Marina in Marmaris as this past week was a purposely slow one after Christine’s knee surgery the week before to repair a torn meniscus.  She has been very diligent in following her surgeon’s orders to rest, ice the knee regularly for the first week and slowly start putting more weight on it with short walks around the boat.  Swelling was down and feeling better each day so she took her first trip ashore in almost two weeks on Friday.  We walked a few hundred meters up the concrete docks here in Netsel Marina in Marmaris and enjoyed dinner out at a small café on the docks.  Weather has been ideal with daytime temps just over 30C/86F and cool sleeping temps around 20C/68 at night.


IMG_0934Marina life is not our cup of tea but it was just what the doctor ordered and made the most sense for a full recovery of Christine’s knee.  The marina here in Marmaris is quite large and very full of charter boats of all shapes and sizes.  We spend a lot of our time up in the SkyBridge on Möbius and this is the view off our bow where there is a constant parade of boats going in and out of the marina. 
IMG_0926Makes for great entertainment with little guys like this coming in to either pick up or drop off guests or make a very $$$$ stop at the fuel dock which was where this guy was headed.
Sailing Writer on SubStack screen grabChristine has started a new edition of her Sailing Writer newsletters using SubStack and in the latest one she published earlier this week she wrote about her whole experience of “Living the Dream” as the cruising life is often described.  You can read that HERE and also see the other newsletters she has written and subscribe to get them automatically in the future if you like.

We are also both using this time to ease our way through the transition out of full on boat building mode that we’ve been in for the past four plus years and back into cruising mode so I’ve been tackling at least one boat job a day, researching and designing new bits of kit for the boat and getting back to reading about topics that pique my curiosity such as quantum physics and some of the fascinating new thinking about time.  As one of my all time favorite teachers and mentors Richard Feynman once put it “If you think you understand quantum physics, you don’t understand quantum physics.”  and “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.” , which definitely includes me but I do like trying to understand it a bit a little bit better and find the whole topic just mind bogglingly interesting.

PXL_20220606_131434472One of the more satisfying jobs I got done this past week was finally buttoning up Mr. Gee by bolting on the valve rocker covers that I had polished up to give him just a wee bit more Gardner style “bling”.  I have left them off most of the time up to now as I wanted to keep a close eye on things as I put on more engine hours and one nice feature of these LXB motors is that they don’t spit any oil when the valve covers are off.  Also made it easy for me to do several valve adjustments along the way to make sure those are all just right. 
PXL_20220606_131441545.MPBut with about 40+ hours now and all going well I wanted to seal and bolt these covers on to keep out any foreign matter and to give him a bit more polished and finished look. 

What do you think?
Tomorrow I will head into some of the many marine stores in town to pick up some of the supplies I need for other boat jobs on the list such as oil for the first oil change on Mr. Gee after the last rebuild and some hardware and lines that I need for rigging the paravanes. 

Marmaris Bay sattelite shotThen on Monday afternoon we will head out of the marina which is the blue dot at the top center of this sat photo, and go over to a nice little anchorage for the night just the other side of  island you can see in the bottom left.  Christine needs to go back to the hospital in Antalya so we will cruise back over to our winter port in Finike which should take us about 10 hours and we can get an early morning start off our anchorage.
We know Finike well and it is a short drive to Antalya which makes it easy for us to provision and work on Möbius to finish the boat jobs we want done before we head out for Athens to meet up with our granddaughters and family the first week of July.

I hope all of you have June and the summer off to a good start and thanks so much for taking the time to join us on this adventure.  Please keep the comments coming in the “Join the Discussion” box below and we’ll see you here again next Sunday.

-Wayne