We’re Shafted, and that’s a GOOD Thing! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Jan 25-30, 2021

As Launch Date looms larger and sooner the theme of checking off all the “little Big” jobs on the punch list continues although we still have a few “Big” jobs such as painting the bottom with foul release paint which continued as well this past week so without any further ado let’s jump right in to see all those jobs both little and BIG that Team Möbius looked after this week of January 25-30, 2021.

We’re Shafted!

PXL_20201027_161439955One of the “little Big” jobs that we completed this past week is getting the propeller shaft fully aligned with the output flange on the Nogva Gearbox and hence this week’s title.

In this photo the dark Burgundy is the Aft Output end of the Nogva Gearbox and the bright Red is the flange on the propeller shaft which continues through the Tides Marine shaft seal system and out of the boat through the large AL prop shaft tube which is hidden here by the Blue Tides Marine silicone bellows hose.
Nogva CPP prop   shaft dim dwg from NogvaThis dimensioned drawing of the complete Nogva CPP or controlled Pitch Propeller, shaft, seal and flange will help orient things a bit.


PXL_20201027_161424326Here I have gone below the boat rotate the CPP prop back and forth while pushing it hard forward so that the two flanges meet.  A few months back we had spent quite a bit of time getting this alignment close as we installed the anti-vibration mounts on the Gardner and the Nogva and you read about that HERE, so now it was time for the fine and final adjustment to get these two flanges perfectly aligned.
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualAs you may recall from previous posts the two flanges need to be eXtremely closely aligned both concentrically as per the illustration on the Left and also laterally as shown on the Right.  Maximum deviation we are allowed is up to 0.005mm / 0.002in (human hair is about 0.05mm diameter) and ideally we are going for zero.
PXL_20210129_073442895.MPNeeding such perfection I called on my Perfect Partner, aka Captain Christine to assist and although she is prone to laying down on the job (sorry, couldn’t resist) she was a huge help and made this task go much faster.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPWe check the alignment by inserting a thin feeler gauge, which is the silver strip you see here, that is a tight sliding fit into the space between the faces of these two flanges and see what the gap is at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock.  Any difference in size of the gap at these locations tells us how far it is out either horizontally at 3 & 6 o’clock or vertically at 12 and 6. 
PXL_20210129_084307980Adding to the challenge the prop shaft needs to be supported in its perfectly centered position which my red hydraulic bottle jack is looking after.
PXL_20201028_093808559Mr. Gee, our Gardner 6LXB is solidly bolted up to the Nogva Gearbox so they are essentially an eXtremely solid single unit that is supported by six anti-vibration mounts such as the Silver one you can see on the Stbd. side of the Nogva Gearbox on the far Right in this photo.  You can see the large vertical threaded part of these mounts with the large supporting hex nut on the bottom and smaller locking nut on the top. 
To align the flanges vertically I need to turn the large nuts at the very front of Mr. Gee or these back two on the Nogva, Up/Down to move the Nogva flange until the gap is zero all the way around.


PXL_20201028_093728662The process then is for me to go around the four Front/Rear mounts and turn those big nuts Up/Down while Christine moved the feeler gauges around the circumference of the flanges and called out the differences in the gap to me. 

With Christine laying down in the space behind the Aft end of the ER Enclosure overtop of the Tides Marine seal at the bottom, there wasn’t enough room to take a photo but this previous shot shows what she was doing as she reached in with the feeler gauges to check the gap and call out the differences to me.  Doing this all by myself was very time consuming so now you see what I called in the Big Boss to help out! 

It still took us almost 2 hours but in the end we got the gap down to zero such that both flanges were touching all the way around. 
PXL_20210129_084325319With these two flanges now fully aligned we could insert the 8 hardened Grade 8 bolts through both flanges and torque them down to 120NM and the alignment was done! 

White grease is TefGel 45 to prevent any corrosion and ensure that these nuts are just as easy to undo after many years on the job when we need to remove the prop shaft or the Nogva/Gardner for some reason in the distant future.
Tides Marine SureSeal illustrationMany of these “little Big” jobs are like dominos in that as getting one done lets you do the next.  So with the flanges aligned and mounts all torqued down I could now finish installing the Tides Marine SureSeal system. This is an eXtremely critical bit of kit as this is responsible for keeping the prop shaft cutlass bearing lubricated with a flow of fresh sea water AND keeping that sea water OUT of the boat!
PXL_20210129_124430339Here is what the real deal looks like now fully installed.  The Blue silicone “Articulating hose” in the illustration above, is double clamped onto the Stern or Prop Shaft Tube at the bottom and onto the Black SureSeal housing at the top. 

The way this works is that inside the SureSeal are two stationary rubber lip seals with the 65mm OD Prop Shaft rotating inside them that keeps the water sea water inside the Prop Shaft Tube from being able to get past and into the boat. 

We keep a VERY close eye on that Blue silicone hose over the years as if it were to ever rupture we would have an eXtremely large volume of water flooding into the boat!

FYI,
The Black ring at the top is the very handy holder for a second set of replacement lip seals which you can change out with the boat still in the water as you don’t have to remove the Prop Shaft to replace them; just pry the old ones forward, cut them off and slide the new ones into place.


PXL_20210129_124446081Last part of installing the SureSeal system is to provide a pressurized flow of fresh sea water into the Prop Shaft Tube which travels down the tube and lubricates the Cutlass bearing which supports the Prop Shaft as it exits the boat.

One of the reasons I chose to locate the Silver Heat Exchanger you see in the Upper Right was to be able to tap into its drain plug on the salt water side and use this as the source of pressurized salt water for the SureSeal.  Nice short hose run and Cihan had that all hooked up in no time.  The second Red hose on the Left goes up along the Aft wall of the ER with a ball valve on the end of it so that I can check the salt water flow rate when we first start up and from time to time afterwards and ensure that there is at least 4L/min / 1USG/min when the engine is idling.
PXL_20210129_124414968.MPBoth those little Big jobs checked off the list and this is what the finished result looks like when peering down into the space Christine has now vacated on the outside of the Aft wall of the ER.  Silver Gardner Coolant Heat Exchanger bottom right, Tides Marine SureSeal middle Left and Red Prop Flange middle Right and the Red Nogva Gearbox Oil Heat Exchanger at the top.

To keep the ER air tight a 6mm AL plate is bolted with a gasket over top and covered wtih the same composite grid floor plates as the rest of the Workshop and ER.
Heat Exchangers labelledCihan checked off another Big little job by plumbing the Sea Water and Engine Coolant water lines up at the forward Starboard/Right corner of Mr. Gee and the ER.  It is pretty busy up there so I’ve labelled some of this plumbing to help you make sense of it.  Can be a bit confusing as there are three fluids running around here; Sea Water that comes in via the Sea Chest just visible on the far middle Right here and through the Strainer and Manifold on its way to the Jabsco Impeller Pump and then out of that Pump and into the Engine Oil Heat Exchanger where it runs Aft exiting out and into that Silver Sea Water Heat Exchanger you saw up above in the SureSeal installation sequence.

Hope you got all that because YES children that WILL be on the Test on Friday!

Driving Big Red #2

Electrodyne #2 jack shaft labelledOver on the opposite Port/Left side of Mr. Gee I finally have the drive system for our second Electrodyne 250Ah @ 24V alternator all designed and the adapters all machined so time to get them all installed.  You may recall this photo from THIS previous blog post about installing what I call Big Red #2 and how I intended to drive it from the PTO or Power Take Off on the Gardner using a Jack Shaft I had from a previous job.
Jackshaft renderThis is a quick screen shot from my Fusion 360 design for the adapters at either end of the Red JackShaft.  Green cylinder on the far Left is the Output shaft from the Gardner PTO, Purple is the AL adaptor to couple the Jackshaft to the PTO and at the far Right in Gold is the steel multi V-belt drive pulley that came with the Electrodyne which I will machine with four threaded holes to bolt the other end of the Red Jackshaft to. 


Note: Jackshaft simplified here to just a rod with flanges at either end.


PXL_20210130_125654649This is the PTO from the Gardner with that Purple aluminium adaptor in the rendering above now pushed onto the Green PTO Output shaft and secured with four round hex head through bolts. 

The Red Flange on the front U-joint end of the JackShaft barely visible on the Right will bolt to that AL adaptor with four more M6 SS bolts.
PXL_20210130_125702007This is the Aft end of the JackShaft where this U-joint will be similarly bolted to that steel 8V pulley on Big Red #2.
PXL_20210130_125713105The day came to an end at this point yesterday so not quite finished but this shot will show you how the whole JackShaft will connect the power from the PTO back to Big Red #2.  This monster Electrodyne alternator could absorb as much as 10HP at full 250 amps of output which the gear driven PTO can put out easily and this Cardan or Jack Shaft should be more than up to the task.

Stay tuned for more though folks on the final installation of Big Red #2 next week AND just wait till you see the sweet setup I’ve come up with to drive Big Red #1 using a cogged timing belt setup that is now almost done.

Well Sand My Bottom!

PXL_20210125_083618470Also not quite done but work continued this past week on getting the bottom underwater portion of the hull all primed and filled in preparation for applying the silicone based Foul Release paint, International InterSleek 1100SR.

The Paint Crew finished applying all the epoxy filler to smooth out all the welds and create a sleek smooth surface for the InterSleek 1000SR Foul Release top coat to come.

You can see some of the filled welds around the Prop Tunnel above and
PXL_20210125_113912527….. the filleted edges around the AL threaded mounting disk for the Zinc on the Rudder.  The circle on the Right is the filled in through hole we put in the Rudder to make it possible to remove the Prop Shaft without having to drop the Rudder.  Because we hope to not need to remove the Prop Shaft for many years this hole is filled in to provide a fully flush curved surface on the Rudder sides to maximize a smooth laminar flow of water over the Rudder.
PXL_20210125_113934869.MPSanding the first coat of epoxy filler on the Keel and Prop Tunnel into smooth large radius coves.
PXL_20210126_114206167….. and the Aft Depth Sounder transducer.
PXL_20210126_114219496….  and one of the 5 Sea Chests.
PXL_20210126_114321477By end of the week they had the last of the 5 coats of International epoxy primer rolled as you can see around the Bow Thruster Tunnel, another smaller Sea Chest intake and Zinc mounting disk up near the bow.
PXL_20210126_114402759Final coat of epoxy primer being rolled on Aft and we’ll see the application of the InterSleek 1100SR next week.

Grand Dame of Dyneema!

PXL_20210129_144503223.MPLest you should think that The Captain only lays down on the job, this will prove that she sometimes sits! 
PXL_20210129_144634649But Christine has become and expert Dyneema splicer after doing so many as she installs  all the Lifelines around the Main Deck.  This are the AL Stanchions with their Lifelines now in place on the Aft end of the Port/Left side.  The Tender will come On/Off this side so these 3 LifeLines have Pelican Hooks that are easy to release so we can then pull up the Stanchions and roll up the whole setup and stow when the Tender is aboard.
PXL_20210129_144622216Closer view of how these Pelican Hooks and Thimbles work.
PXL_20210129_144628144You start to appreciate how Christine’s Dyneema splicing expertise has developed so quickly when you start to count up all the splices required for each LifeLine in the system we’ve come up with.  On the far Right is an endless loop that wraps around the AL Stanchion through a small AL D-ring to keep it in place and a SS Thimble captured on the end.  Last step of this will be to lash the loop around the SS Thimble closed so that when it is undone the Thimble can’t come out.


Tylaska Dyneema AL rings donutsLooking down the LifeLines to the Left you can see another splice at the Left end of the Pelican Hook and then further Aft/Left two more around these Black anodized Donuts or Rings you can see further to the Left.  Christine leaves a gap of about 80-100mm / 3-4” between these two rings and then wraps multiple lashings between them to tension the life lines.  And of course each of these Rings require yet another splice!

INTERIOR UPDATES:

PXL_20210125_091302262.MPHilmi and Ramazan continued their work inside Möbius this past week and we also find more of Captain Christine’s fingerprints up here at the Main Helm where she and Hilmi have been working to install and connect Boat Computer #1 you see here on the Port/Left side of the Main Helm Chair.
PXL_20210125_091330861Its ultimate home will be inside this space behind the 50” Monitor on the outside and this AC/Heating Air Handler inside.
PXL_20210125_091339930This space is normally covered by this hinged Rosewood back with a recess for the adjustable mounting system for the 50” monitor that doubles as both our movie watching entertainment screen when on anchor and then one of 4 screens for boat data and navigation when underway.
PXL_20210126_075505032Down in the Guest Cabin Ramazan is completing the last of the Ado LVT vinyl plank flooring. 
PXL_20210126_075450320.MPWhile the smallest by surface area it has ELEVEN removeable sections above the bolt on tank access hatches below so this area is taking the most time.

Pull out Bed in the Upper Left and Christine’s Office desk on the Right.
PXL_20210127_110131943.MPSix of those removable floor sections all weighted down while the adhesive dries.
PXL_20210126_153010788.MPRemovable floor sections?

What removable floor sections?
PXL_20210129_095901473Ramzan then stepped up his game (sorry) by moving up to install the vinyl flooring on the steps leading up from the SuperSalon to the Aft Deck. 

Another tricky and time consuming bit of detail as each step has one of these handrail posts he needs to go around.
PXL_20210129_095827835Which, as you can see, he had no trouble doing eXtremely well!
And that’s a wrap for the week that was January 25-30, 2021.  Yikes!  The first month of 2021 gone already??? 

Well at least it puts us another week closer to LAUNCH so as with “being shafted” that is all a very good thing.

Thanks for joining us for yet another episode here at Möbius.World.  REALLY appreciate and value you doing so and please feel encouraged to add your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Hope to see you here again next week.

-Wayne


There will be NO Slip Sliding Away on Möbius! XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Progress Update Jan 4-8, 2021

And 2021 is off to rapid start as the first week of the year has already whipped by me in a flash.  Very busy times here as we all push to finish XPM78-01 Möbius and get her in the water by the new target Launch Date of February 12th!  Which BTW, is now only 33 calendar days and 25 working days from now.  Yikes!!

However, as we all learn over time, deadlines are good things to help us keep our eyes on the prize and get things done so as to ensure that there is no “Slip-Sliding Away” of our Launch Date!  Therefore, I am going to stick with using this fixed Launch Date to help keep the positive pressure on all of us on Team Möbius to “get ‘er done” and as my 4 year old granddaughter Blair says (with gusto!) “Let’s DO this!”

I’ll take that advise to heart with my introduction to this Weekly Progress Update and jump right into this week’s Show & Tell of what all happened aboard the Good Ship Möbius this past week of Jan 4-8, 2021

Non-Stick on the Bottom:


PXL_20210104_121016219

Continuing the very rewarding trend of late of hitting lots of different milestones of this build, work began this week on preparing the bottom of the hull for its foul release bottom paint.  First step was to clear out all the equipment and materials which had been accumulating underneath the hull on the shop floor.
PXL_20210104_121024683.MPIt helps to have a forklift of course so it didn’t take too long to move everything elsewhere at Naval Yachts and have a clear floor space under Möbius to work on.
PXL_20210105_064646565Next up was to get rid of the short little hull support posts and replace them with these longer steel tubes that connect just under the Rub Rails and slope down to the floor where they are secured into the concrete with long lag bolts.

You’ll note too that the upper part of the hull sides have now been covered in plastic to keep their freshly sanded surfaces clean.
PXL_20210104_111758312.MPThe two newest members of Team Möbius, Ali kneeling on the Right and Mehmet standing on the Left, get to work grinding down the welds below the waterline and removing the layer  of Aluminium Oxide Al2O3that has formed since these hull plates were first welded in place over two years ago. The automatic and rapid formation of Al2O3 is one of the big benefits of building hulls from Aluminium as it is a very had and durable protective layer that prevents any further oxidization or corrosion.  However Al2O3 is equally good at “protecting” the hull from paint, which is part of the reason why we are leaving all the exposed aluminium on Möbius unpainted. The one exception is below the waterline where we need to prevent marine growth from forming as this creates a lot of drag on the hull as it slides through the water.
PXL_20210105_072426269.MPSo you need to remove all the Al2O3 before the first coat of epoxy primer goes on.  This is the first round of removing the Al2O3 and then just before the first coat of primer is sprayed on, they will give it a light sanding with orbital sanders and a wipe down with Acetone to make sure the AL surfaces are completely clean and oxide free so the primer will bond well
PXL_20210105_074437093

The only item below the waterline that does not get painted is the big 1m OD beautiful Bronze Nogva CPP propeller, though later on, it too will get some special treatment to prevent fouling as even the slightest bit of grown or roughness on a propeller blade causes severe reduction in transferring power from the prop to the water.
PXL_20210105_074446979The special tube we cut through the Rudder can now be be filled in so Uğur tacked this elliptical AL plate to block off the hole for now.  Whenever we might need to pull out the prop shaft, this hole allows me to do so without having to remove the Rudder which can add a lot of time to the prop shaft Re & Re.  This will get covered with some epoxy filler and sanded flush with the surface of the Rudder plates as a super slippery Rudder also helps a lot to increase the efficiency of the Rudder and Steering overall.
PXL_20210104_132711290Another important part of the preparation for the bottom paint is taking off the upper edge of the “Boot Stripe” at the very top to make the transition from the bottom paint to the unpainted aluminium above.  This is made SO much easier now that we have laser levels to use rather than the laborious process of measuring every few feet as I’ve had to do in the past to establish what you hope is a level straight line.  In keeping with the “lean & mean” exterior esthetic, the Boot Stripe and the bottom paint will both be Black but the Boot Stripe will be glossy Black Polyurethane whereas the Bottom Paint will be the matt finish of the silicone based International InterSleek 1100SR


For those not so familiar with bottom paints, most boats use an Anti-Fouling type of paint which prevents micro organisms from growing on it by having various biocide chemicals such as copper, tin and now more modern toxins which try to prevent growth from forming.  This has been done for centuries with many old wooden boats having their bottoms sheathed with sheets of thin copper.
PXL_20210104_132630120Looking nice and straight to me!

Anti-Foul type bottom paint doesn’t last too long, 6 months to 2 years max, before it either wears off or looses all its anti fouling chemicals and you have to haul out, remove all the old and paint on new coats which is neither quick nor inexpensive, to say nothing of the environmental concerns.
PXL_20210104_132658391.MPInstead of “Anti” foul we are going to use international InterSleek 1100SR which is a Foul RELEASE type of solution which in the simplest terms is a coating of silicone fluoropolymer which is akin to the non-stick coating such as Teflon on frying pans.  When I was a young boy I was struck by the idea of “Better Living Through Chemistry” and my daughter Lia is an Organic Chemist so this more modern and much more effective different kind of chemistry that creates Foul Release paint was a no-brainer for me.
PXL_20210104_132600948.MPA little kick up at the stern end of the bottom paint to add a bit of flair!

When moving, nothing sticks to the hull but when we sit at anchor for weeks or months at a time, grown will still form on our InterSleek bottom BUT it all comes off with a simple wipe with a cloth or sponge so the amount of time and effort it will take us to “dive the bottom” and clean the hull will be drastically reduced from our previous boats even though Möbius has a much larger bottom surface.
PXL_20210105_121710267[3]Uğur looked after one more bit of preparation for the bottom painting by sculpting the Exhaust Exit pipe which is not far above the waterline and below the top of the Black Boot Stripe so it too will be painted.

PXL_20210105_121658997I will talk more about the Foul Release and InterSleek1100 paint as we start applying it in the coming weeks, so to finish up for now let me just add that Foul Release type bottom paints and InterSleek are not well known by most boat owners but it has been the norm for large commercial and military ships since the 90’s.  Based on their experience the InterSleek1100 should last for around 5 to 7+  years, so we are eXtremely anxious to see how it performs for us on Möbius.  Stay tuned for the next couple of years to find out! Winking smile

Non-Slip up on Top:

PXL_20210107_073546864.MPJust as important as keeping our bottom Non-Stick to prevent growth, we need to keep all our decks and floors up on top to be very Non-Skid to prevent us from slipping when walking around, often in bare wet feet and a energetically moving boat.

For all our decks and other exterior AL surfaces we are using what we think is the ultimate Non-Slip material called TreadMaster which has the tag line “The Original Anti Slip Deck Covering” which has lasted for more than 20 years for many of our friends. 

In previous weekly updates you’ve seen the Team covering all the Main Decks and stairs with Treadmaster and this week the finished off the last remaining items such as these AL stairs from the Aft Deck down into the Workshop.
PXL_20210107_073556384We will leave all the “Slip Sliding Away” to Simon & Garfunkel while we stay put safe with our feel solidly in place on our TreadMaster and that composite grid flooring down in the Workshop and ER thanks very much!
PXL_20210108_142941793We left what could be the most dangerous or at least slip-prone deck for last; these narrow slopped Side Decks that flank the SkyBridge.  Orkan was able to use all the left over TreadMaster from doing the Main Decks to cut out all these smaller “tiles” of TreadMaster to cover these Side Decks and here he has them all cut out and flipped over upside down ready for the AL Side Decks to be sanded and cleaned.
PXL_20210108_151342777Faruk and Ali could now get busy mixing up the West Systems epoxy adhesive and gluing each piece of TreadMaster into its final positions on the Side Deck surfaces and squeezing out the epoxy to every edge with the HD roller you see here in the foreground.
PXL_20210104_150729359

And in the words of Jean-Louis, Voilà c’est fini!!

TreadMaster is now all done and one more milestone achieved.  Well done Team Möbius!!

Much ADO about Non-Slip Inside Too!

PXL_20201231_064414784Last week you may recall seeing Ramazan finish installing the ADO vinyl LVT flooring in the Master Cabin and he has that now all finished.
PXL_20201231_064536530Keeping ourselves safe at sea requires that ALL our floors are very Non-Slippery and as you can perhaps make out in this photo, we chose these Ado LVT vinyl floor planks in large part due to the highly textured nature they have that is similar to old well worn woodgrain on patio or pool decks.
PXL_20210105_153101626His final job to finish the Master Cabin was the two stairs leading up to the Port/Left side of the bed and the removable access lid beside the Shower.  These are the only vinyl flooring that is glued down, the rest is all “floating” so it can expand and contract in different temperatures.  Here is is using some very heavy weights to keep these pieces flat and squished onto the underlying marine plywood while the adhesive dries overnight.
PXL_20210107_074118757Master Cabin flooring all finished, Ramazan moved onward and upward to the SuperSalon and moved everything off the floors in there and gave all the plywood base a thorough vacuuming and cleanup.
PXL_20210106_105852531First task for the SuperSalon floor was to install the wood framing and rigid insulation on the large hinged hatch that provides access down into the cavernous Basement that lies below the AL floor of the whole SuperSalon.
PXL_20210107_074041873After checking that each plywood floor panel was solidly screwed down, Ramazan stared to do his layout for the floor planks.
PXL_20210107_074157941Starting with this reference line for laying down each row of planks perfectly parallel to the centerline of the boat.
PXL_20210107_113745764.MPClick – Click, assemble one row of planks.

Click – Click, lock that row into the previous one laid down.


PXL_20210108_143021368.MPRinse and Repeat, with lots of careful scribing and fitting around all the radiused Rosewood toe kicks surrounding all the cabinetry.

Screens, Screens and more Screens!


PXL_20210106_095311058Winding back the clock by a few days, another eXtremely big milestone for Christine and I happened this week and this photo should give plenty of clues as to what this was.

Can you guess what we are up to here?
PXL_20210106_095319924Hint.

It has something to do with these two unfilled spaces front and center at the Main Helm.
PXL_20210106_095328531That’s right!  Time to unbox and install all our beautiful big, sunlight readable, touch screen LiteMax helm monitors; two 19” here in the Main Helm and then two more 24” up on the SkyBridge Helm and then on each side of the Main Helm will be another 43” monitor on the Right and a 50” TV/Monitor on the Left.

After a LOT of research and some help from a fellow passage maker, Peter Hayden over on “Adventures of Tanglewood”  we finally tracked down the OEM manufacturer of most marine MFD’s and monitors and bought all five Helm monitors from LiteMax in New Taipei City, Taiwan. 
PXL_20210106_100430158The two 19” Main Helm monitors are LiteMax NavPixel Marine model NPD1968 and this link will give you all the technical details for those wishing to know more.  The specs that mattered most to us are that these are fully sunlight readable with 1600 nits (a good phone screen is about 300 nits), AOT touch, high shock & vibration resistance, IP65 waterproof and can be powered from 9-36V DC.
PXL_20210106_100538201Both monitors slide into this hinged plate above the Main Helm dashboard and allow us to tilt these monitors however we wish to have the best line of sight and least reflection.  Captain Christine is peeling off the protective plastic layer to check out the non-reflective screens below.
PXL_20210106_100646072Another feature we value highly is that these monitors have physical and easy to reach control knobs and buttons.  Always frustrating to try to figure out how to increase the brightness as daylight arrives and you’ve had the screens turned down close to black for night time viewing.
PXL_20210106_102735742Didn’t take us long to get the two 19” monitors mounted into the Main Helm and so we moved up to the SkyBridge where these two openings on the Upper Helm Station were begging to be filled.
PXL_20210106_111325846.MPFirst we removed the rear AL panel to give us access to the inside so we could tighten down the very well done mounting screw setup on these monitors.

We also put in a layer of thin EPDM foam rubber to fully seal each monitor into the AL Helm Station.
PXL_20210106_104706261.MPThey fit into their openings like a glove and as you can see the big opening we had designed into this AL Helm Station provided easy access all around each monitor to secure them tightly against each frame.
PXL_20210106_104713877These 24” monitors are LiteMax NavPixel model NPD2425 with similar specs as the one’s down below.  Plenty of connection port choices on the back including the power terminals on the far Left which will be connected to our 24V DC system and then via DVI-D to our onboard boat computers.
PXL_20210106_104643455As you might see reflected in the plastic protective covers, I took this shot with my camera at eye height when you are sitting in the SkyBridge Helm Chair so this will give you a good sense of the perspective you’ll have when conning the boat from up here with great visibility of the entire Bow and Anchor Deck up front.
IMG_0974When I wasn’t looking Captain Christine snapped this shot of me finishing up the installation under her watchful eye.

We are eXtremely excited to get these bad boys all powered up and connected to our boat computers but that will have to wait until next week so stay tuned for that.

POWER!

PXL_20210105_070759362Speaking of powering things up, whenever Mr. Gee is running we have up to 24kW of power from the two Electrodyne 250A @28V alternators he is spinning down in the Engine Room.  Here is a peek at the cabling that Hilmi completed this week which takes the AC output from the stator windings directly to the externally mounted Electrodyne Rectifiers over on the far Right side of the Workshop.
PXL_20210105_140040082.MPEach of these Electrodyne beautiful brutes has two individual alternators inside and so there are six cables coming out of each alternator to carry the 3 phase AC current.  So Hilmi  put his hydraulic lug press to good use crimping all 12 lugs onto each cable.
PXL_20210105_141320446That shot up above is of Big Red #2 which is driven by the PTO off the bottom Left of Mr. Gee which you can see a wee bit of in the very bottom Right of this photo.

On the Upper Left here, this is Big Red #1 which is mounted up above on this 40mm/ 1 5/8” AL plate I fabricated and bolted onto the pad on Mr. Gee’s cast aluminium crankcase just for this purpose.  This will be driven by a cogged “timing belt” setup which I am busy fabricating right now and I will show you more of next week.

Here though you can see the other six cables coming out of the Junction Box atop Big Red #1 on their way over and out of the ER to connect to the Rectifiers that are staying nice and cool out in the Workshop.

Mr. Gee Gets Cagey

Those with eXtremely sharp eyes and memory might notice a new addition to Mr. Gee this week?


Mr. Gee cage   exhaust support modelKeeping with our KISS or Keep It Simple Safe & Smart approach, I designed a dual purpose AL pipe “cage” to wrap around Mr. Gee to provide solid hand holds whenever you are near him while he’s running.  This then also creates the perfect base for the four support rods that go from the pipes of this cage up to the exhaust dry stack system up above which I will show you more of next week.

PXL_20210104_080045592I pulled off the 2D drawings from my Fusion 360 3D mode above, sent them over to Uğur on WhatsApp and he and Nihat got busy transforming these 2D drawings into 40mm AL pipe reality down on the shop floor.
PXL_20210104_080051729Same technique you’ve seen us use before, Uğur and Nihat create these large radius bends by cutting a series of slots on the inside of the curve in the 40mm thick wall AL pipe, bends them and then tacks them in place.
PXL_20210104_111702902.MPWe then test fit them in place on Mr. Gee and once tweaked into just the right fit Uğur welds the slots closed.
PXL_20210104_111706646As you might notice on the model rendering above, each “staple” shaped rail will be bolted to AL plates that span the motor mounts we fabricated here at Naval.
PXL_20210104_132736071.MP

Uğur could now weld on the 20mm / 3/4” thick base plates and weld all the bend slots closed.
PXL_20210105_064707202Nihat picks up with his angle grinder and quickly cleans up all the welds to create smooth soft curves.
PXL_20210105_132358340That gives Uğur time to go back into the ER and drill and tap all the threaded holes in the Engine Mount plates so the finished staples can be bolted in place.

Uğur and Nihat were only available Monday and Tuesday this week so this is where they left off and will pick up again tomorrow (Monday) morning to bolt in the longitudinal pipes and start fabricating the support rods that attach to the four AL tabs you can see they have now welded to the tops of each stable rails and will connect to the SS dry stack exhaust pipes you can see here.

We’ve Been Hosed!

PXL_20210104_081956996.MPOur eXtremely productive plumber Cihan was also with us for Monday and Tuesday and he made great progress plumbing in a lot of hoses and other items so let’s check that out.
PXL_20210104_081940739This is outside the Aft Stbd/Right corner of the Engine Room Enclosure with the plate removed that covers the far end where the prop shaft enters the ER and connects to the Nogva CPP Servo Reduction Gearbox via the Blue (purple looking here) dripless Tides Marine shaft seal. 
PXL_20210104_081947563.MPUp above and off to the far Right side of the prop shaft, you can just see the silver coloured AL heat exchanger with the bronze elbow which is what Cihan is now plumbing with this white hose.

This is the heat exchanger that cools down the fresh water/antifreeze mix that circulates through the inside of Mr. Gee and that is what this white hose carries to/from Mr. Gee and the heat exchanger.

If you look at the black composite end plate on this heat exchanger you can see that Cihan has already connected the hose that carries the cool sea water from the Sea Chest in the ER.
PXL_20210104_082003577Inside the ER on the Right side of Mr. Gee you can now see where two of the white sea hoses connect to Mr. Gee.  The top hose in this photo will carry fresh water coolant from the integrated water pump on Mr. Gee and the bottom hose carries sea water out of the long Bronze Engine Oil Heat Exchanger back to the Coolant Heat exchanger we saw in the  photos above.
PXL_20210105_131800135My apologies for not having time to draw up some better illustrations to explain how these heat exchangers all interconnect but for now this photo will show you two of the pumps in this system.  The round aluminium pump in the center of the photo above is the integral Garner centrifugal water pump which pumps fresh water/antifreeze coolant back from that silver AL heat exchanger we saw earlier.


PXL_20210105_131741168 The Bronze Jabsco pump on the Right is one that I am in the process of mounting and it is the impeller pump that pulls sea water from the ER Supply Sea Chest into the “IN” labelled port and then out of this pump into that bronze elbow with the Blue painters tape up above.  This sea water then runs the length of that Bronze Engine Oil Heat Exchanger bolted to the side of Mr. Gee and exits via the white hose you can see two photos up from here and goes down to that silver AL heat exchanger we saw at the beginning. 

The longer white hose in this photo carries Mr. Gee’s fresh coolant back to that silver AL Heat Exchanger.

Clear as mud to most of you and a pathetic job by this former mechanics teacher but best I can do for now folks.
PXL_20210105_071052003The other new addition this past week was Cihan’s installation of this Blue Beauty which is the big “sand” filter which removes most of the sea critters and debris from the salt water supply for the Delfin 200L/min watermaker.

This is not found in most boats and are normally used in large swimming pool installations, but I long ago discovered that these are the “secret” to extending the life of the other two sea water filters on the watermaker last for months rather than weeks.  This filter is filled with a special kind of sand known as Zeolite and it is the first line of defense to filter out the sea water being pumped out of the Sea Chest into the watermaker.
PXL_20210105_071100105There is a six way valve on top which you use to change between running the seat water through the filter and back flushing it in reverse once in a while to fully clean out all the debris that has been collected by the Zeolite sand.  Simple, easy and eXtremely effective.
PXL_20210105_071146113Super simple in design and to use and plumb with just three ports:  Top Right SS hose barb is where sea water is pumped into the filter by the low pressure high volume 24V pump connected to the Sea Chest.  Bottom Right is where the cleaned sea water exits and is pumped over to the two standard filters behind the watermaker.  Far Left with the SS elbow is where the dirty back flushed water exits and goes out the exiting sea chest in the ER.
PXL_20210105_144625975In the background on the wall behind the white watermaker housing on the bottom Right, you can see the three other WM filters; the pair on the Left are the Primary/Secondary sea water filters and the one off to the Right is a carbon filter to remove any harmful chemicals in the fresh water you use for back flushing the WM at the end of a run.
As usual of late I’ve got more photos to show you than I have time and dinner is once again waiting with my eXtremely patient and beautiful Bride on this Sunday evening so I’m going to call this a wrap for now and do my best to cover more next week.

Thanks for joining me on this first posting of 2021 and I hope it helps in some small way to get your new year off to a good start.  How about if YOU start your New Year off by adding your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below?  They are all true gifts to me and much appreciated!

See you next week.

-Wayne




What if Beauty & the Beast had a Love Child? XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 07-12, 2020

With Team Möbius back to work and augmented by additional sub-contractors the rate of progress was at an all time high this past week so there is a LOT to Show & Tell you about this week.  I will apologise in advance that this week’s Progress Update may be a bit rushed both because I have so much to cover and it is now already mid afternoon on Sunday here.  But before I jump right into all the progress updates, some other news from around the shipyard for you.

FINAL PLANS are SIGNED & SEALED!

Baris & Dincer signing Addendum v2-5The biggest news for Christine and I this week is that we finalized all the details for the final finishing of XPM78-01 Möbius with Naval Yachts and signed off on all the new addendum documents, which is what Baris (left) and Dincer, the founding brothers of Naval Yachts are smiling about here! 
With projects of this size and complexity and especially for such a unique first XPM series build, there are a LOT of changes and adjustments along the way and a LOT of equipment, materials and sub-contractors that needed to be ordered and it has taken all of us more hours than we would like to know, to sort out all these details and get them all formally documented.  So we were elated to have all four of us, Builders + Owners, sign off on this Friday afternoon.

Wayne Looses 1 old Titanium Screw and Gains 7 new ones!

Immediately after we all signed the new addendum on Friday, my elation transformed into something else when I spent several hours “under the knife” in the Dentist’s office!  Another reason why this blog post will be a bit rushed as I’m not quite up to full  speed again just yet. 
For those curious to know, the scorecard from that surgery is that Wayne is now:

MINUS:

  • one molar and
  • one titanium screw (one of more than a hundred I have from a nasty motorcycle accident back in 1997) but now plus 6 titanium implant

PLUS:

  • 7 titanium implant screws
  • some extra jawbone (grafts)
  • 29 stitches

dental-implants-massachusetts-nhI won’t bore you with any more details but given the somewhat technical nature of my posts and for those curious about dental implants, as I was, here is these 2 illustrations will give you the basic picture of what’s involved.

implant2Now it is just a waiting game to get the stitches removed in 10 days and then let the jawbone and implants merge for two months or so before I go back to have the ceramic (Zirconia) crowns put in and I can chew again!

Möbius gets a New Neighbor

PXL_20201202_073019553.MP

This actually happened two weeks ago so I’m a bit delinquent in posting this but we now have a new neighbor off of Möbius’ Stbd Aft corner. 
PXL_20201202_070022961.MPShe’s a Turkish flagged boat “Celeb” and is in the yard at Naval Yachts for some relatively minor work and some out-of-the-water winter storage.
PXL_20201202_073028119Once again, our friendly neighborhood 72 wheel Yellow boat mover was called in for this move and it all came off without a hitch as usual.
PXL_20201207_063306545There were more changes to the neighborhood a few blocks away from us over on the Free Zone side of the harbour where they are completely redoing the shoreside facilities to put in an all new humungous dry dock and other launching facilities.
PXL_20201207_063311854This work has been going on for quite a few months already with the removal of the existing concrete walls, the whole rail launch and TraveLift launch facilities and a whole lot of dirt to enlarge the water area.

That leaves the Free Zone with no launching facilities but fortunately just on the other side of this harbor in the background here, is Setur Marina and so the authorities can open up the gates and let the boat movers bring boats in/out of the marina and into the Free Zone. 

With Möbius’ launch date *hopefully* coming up early in the New Year it is likely that we may need to launch into Setur Marina rather than inside the Free Zone harbour.  Either way works fine as the emphasis for us is LAUNCH ASAP!!


PXL_20201207_063309337This pile driver has been running non-stop 24/7 for the past week putting in over 20 so far of these steel cylinders which I presume will be filled with concrete to form the underlying foundation for all the new concrete and dry-dock equipment to come.
OK, with this week’s episode of  “What’s New in the Neighborhood”, let’s get back to the shipyard and get you caught up on this past week’s progress on finishing XPM78-01 Möbius.

LITTLE JOBS = BIG DEAL:

As I did in last week’s posting, let me quickly run you through a set of several “little jobs” which got looked after this past week.  Some of you sent in comments noting that you liked the more rapid-fire sequences of work so I will repeat that here and please do let me know how well it is working or not by putting your comments in the “Join the Discussion” box at the bottom of every blog posting.

And as I noted last week these may be “little” in terms of amount of work, these jobs are all play very important roles themselves and perhaps most important of all are what define a FINISHED yacht!

PXL_20201207_065803494First good example of how these little jobs can be so important was the finishing of the door into the Engine Room.  Uğur and Nihat had fabricated and mounted this door many months ago but it needed to be fully insulated with fireproof EPDM insulation covered with the laminated aluminium/composite sandwich AlucoBond material you have seen being used to cover all the walls and ceilings of the Engine Room and Workshop.

They started by welding in these short lengths of aluminium L-bars for the AlucoBond to be fastened to.
PXL_20201207_074407324Then Nihat cut the 50mm / 2” thick EPDM foam insulation and fitted each piece into their compartments.
PXL_20201207_091641911.MPAlucoBond is then cut to size and screwed in place.
PXL_20201207_091651554.MPUğur than installs two of the same beautiful Bofor Dogs & Latches you saw him installing in the big AL hatches up on the main deck for the Forepeak and Engine Room.
PXL_20201208_075045601Then the door can be remounted on its hinges while it awaits the 26mm thick tempered glass window to be installed to complete this door.
PXL_20201208_082758414Next up for the same basic treatment was this hatch that goes into the floor in the SuperSalon to provide the only access to the cavernous Basement which sits under the entire SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20201208_085739733.MPSame 50mm EPDM foam is inserted into each of the little bays formed by the reinforcing AL stringers of this hatch, which is upside down here BTW.

Then Uğur spreads on a light coating of contact cement while ……….
PXL_20201208_085748314.MP……. Nihat cuts out the thick foil covered fireproof cloth that will cover and protect the EPDM insulation.
PXL_20201208_105411719With the foil cloth all glued down, Nihat finished off the edges with some AL foil tape and this hatch was then mounted to the awaiting piano hinge in the Salon floor opening into the Basement.
PXL_20201210_091317725The first of many “little” jobs in getting the below the waterline portion of the hull all prepped for the upcoming application of all the epoxy primer preceding spraying on the International InterSleek 1100SR Foul Release bottom paint we have decided to use.

Here Uğur has removed the propeller blades on the Vetus Bow Thruster and sanded all the internal AL surfaces.
PXL_20201208_094130489I was able to pull my weight a little bit this week as well by finishing off some similarly small but important jobs, as well as one quite BIG BEAUTIFUL BEASTLY job on Mr. Gee, our Gardner 6LXB engine.  More on that later.

The Black cone and disk up near the top Left here is the front end of the Chain based Hand Cranking system that I am now starting to mount.  I have pulled it far forward here in order to mount the cast AL coolant tank.

Below this tank on the Right is the secondary fuel filter and return line and in the weeks ahead you will be seeing much more of that flat rectangular Pad in the bottom Left where I will soon be mounting one of the Big Red Electrodyne alternators.
PXL_20201208_094136808A classic example of how Gardner leaves nothing to chance is this cast in place detail of how you need to use the correct type of anti-freeze and fill it to the correct level.
PXL_20201210_143328346Big Red #2 near the bottom Left with blue taped box, as I’ve taken to calling the second 250A @ 28V Electrodyne alternators is the much bigger job I worked on this past week and I’ll cover that in more detail a bit later in this post.  With this 2nd alternator now securely mounted to the side of Mr. Gee I was able to finish installing these beautiful copper oil lines that snake their way around Mr. Gee to carry his lifeblood engine oil to and from where it needs to go.


PXL_20201210_143324987Large AL unit taking up the center of of the photo above and aft end here, is the complete fuel pump and mechanical injection system.  The six vertical (5 Black 1 Red) levers you see in the photo above allow you to hand prime each of the 6 fuel injectors as well as shut off one injector at a time to check performance while running.

Burgundy cylinder in the top middle is the secondary oil filter housing with its copper oil lines bringing oil to/from this filter.
PXL_20201210_143238782A few more finishing touches on Mr. Gee’s Stbd/Right side such as the exiting salt water hose now connected to the rear of this gorgeous cast bronze engine oil cooler, and the vertical braided SS mesh exhaust connector in the upper Left here is now bolted to the aft end of the cast iron exhaust manifold.
PXL_20201210_143154653In the bottom middle of the photo above and up close here, the Black 24V Starter is now fully installed and connected.  Two Red cables as one is from the twin FireFly G31 starter batteries and the other cable can connect the starter to the massive House Battery Bank in case the starter batteries should ever not be working.

Beauty & the Beast’s Love Child?

Gardner 6LXB CLOSEUP alternator strap mount exploded diagram

Take note in the 2 photos above of how Gardner attaches the starter to the massive cast aluminium crankcase with that silver strap and you can see in this illustration from the 6LXB Parts Manual how they attached the standard Gardner alternator in the same way over on the opposite side.

PXL_20201130_091059790I wanted to mount Big Red #2, which is what I’ve come to call the second Electrodyne alternator, to the same place that Gardner used but would Big Red fit?  Only one way to find out; try it!  As did Gardner, I first made 2 shims from some AL 10mm plate to adjust the radius of the cast in place ribs to match Big Red’s 188mm / 7.4” outside diameter and bolted them in place as you can see here.
PXL_20201130_091053884Here is an uncluttered straight on shot of the mounting base for Big Red #2.  Fuel pump bowl in the upper Left corner, bottom of the cast AL injection pump running across the top and you can see the two “nubbins” where the hinge pin will slide through to hold the forked bolt that tightens the flat strap to cinch the alternator up tight.
PXL_20201127_132125627That forked bolt is part # 11/19/20 in the illustration above but with Big Red being a bit on the Beastly side of the girth scale the original forked bolt was too short so I whipped up this new larger and longer version out of some SS plate and threaded rod.
PXL_20201127_134248126.MPI fashioned the fork out of a small block of SS and tapped it for a M10 threaded rod and threaded the two together.  A SS nut to lock it in place and then for added safety and strength I thought it best to TIG weld the nut and threaded rod to the fork.
PXL_20201123_121423664I will give you that I can be given to some hyperbole and eXaggeration from time to time but I think you need to give me that it is no eXaggeration to suggest that “shoehorn fit” describes this situation?!!
PXL_20201123_121407320Each GE 250-24 Electrodyne alternator tips the scales at 40 kg/88 lbs and so again I will make my case that calling these Red Beauties Beasts is also no mere Hodgins Hyperbole!
PXL_20201125_125418339As you might imagine, I had to take Big Red #2 in and out quite a few times as I adjusted its position and tested out the strap mounting setup to get that all to work out and still  clear everything.  Fortunately and as I’ll explain in a bit, took advantage of the fact that I had to take these alternators apart so I was able to cut their weight down quite a bit which made all my test mounting a bit less muscle building.
PXL_20201130_090928226With the alternator temporarily held in place with some wood blocks I could test out the fit of this Black strap which is has a 10mm / 3/8” pin that slides through the bottom as you can see in the illustration above and the bottom of this photo. 

Up at the top you can see the nut on the end of the upper forked bolt what cinches the alternator tight up against the radiused ribs you saw earlier.

I am close here BUT the large copper wires that carry the AC current out of the alternator need to come through that hole in the case across from my fingers, so I need to nudge it forward a wee bit more so the strap clears the hole.
PXL_20201123_121426909Oh, and I also need to make sure that the length of this Jack Shaft with U-joints on each end that I am retrofitting to drive Big Red #2 from the Gardner PTO (Power Take Off) on the Left here.

(click to enlarge any photo)

Electrodyne E 250-24 specs   graphI’m getting ahead of myself a bit so let me stop and provide a quick overview of these Electrodyne E 250-24 alternators that I’ve chosen to use and mount on Mr. Gee which I think will help you see how they truly are the Goldilocks combination or “Love Child” of Beauty and the Beast. 
In addition to these basic specs my primary reasons for choosing these Electrodyne brutes include:

  • truly rugged “beastly” construction and weighing in at 40kg / 88 lbs each
  • Beautiful simplicity with only one moving part, the stator shaft and no moving electrical parts
  • More simplicity being Brushless with no brushes and no brush springs
  • One piece steel “double ended” housing with TWO alternators; one at each end.
  • Remote Rectifier which moves most of the performance robbing heat outside the ER
  • eXceptional life with 20,000 hours  between recommended servicing

PXL_20201124_135938081Here is what one looks like in real life.  The box on top is simply a junction box where the 6 (3 from each alternator)AC current carrying wires emerge from inside the alternator body and connect to six large cables that go to the remote rectifiers outside the ER in the Workshop.
I ordered these alternators directly from Electrodyne in Oklahoma almost 2 years ago and spent a LOT of time with Dale Gould who is the Operations Manager at Electrodyne and he has been truly fabulous to work with on every level from getting these beasts built to the specs we decided upon, getting them shipped to me (not as easy as it sounds) and even creating little how to videos to show me how to do the alterations I needed on my end.  Can’t thank Dale and his team enough nor recommend them more highly to you.

PXL_20201123_125232591In the interim, I ended up changing how and where I was going to mount these two beastly beauties on Mr. Gee and so I now needed change the location of these Junction Boxes from where I had originally asked Dale to position them.  Not a big deal and I always welcome any chance to get “up close and personal” with every bit of kit on Möbius as I’m also the guy that needs to maintain everything and keep us up an running at all times in all conditions.
PXL_20201124_134411083The aluminium Junction Boxes are bolted to the steel housing and to reposition them I needed to re-drill and tap (thread) four new holes for the new position. 

First step was to remove the two pressed on aluminium ROTORS which have all the permanent magnets embedded in them and rotate around a few millimeters away from the stationary Stator coils you see here.
PXL_20201124_134037297With the Non-Drive end Rotor off I could now remove the Rotor on the Drive end by pressing out it and its shaft from the internal hub and bearings inside the case.
PXL_20201124_134032959This close up of the inside of the AL Rotor let’s you see how all the permanent magnets such as the two I’m pointing at here, are embedded into the AL Rotor.
PXL_20201124_120154113I know this is riveting Show & Tell for so many of you, NOT! but the disassembly goes pretty quickly from here so I’ll speed through the process even faster for you from here.

Top Lid comes off the Junction Box enabling me to disconnect all the wires from their studs in the sides of the Junction Box body.
PXL_20201124_115044100Each set of Stator windings, one at each end, can now be unbolted and …….
PXL_20201123_135125891…… pulled off of their tight fit to the central hub inside the housing allowing me to now carefully pull the three large gauge solid copper wires and terminals out through the holes in the housing one at a time.
PXL_20201124_115805591One end Stator windings removed, ready to spin around and do the same to remove the Stator windings on the other end.

Removing 4 Allen head bolts, one seen in the bottom Right here, let’s me remove each Junction Box.
PXL_20201123_151212610Full dis-assembled now!

Possibly resembling Dr. Frankenstein’s workbench I am already LOVING my new Workshop and all 11 meters of workbenches!
PXL_20201124_084516773I marked the new location of the Junction Boxes with felt pen and so now it was a simple matter of lining up the 2 holes in the bottom of the Junction Box with the new holes in the housing and clamping them in position.  I could then use the 4 bolt holes in the Junction Box as a template to mark the corresponding center marks to drill into the housing.
PXL_20201124_105407408I had carefully taped off all access to the inside of the housing to prevent any metal chips or dust from getting inside and it was a bit tricky to drill the 4 holes into the housing at this angle but it worked out fine and I could then cut the 10-32 threads into the housing with my tap set.
PXL_20201124_112801551And now re-attach the Junction Box in its new permanent location on the housing with the 4 Allen head bolts you see here in each corner of the Junction Box.
PXL_20201124_120148496The trickiest part of the reassembly was fishing the thick stiff solid copper wires back through the hole in the Junction Box and housing as they just barely have enough room to fit through and the hole is behind the Stator windings, but it all went smoothly and I soon had all 6 Stator wires and both Field Wires all back in place and ready to connect to their awaiting studs in the sides of the Junction Box
PXL_20201205_072756095One done; one to go!

But I need to wait to mount the Junction Box on the lower Big Red #2 on the side of Mr. Gee as you saw above because I need to strap it in first and THEN I can bolt the Junction Box to the housing OVER TOP of the strap.
PXL_20201204_093851598As you can see, all my trial and fit had made a bit of a mess so I needed to put back some of the Beauty into these two Beasts with a good sanding and repainting.
PXL_20201204_093900588I just happened to have this short little Jack Shaft left over from another project and in a lovely stroke of synchronicity it worked out to be the Goldilocks solution to drive Big Red #2 from the gear driven PTO on Mr. Gee.  So it needed a matching paint job as well.
PXL_20201205_064102850.MPWith all the openings and AL rotors all plugged and masked off it didn’t take me long to shoot these with three coats of Red International “Perfection” epoxy. 
PXL_20201205_072756095Although it was not the ideal shade of Red, a bit on the orangey side ….
PXL_20201205_072804595…… they definately looked better than when I started and were now all ready to be installed onto Mr. Gee. 

Hopefully Dale and all his team at Electrodyne will like what he sees too.

Now let’s quickly get onto the mounting of Big Red #2!!

I will try to mount BR#1 next week so stay tuned for more scintillating story telling then! Smile
PXL_20201209_120140437By now I was getting pretty quick at mounting BR#2 to the side of Mr. Gee and I wanted to do one final test fit of the Junction Box to double check that everything really did clear.
PXL_20201209_120133890To my absolute joy and delight everything just barely cleared!  Click to enlarge this photo or any other and you can see how close some of those fits are.
PXL_20201210_143350130If you look closely you will see that there are a LOT of close fits! 
PXL_20201210_143415830I think this must be some polar opposite of Murphey’s Law where the stars align and every close fit actually cleared!

Fortunately for me, mounting Big Red #2 on that upper flat pad you saw earlier will be a breeze compared to this one and I hope to get that done next week and will show you the results.

CHAING STOPPER:

PXL_20201207_121636753Up at the Bow on the Anchor Deck, we needed to install this latest bit of boat jewellery; our gleaming solid SS Lewmar 13mm Chain Stopper!

It is a very simple system that can become eXtremely critical if your snubber line breaks in a big storm and you need to have a way to “for sure” hold your anchor chain to the boat no matter what.  Yes, ask me how I know!
PXL_20201207_120350060Uğur and I quickly sketched up the design we thought would work best to solidly bolt this Chain Stopper to the deck framing and he had it all fabricated out of 20mm / 3/4” AL plate and was welding it to the Anchor Deck plate.
PXL_20201207_132430429Simple arched platform that elevates the Chain Stopper to be at the correct height of the chain as it comes off the gypsy chainwheel on the Maxwell VWC 4000 windlass and then the Chain Stopper is through bolted with 4 M16 SS bolts and nuts.
PXL_20201207_134200667A bit of Blue Threadlocker to make sure these never come loose but are still easy enough to unbolt if ever needed.
PXL_20201207_151922644One more “little but important” job done and checked off the list.

ELECTRICAL WORK:

PXL_20201208_074929996.MPHilmi was a welcome addition back on Team Möbius this week and he was right into the same theme of completing many more of those little but important electrical jobs.

He started with this one; putting in the connections for Mr. Gee’s two G31 FireFly Carbon Foam starter batteries.


PXL_20201208_075003433First Hilmi mounted the Red Start Battery Shut Off Switch and ran the cables from there to the Battery Box locations.
PXL_20201209_071928930Each battery will be enclosed in it’s own dedicated plastic battery box and mounted at the very far end of the Stbd/Right side wing of the Workshop underneath the Day Tank and up against the WT Bulkhead there.

They go forward another 40cm/16” from here and their lids just clear the 127mm/5” rubber exhaust hose that runs overtop of them.

PXL_20201209_071914716Now time to tame all these electrical snakes slithering out of the Engine Room!
PXL_20201209_083259750One of the best features of our decision to put in a dedicated Engine Room enclosure is that we can keep this an “Engine only” Engine Room and locate almost everything else OUTSIDE the ER where they are much cooler, easier to access, less likely to be exposed in the case of fire and much easier to comply with all the ABYC and CE fire safety requirements. 

No batteries, no electronics, no fuel filters or tanks; nothing but Mr. Gee and his immediate systems such as heat exchangers and exhaust.

What wires we do need to bring inside the ER, mostly for the Electrodyne alternators, come through this one penetration under the floor of the same Stbd wing of the Workshop on the other side of this photo.
PXL_20201209_110130702Hilmi takes it all in stride as usual and he, Ramadan and Cihan soon have the new cable trays in place ……
…… PXL_20201210_143215673and start routing and fastening the cables in place alongside …….
PXL_20201210_143228988.MP…….  and then under Mr. Gee.

Cihan does EXHAUSTING WORK!

PXL_20201202_120607019Möbius’ Engine Room was a busy place this week as Cihan and Ramadan installed the Halyard Exhaust System which has been patiently waiting its turn down on the shop floor underneath Möbius for many months now.

As you might have noticed in some of the photos above, I had already installed the flexible SS woven mesh that bolts vertically to the aft end of Mr. Gee’s exhaust manifold.

So the fist part of the “dry” section of the Halyard Exhaust components to go in was the75mm/ 3” ID vertical SS riser you see here rising up here in the lower Right corner.

The two “wings” on this riser are where the two support rods will connect down to Mr. Gee to help stabilise them.
PXL_20201202_124011317My personal favorite bit of kit from Halyard is this beautifully crafted and polished SS water injection elbow which Cihan is assembling to its silicone bellows.
PXL_20201202_124021624Peering down for an inside view, you can see how the water jets are all distributed evenly around the inner circumference and make sure there is a very even spray and mixing of the seawater that is pumped through them with the exhaust gases exiting Mr. Gee. 

This is where the exhaust changes from dry to wet and where most of the noise and the heat is removed by the mixing of the seawater and the exhaust gases.
PXL_20201202_123902462Simple job now for Cihan to slide the soaped up silicone bellows to the awaiting downward angled 127mm / 5” pipe on the Halyard “Combi” Silencer/Separator that has previously been mounted on its dedicated shelf on the front ER WT Bulkhead wall.
PXL_20201202_142018661.MPAlmost a year ago now, Yigit and I had spent several months working with Oliver and his team of engineers at Halyard HQ in the UK to design this Goldilocks Exhaust System for XPM78-01 Möbius.  Together we exchanged countless 3D models that we were each creating and so it was wonderful to see this all fall into place like an accurately cut jig saw puzzle.
PXL_20201202_142009961.MPEven Cihan, who has installed countless exhaust systems in the many other yachts he has worked on was very impressed and asked “How did you DO that??!!”
PXL_20201202_143501699With everything dry fitted and checked Cihan and Ramadan could now tighten up all the connecting bolts and SS hose clamps.

Using plenty of Tef-Gel on all threads of course!
PXL_20201203_123545070All that remained to be done was install the three rubber hoses needed to complete this Goldilocks exhaust system.  Over on the far Left side is the Black 75mm/3” ID hose that quickly takes all the seawater in the bottom of the Silencer/Separator down to the dedicated AL pipe welded into the exiting Sea Chest and out to sea.

Next over to the Right is the White hose that delivers the fresh cold seawater up to the inlet pipe on that SS mixing elbow.

And then the large 127mm/5” ID Black hose transports the now cool and quiet exhaust gases from the Combi down and over to the AL pipe welded into the Stbd ER wall where it then connects to another short length of the same rubber exhaust hose and out the similarly welded in place AL exhaust exit pipe in the hull just above the WL.

DIVINE DINETTE TABLE & PEDESTAL SYSTEM:

Last I have time to cover in this week’s Show & Tell is yet another bit of boat jewellery and Rosewood; our Dinette Table!


PXL_20201207_092001988It was love at first sight for me about 2 years ago when I first spotted this Triton Deluxe 2-stage table pedestal at the Zwaardvis booth at the big METS Marine Trade conference every year (except this one of course) in Amsterdam.

This is the fully lowered position which lowers the surface of the table to be flush with the surrounding seats where it can then become an additional Queen bed on those rare occasions when we have more quests, or more likely more Grandkids aboard than can be accommodated in the 2 beds in the Guest Cabin.
PXL_20201207_091906231Simply rotate those 2 SS handles and the air assist gas cylinder inside pushes the pedestal up to proper eating/working table height.
PXL_20201207_091915319But WAIT!  There’s MORE!

Check out that Kissin’ Cousin from Zwaardvis sitting to the side of the Triton pedestal!


Triton X-move sliderThis is the Triton T-System X-Move slider which allows you to slide the table top 200mm / 8” in the X or Y, Fore/Aft or Left/Right direction
PXL_20201207_093536309by simply pulling this lever which mounts under the table.  In the normal “fixed” position that little rectangular rubber pad on the Right is pressed up against the underside of the table and locks the table in whatever position you want.  Pulling the hand pulls the rubber down allowing you to push/pull the table wherever you want and then release the lever to lock in that position.  Brilliant!
PXL_20201208_095454023Over in the Cabinetry shop Ramadan #2, our newest Cabinetmaker has been busy building the Dinette Table top I designed.  Very simple and sturdy, it has 50mm/2” thick solid Ro$ewood edges surrounding a Rosewood laminated plywood table top.
PXL_20201208_095510680Ramadan cut this hardboard template so we could try it in place in the Dinette on the Triton pedestal and slider and check out the clearances with the table in all its different X, Y and Z positions.
PXL_20201208_095520688Once we had it just right, he was able to laminate both sides of some 20mm/ 3/4” marine plywood …..
PXL_20201208_095526367……. with Rosewood veneer in the lovely heated laminating press they have here at Naval.
PXL_20201209_081110609Mitre all the corners of the solid edging.
PXL_20201210_092310547.MPCut the biscuit joints and the glue and clamp it all ….
PXL_20201211_080236219to create a single solid table top.

All ready to have the large radii shaped into all these solid edges, sanding, filling and varnishing and I will soon be able to show you this next bit of beautiful art work aboard the good ship Möbius.
Well as usual I have much more to show you but I’m pooped, swollen and hungry as it is now after 21:00 here in Antalya on Sunday night so I’m going to call it quits for tonight and be back with much more next week.

Thanks SO much for taking time to get this far and join us on this grand adventure.  As always we REALLY appreciate you adding any and all comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below so don’t be bashful now!  Your feedback is invaluable and VERY much appreciated.

Hope to see you here again next week.

– Wayne






When you can’t Get Over it; Get UNDER It! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Nov. 10-13, 2020

As you read this week’s Progress Update below you will understand what I am referencing in this week’s title as to how we solved the most recent challenge in the building of XPM78-01 Möbius by going under rather than over the problem.  Unfortunately on Friday (did it matter that it was the 13th?)  we were hit by a much different and much more challenging problem which there is just no getting over, around or under, when several workers at Naval Yachts tested positive and there was no choice but to shut the whole company for the next 17 days and do all the contact tracing and testing of all those employees who have been in direct contact.  If all goes well Naval, and certainly Christine and I, hope to reopen on November 30th.  I’m sure you join us in wishing everyone involved the very best wishes and that there are no serious health consequences for any of us here.

To be clear and not cause any undue concern on your part, as good fortune would have it, neither Christine or myself have had any direct contact with any of these workers for the past two weeks.  Furthermore, we have always been very self disciplined with our precautions of wearing masks any time there is any possibility of being in a place with others or where others have been recently such as the elevators in our apartment.  We are both quite naturally introverts and previous single handed sailors so it has been relatively easy for us to keep to ourselves and staying as much as possible.  And we are both quite fit and healthy, especially for two sixty somethings so I am pleased to let you know that we both feel very fit, healthy and happy and are doing everything we can to stay that way.

This may be as my kids used to say “TMI Dad!!”, as in Too Much Information to share, but the value of these kinds of blogs come in large part through their openness, transparency and honesty so I felt the need to share this brief insight into what is going on here and why there will not be much progress to report on for the remainder of this month of November.  Hopefully all will go well and Naval will reopen on Nov. 30th with all of us healthy so we can hit the ground running and get Möbius finished and launched ASAP.

Now back to our regular programming as I think they used to say on radio and TV, as I do have several fun and exciting things to update you on from aboard the good ship Möbius for the week that was November10th through 13th.

I think it is quite true that laughter is the best medicine so let me start by sharing this fun cartoon, courtesy of the appropriately named Bizarrow Comics who focuses on such topics as Pirates, Cowboys, Snowmen, Doctors, well you get the idea.

Mobius Dick cartoon image This was one of their Daily Comics this past week and it must have been making the rounds on the internet as several of you sent this to us right about the same time Christine and I were both seeing it.  Thanks Matt et al!

How appropriate and fun for us right?

Getting Under Mr. Gee

Let’s move on to the reference in this week’s title to a problem that we were able to solve by going under rather than over it.  To put it in context, this was part of Hussein and I working on the alignment of the whole “propulsion” unit formed by Mr. Gee being bolted to the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox which in turn is bolted to the big 65mm / 2.6” SS prop shaft which has the big bronze 1 meter / 39.4” four bladed CPP prop on its far end.

That is a long description that is hard to track and I have received quite a few questions and comments about both the Nogva CPP (Controllable Pitch Propeller) and this whole alignment process so for those interested, let me break it down and provide more details.


Nogva CPP my simple dim hand sketch

Here is my very rough sketch from over a year ago when we were figuring out the exact dimensions for installing the aluminium Nogva Prop Log which is the “pipe” you see over on the far Left here. 
I’m hoping that this will give you the big picture view that helps to show how this Propulsion System is one solid mass from the front of the Gardner in Blue on the far Right, through the Nogva Servo Gearbox in Brown in the middle with the two flanges connecting to the Fwd/Right end of the prop shaft and over through the Prop Log, out through the end of the skeg where the CPP propeller in Green sits.

Nogva CPP prop   shaft dim dwg from NogvaHere is the dimensioned drawing from the Nogva engineers I worked with to design this custom CPP system for Möbius.  It shows how the Propeller Shaft runs inside the larger inside diameter Prop Log Tube
Nogva CPP my hand sketch This is the drawing above with some of the many dimensions I was pulling off of the actual installation at the time so I could double check that my 3D model of all this was exactly the same dimensions as the real deal.

No need for you to pay any attention to all these dimensions but I thought that this front to back view might be helpful for those trying to visualise this whole setup and see the relationships between all the individual parts.
Gardner & Nogva mounts screen shotNext up, let’s take a look at the six anti-vibration “feet” or mounts where Mr. Gee and the Nogva CPP are attached to the 25mm/1” thick engine beds running the full length of both sides of the Engine Room. 
I have never had enough time to create a full 3D model of Mr. Gee so you will have to use your imagination in the blank space to the Left of the Red Nogva Servo Gearbox, but hopefully this quick render of my Fusion 360 model will help you see how these six feet connect the whole Propulsion System to the Hull.
Front   Rear Gardner mounting brackets screen grabI initially created this 3D model when I was designing these custom brackets that bolt to Mr. Gee’ thick cast AL crankcase and create the eXtremely strong and rigid attachment points for the vertical threaded adjustment rods on each foot/mount.  Front mount is on the Left, Rear on the Right and both of these feet/mounts are the same anti-vibration models with thick rubber isolation blocks inside.
Engine isolation mounts image 1This is what those Front & Rear anti-vibration mounts look like and of course Mr. Gee requires the MMXL version!
PXL_20201112_065937889Back in the real world inside the Engine Room, this is Mr. Gee’s Front Port/Left foot after we have lifted the whole Propulsion System up with big chain hoists to drill the holes for the M16 Grade 8 bolts that will hold each mount solidly to the Engine Beds in precisely the right location Fore/Aft and Left/Right.
Nogva mounting bracket screen grabHere is a closer view of the mounting bracket I designed to be welded into the underside of the two Engine Beds and how these two different style of feet connect the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox to the Engine Beds and Hull.  Also a good shot of the output flange on the Aft end which is what need to get so precisely aligned with the matching flange on the forward end of the Prop Shaft.
Volvo Penta motor mounts photo from Yach Boat Parts dot comHere is what these highly specialised feet/mounts on the Nogva look like in the manufacturers catalogue before I purchased them.  These start out being the same as any other feet/mounts by providing the rubber isolation that separates the upper body with the threaded rod from the metal base that bolts to the Engine Beds.  However if you look closely you will see that there are also two large diameter SS pins going side to side across the Base through the elongated oval shaped rubber isolation block.
PXL_20201112_083334231Here is a bit closer view one of those two Nogva feet in my hand to try and show you those two pins and the rubber isolation block.  Why are the Nogva mounts different than Mr. Gee’s some of you have asked.  Because in addition to providing the anti-vibration connection to the Engine Beds these also deal with the very significant THRUST forces which would otherwise be trying to push/pull the whole Propulsion System fore and aft as the propeller “bites” into the water and pushes the boat forward or reverse.
The Nogva Servo Gearbox is built to be mounted solidly to a hull with no anti-vibration mounts in large commercial vessels so it also has its own thrust bearing setup inside to fully deal with all these eXtreme Thrust forces.  However with one of our first principles being Comfort, the addition of these specialised thrust feet/mounts will help eliminate the transmission of vibration and noise to the hull and make for an eXtremely smooth and quiet boat when underway.

PXL_20201112_081122230This is what the real deal looks like as we were drilling the mounting bolt holes in the Engine Beds, hence all the AL chips.

Good shot of the custom Rear brackets bolted to Mr. Gee on the Left side and the underslung bracket for the Nogva feet/mounts over on the Right.
PXL_20201112_132637277Putting it all together, this shows you the whole Port/Left side of the Propulsion System with all three mounting brackets and their feet/mounts.

But hang on a minute …………………………………………

………………………… what the heck is that underneath Mr. Gee?!?!?!?!?!?

Let’s zoom in a bit closer to find out………………
PXL_20201112_132630050Aha!  So THAT is what this week’s title is referring to about “ When you can’t get Over it; Get Under it!”. 

So what was the problem that required raising the whole Propulsion up in the air and me spending all day Thursday up close and personal with Mr. Gee’s underbelly?

Well, as Murphy’s Law would have it, when Hussein drilled those two holes for the middle two feet on the Aft end of Mr. Gee, they turned out to be right on top of a 15mm thick vertical AL stringer running down the length of each Engine Bed.  Ugh!  This meant that while the threaded ends of the mounting bolts could go through there was no space for the washers and nuts underneath!!!  Grrrrrrrrr


Front   Rear Gardner mounting brackets screen grabGoing back to this render you can see that 15mm vertical stringer underneath the Front foot/mount where it was NOT a problem as the mounting bolts are further off centerline but if you follow that stringer Aft/Right you can see how it runs right through the centerline of the two bolts in the Aft Foot/Mount on Mr. Gee and hence this problem.


The solution?  A rectangular slot was going to need to be cut into the stringer where it was welded to the underside of the Engine Bed to create enough space for the thick washers and nuts to slide into.


PXL_20201112_132632913We tried to solve this problem by going Over the Engine Beds but as you can perhaps see, there wasn’t enough room to get in there with drills, Dremel tools, chisels and files.  We could have used a plasma gun but it would have spewed molten aluminium all over the Engine Room so that was a non-starter.

*someone* was going to need to go at this problem from the UNDER side.  As you may recall from seeing Hussein in some previous posts and down below, there as simply no way HE was going to fit in there, so guess who was elected???  No recount needed by the way!


With the Propulsion System firmly blocked up on all four corners I could pull out some of my Houdini moves and slither into this space with my headlamp and use various WMD, Weapons of Mass Deletion, to cut a rectangular slot in the vertical stringer under the four bolt holes.  I was one pooped Pirate when I finally got home to my Captain at the end of the day but it worked  as planned and there was now plenty of room for the nuts and washers for the bolts for these two middle feet/mounts to thread into.  Whew!


PXL_20201112_065648729Going back in time a bit, in order to lift the whole Propulsion System up in the air so I could get underneath to cut those four slots, Hussein, Nihat and I had rigged up these two lengths of square steel tubing that Nihat had welded large D-rings to the middle underside and spanned the big hatch in the Aft Deck. 
PXL_20201112_081117099We then hooked a large chain hoist onto each D-ring and connected their bottom hooks to straps around the front end of Mr. Gee and the built in lifting eye on the Nogva.

It all worked very well and also gave us a very safe and precise way just barely to take the weight off of the six feet/mounts so we could move them in their Goldilocks Just Right locations as we fully align the two flanges which is the next step in this process.

ALIGNING the PROPULSION SYSTEM:

PXL_20201027_143240526This is the first part of the alignment challenge: get that male threaded end of the CPP Pitch Push/Pull rod coming out of the center of the Prop Shaft, PERFECTLY aligned with the female threaded Pitch Piston protruding out of the center of the output flange on the Nogva Servo Gearbox.


The prop shaft and pitch rod are fixed in position so they can’t move Up/Down or Left/Right, they both just rotate concentric with each other.  So the alignment has to happen by changing the angle of the Propulsion System.


PXL_20201027_141353695It is a slow and exacting process where we slide the feet/mounts to adjust the Left/Right position of the centre of the Nogva Pitch Piston/Flange and then adjust those big adjustment nuts on the vertical threaded rods on each of the six feet to change the angle of the Propulsion System and move the centre of the Pitch Piston/Flange Up/Down in the process.

It took several hours going back and forth from measuring and checking the Aft end here and then into the ER to tweak the six big adjustment nuts but as you can see here, we eventually hit the Goldilocks Jackpot and had the Push/Pull Pitch rod dead on center and ready to be threaded into the Pitch Piston.
PXL_20201027_150518040It was slow going turning the Pitch Piston with a wrench on those two flats so the bulb finally went on for me and I blocked the end of the wrench in position and then went outside and down to the Propeller and kept pressure pushing it forward while I rotated the bit 4 blade prop as if it were some eXtremely long bolt and that worked perfectly.
Nogva Pitch Control Rod   Flange dim dwg from Installation GuideThe last bit of precision is to get the length of that exposed threaded section of the Push/Pull rod above, to be precisely 7.5mm away from the aft end of the hex locknut as per the Nogva installation Manual you see here.  It can actually be between 5-10mm so I set it at the middle of this range at 7.5mm and torqued the locknut down to 100nm.


* for those curious, “Servo bevegelse 50mm” is Norwegian for “Servo Travel = 50mm”.  25mm on each side of “neutral” or Zero Pitch.


PXL_20201027_161424326With the Pitch Push/Pull rod all centred and locked in place I could now put on the two split halves of this Red Prop Flange and start the second phase of the alignment process.  This has two components to it; getting the mating flange surfaces precisely parallel to each other and also getting the two flanges equally perfectly aligned with each other axially. 
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualThese two figures from the Nogva installation manual shows these two alignments very clearly and as you can see it needs to be eXtremely precise, no more than 0.05mm / .002”.  FYI, this is the thickness of THIN human hair.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPThis will all be sounding very familiar if you were with me two weeks ago when Hussein and I when through the exact same process in order to find the precise location of the base of each foot/mount so we could mark out the location of the holes for their respective bolts.  This is a photo from that previous alignment and when we, hopefully, all get back to work on Nov. 30th we will do as Hussein is doing here and use thin feeler gauges to measure and ensure that the gap around the full circumference of where these two flanges mate, is exactly the same.  I.e., they are perfectly parallel.  To get there we go through the same adjustment procedure I outlined for getting the Pitch Push/Pull rod center aligned by sliding the feet Left/Right and/or turning the threaded adjustment nuts Up/Down.


I know this is not riveting stuff for almost any of you but this is such a critical part of having a smooth quiet Propulsion System that it gives me tremendous joy and satisfaction.  Fortunately it is also not a process you need to go through very often so well worth the investment in time now.

FINISHING the EXTERIOR of the ALUMINIUM HULL
PXL_20201111_132633644

Nihat was the only member of Team Möbius on hand this four day week but he is one of our most relentless workers so he finished all his work on the Port/Left side of the hull and moved around the Bow to pick up where Uğur had left off last week.


PXL_20201111_132627390You can see the multi stage process quite well in this shot.  First the welds along each butt joint of the hull plates needs to be ground flat and flush such as you see running along Fore/Aft just below Nihat’s belt line.  Then any work marks on the surface of the plate need to be ground off which leaves a finish like the one on the far Left here.
PXL_20201111_132637944This nose on shot of the Bow shows the Start/End of this whole process with Nihat just getting started on the Left side of this photo (Stbd/Right side of the hull) which is in contrast with the surface finish on the opposite side that he has fully finished with a random orbital sander.
PXL_20201111_132646829Here is a shot looking straight onto that same finished surface.  The Waterline is about 200mm/8” above the weld at the bottom so that does not get fully ground down flush as this will all be covered wtih epoxy primer and International InterSleek 1100 foul release “Bottom Paint”, so we can use filler to get all the surfaces below the Waterline flat and smooth prior to painting these surfaces.

You Made this Bed; Now Lay in it!

PXL_20201113_115814966None of our interior crew was available this week but the big memory foam mattress has been cut to size and the cover sewn up for over a month now and it was going to be much easier to get it onboard before they put in all the glass windows around the Pilot House/Super Salon so I was able to get a strapping young worker from the boat next to us helm me wrestle the mattress aboard.

As is often the case with boat beds, their sides are no parallel and this was the case with the Right side here as it runs parallel with the side walls that curve in with the hull.  But Sinan our master upholsterer was able to quick cut the foam with his special electric knife and then resew the cut edge of the very nice mattress cover so it all fits in like a glove.
PXL_20201113_115827214 It was actually much easier than I thought it might be.  This is 30cm / 12” thick memory foam so we were able to bend it and flex it just enough to get it through the Entryway WT Door into the SuperSalon and then down that spiraling stairway into the Master Cabin in the background on the Left.


Captain Christine has not been able to be onboard for over a week so it will have to now wait until after Nov. 30th for her to come test it out.

When you get out of that Bed, Test out this Helm Chair!

PXL_20201113_122333580For similar reasons I wanted to get both our big Llebroc Helm Chairs aboard before the glass company arrives next week to install all the  SuperSalon glass windows and all the plexiglass windows around the whole upper SkyBridge.


PXL_20201113_122348521This is the LLebroc Tradewinds CX HB SERIES 2 Helm Chair now resting in its new home in front of the SkyBridge Helm Station.

We also moved the slightly different and just as cool Llebroc Bandera Series 2 Helm Chair into the Super Salon Helm Station but I didn’t get a chance to take any photos so you’ll have to wait till we get back onboard for me to show you that beauty.


LUBRICANTS!

PXL_20201113_080905556It felt very good for me to be finally moving things like these Helm Chairs onboard to their final resting place as it makes the Launching of Möbius feel that much closer and real.  I had the same feeling when I was also moving these three 18 litre/5 USG cans of hydraulic steering oil onboard on Friday.  This will soon be filling up our 55L hydraulic steering oil tank that feeds our whole Kobelt steering system and I’ll show you that as it happens.


PXL_20201113_081621764

Next up were these three cans with almost 60 liters / 15 USG or one of my favorite engine oils; Shell Rimula R4X 15W-40. 
PXL_20201113_081605823In addition to being a top quality engine oil I have found this to be one of the easiest brands to find most anywhere in the world as this is also commonly specified by the big diesel engine companies for use in tractors, trucks, cranes, etc. that are needed and used most everywhere.


I also moved all our anti-freeze onboard but didn’t get any photos, which I’m sure you are all so sad about. Not!!

And that’s all from your intrepid cub reporter here in Antalya Turkey for the week that was November 10 through 13th, 2020.  Hope you enjoyed this week’s abbreviated posting and I will be back with more next week.

Please do keep your questions and comments coming by typing them into the “Join the Discussion” box below.  They are eXtremely helpful and meaningful to both Christine and myself and MUCH appreciated.  Thanks!

-Wayne

New Arrivals = Mount Up! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 02-06, 2020

New Arrivals = Mount Up! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 02-06, 2020

This will be a much shorter blog post than usual (lucky you!) as it was just a one day work week at Naval Yachts this week with them being closed from Nov. 3-10.  However, as usual there was still some very exciting new developments and new arrivals this past week that both Christine and I are anxious to share with you.  The theme this week seemed to be about “mounting” new items that have just been delivered such as mounts for pumps & alternators, mounting computers and mounting/installing glass walls and doors in the showers.  Without further drivel from me, please grab a comfy chair and a good beverage and come along for this week’s Show & Tell here in Möbius.World.

SHOWERS:  Works of Art & Engineering

I’ve been showing you for many months the progress in building the Heads and Showers in the Guest and Master Cabins and our extensive use of glass in both.  This week all these glass panels were delivered to Naval Yachts so we can finally show you what the real thing looks like although you will have to wait for another week or two to see them fully installed aboard.
03For those that are new here or don’t remember, here is a quick rendering of the Master Cabin from the perspective standing in the Entryway door looking forward towards the Bow.  Note the two glass plate walls that form the corner of the Shower in the background of this render.
01Switching locations, here is what it looks like when standing front and center in the Master Cabin looking Aft with the etched glass Shower wall corner in the foreground on the Right.
Sherry working on shower glass imagesWe are SO grateful to be surrounded by so many talented family and friends who very generously and excitedly want to apply their many talents to features inside of Möbius.  Here is one of the best examples; our dear friend Sherry Cooper in her AbFab apartment in downtown Vancouver B.C. working with us on the graphic designs to be etched into those glass corner wall panels.
shine_on_c._sherry_cooperI have known Sherry and her husband Rick since we were teaching High School together on the Canadian jet fighter base in Baden Baden Germany in 1980-84 and to say that Sherry is talented is about as big of an understatement as I know how to make.

To find out more about Sherry and see what I meant check out her other works HERE and HERE as well as her Instagram page HERE.
Christine and I worked with Sherry to describe as best we could what we wanted to achiever with these etched patterns which was things such as a marine/nautical theme, a taste of First Nation people’s art from the British Columbia area we know and love and to have all this captured in a somewhat abstract and ethereal way.

This is what Sherry came up with and we think the nailed it!  A perfect example of our favorite Goldilocks; just right, just for us type of result.
Etched Glass paterns from Sherry Cooper and Hakan vector fileThe sketches above are relatively small hand sketches and we needed to transmogrify these into much larger sizes and be in a CAD/CNC format for the etching work to be done.  Hakan, one of our former Team Möbius members took on this task and created these two Vector based files in AutoCAD which we then sent to the glass etching company.
Shower Glass Wall etchingThe etching company used these vector files to CNC cut these shapes into white peel & stick vinyl which they then attached to the two glass panels and sent us this photo on WhatsApp to make sure this was what we wanted and then they went ahead and did the etching.
PXL_20201104_113555520Here are the finished panels that were just delivered with all the other glass panels stacked on top and set onto a table below Möbius for now as they await being carried onboard to be installed.
PXL_20201104_113618020To give you a bit better idea of what these etched panels actually look like, I slid the glass stacked on top off to the side a bit to shoot this for you and give you a bit better sense of the real thing.

Thank you SO much Sherry!  We LOVE what you’ve done and we can’t wait for you and Rick to come join us and take over the Master Cabin so you can shower within your own “walls of art”.
PXL_20201028_071112613Back in the Guest Cabin we are keeping it a bit simpler with “just” a plain glass door for the Guest Shower that you can see in the stack of glass above and will also soon be installed.

Boat Computer #2


PXL_20201108_070015617We need plenty of computer muscle to power all the sophisticated navigation software, equipment, monitoring and multiple monitors we have onboard the Good Ship Möbius and so Christine has been busy researching, specifying, ordering and building our two Boat Computers.  She finished our primary PC a few months ago and this week the 2nd Boat Computer arrived from the US.
PXL_20201108_070001169This is a Kingdel fanless mini PC which Christine finally tracked down on Amazon US and had shipped over to us here in Antalya.

How fast is this new little guy?  Well, Captain Christine, who is normally an Apple Gal I might add, said “It boots up faster than you can say Windows 10”

Our newest family member will live in the overhead space above the main Entryway beside the SkyBridge helm station which is what it will primarily power.

For our fellow Geeks and Geekettes out there, below is a peek inside and the basic specs:

  • CPU: Intel 10th Generation i7-10510U, 4 Cores, 8 Threads; Comet Lake; 8MB Cache, Base Frequency: 1.8GHz; Max. Turbo Frequency: 4.9GHz.
  • 16GB DDR4 2666MHz RAM,
  • 512GB M.2 2280 SSD;
  • Intel 82574L Gigabit Ethernet LAN;
  • Dual Band 2.4/5GHz Wireless Network Card.
  • Integrated Intel UHD Graphics, 4K: HD, 4096×2304@24Hz; DP, 4096×2304@60Hz;
  • Gigabit LAN Port, HD Port, DP, 4 USB 3.0.
  • Fanless, Smart Design, Full Metal Case, Silent Working, High Speed CPU & SSD, 2 Years Warranty.
  • Pre loaded with Window 10 Pro, complete with full license key for reinstalling.

PXL_20201105_080809030


  • PXL_20201108_070153148
  • This is Christine’s temporary techno test bench in our apartment where she has both Boat Computers hooked up to load up all the software and start configuring them all.


PXL_20201108_070158096Boat Computer #1 is seen here underneath the table as it has a larger “desktop” size which provides much more space for multiple fans to keep things cool, more expansion board spaces and other advantages we wanted.  It is “only’ an i7 9th generation processor but can run all six of our big monitors and will be our main “go to” computer when we are onboard.
PXL_20201108_070115140.MPI thought this shot might give you a better perspective on the size differences although the Mini PC I am holding in the foreground appears larger than it really is due to being so much closer to you in this shot.


Synology NASFor those wondering, the black box on top is our Synology NAS or Network Access Storage.  You can slide different hard drives and SSD’s into this box and right now we “only” have two 4TB hard drives in there but easily expandable and we just took note of two Western Digital drives that are 16TB each for just $200 so we will see if we need more storage and add as we do.

We use all this storage volume on our NAS to hold everything from our huge vaults of music and movies for our onboard entertainment and on them more serious side this also holds multiple sets of electronic charts for the whole world, satellite images, all our manuals for all our onboard equipment, all our software both personal productivity software such as MS Office and all our navigation software such as TimeZero, Coastal Explorer,

Why not just keep all this in the cloud?  We do this too, but this NAS gives us direct access to everything without any internet connections at all.  So this creates what you can think of as own personal “onboard cloud”.

Mounting Jabsco Sea Water Pump
Keel cooler like on LTY

For the Gardner engine cooling, I had wanted to install a keel cooler which is made by cutting lengths of aluminium pipe in half lengthwise and welding these to the outside of the hull with U-turns on the ends to create a continuous loop.  The two In/Out ends are then welded through the hull and the engine coolant (anti-freeze + water mix) is circulated through this loop and transfers its heat out into the passing sea water.  Super efficient, no extra pumps or moving parts required and I had this on our previous boat that worked great.
Heat exchanger closed cooling sytem illustrationHowever, for a variety of reasons Naval switched to a heat exchanger style which works like this.  Sea water is drawn in through the Sea Chest and strainers by an engine driven sea water pump which then circulates the cool sea water through a variety of heat exchangers for the engine coolant, engine oil, transmission/CPP oil and finally goes to the wet exhaust to cool it and then the sea water goes out through the exiting sea chest back into the ocean.  These heat exchanger style works fine and is on thousands of boats, just more complex and more moving parts as you can see.
Bowman heat exchanger external viewAfter some research we chose to go with a Bowman heat exchanger which are one of the world’s largest heat exchanger manufacturers based in the UK and they are beautifully made bits of kit to be sure.
Heat exchanger how it works internal illustrationHere is a generic illustration showing how a heat exchanger works and it could not be more basic; cold sea water enters the large cylinder (Shell Inlet) and flows around all the smaller tubes inside picking up their heat and then exits out the other end (Shell Outlet).  The liquid to be cooled enters the Tube Inlet and runs through all the small diameter rods or tubes that are surrounded y the colder sea water and then exits out the Tube Outlet having given up most of its heat.
Bowman titanium inner tube heat exchangerThat inner “Tube Stack” as it is called is made out of Titanium in ours and you can see that it is simply a bunch of small diameter tubes which are bundled together and have liquid going into one end of each tube and then out the other.
Heat exchanger internal tubes photoI didn’t want to take our Bowman’s apart but here is a similar model that will let you see how the Tube Stack fits inside the larger diameter heat exchanger body where the sea water flows.
Heat exchanger style illustrationSorry, not the greatest quality but best I could find in a pinch here late tonight but this should show you the basic layout and how the various liquids flow through a heat exchanger system.

Jabsco 6400-1051 sea water pumpAs you can see this is all simple enough but it does require the addition of a sea water pump to pull in the sea water through the Intake Sea Chest in the Engine Room and then pump it out through all the various heat exchangers and then finally provide the sea water that is injected into the wet exhaust elbow to cool the exhaust gasses.

I chose this Jabsco 1 1/4” bronze pedestal base sea water pump as I have had these in previous boats and know them and their maintenance quite well.  I like to “go with what I know” you know!
 PXL_20201102_121900903The next bit of “complexity” is that we now need to mount this Jabsco sea water pump and figure out a way to have Mr. Gee drive it.  Cihan has his hands more than full so I have taken on building this mounting system for the Jabsco pump.
PXL_20201102_121907066The Gardner 6LXB often had sea water pumps mounted on them so there is this very solid flat “pad” up at the very front Stbd/Right side of the massive cast aluminium crankcase with three good size mounting studs so that’s where I’ve designed a mounting system to be.
PXL_20201104_133928567Here is the top mounting bracket I came up with all ready to bolt onto that “pad” in the photo above.  Not quite up to Gardner standards perhaps but I assure you it will last as long as Mr. Gee will, aka forever!
PXL_20201104_134454292Difficult to photograph for you but this is what the test fit assembled mount looks like.  The thick AL plate at the top is what is bolted to that pad you saw above which then has the tall thick vertical AL mounting bar bolted to it at the top and an L-bar bracket for the bottom support where I used three bolts on the Sump (oil pan) to hold the bottom of the mounting bar.

The Jabsco sea water pump will bolt about half way along the length of the mounting bar and will be driven by a timing belt type of rubber belt off the Gardner’s crankshaft which you can see off to the mid right side of this photo.
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Here is a different view from up above.

The big cast bronze housing is the engine oil heat exchanger which just clears the AL top plate of the upper mounting plate.

The large round cast AL item on the bottom Left with the copper tube snaking upward here is Mr. Gee’s coolant water pump that is internally driven off the camshaft.
PXL_20201104_134527744For the curious and observant of you, the large diameter black disc resting on the crankshaft is the chainwheel for Mr. Gee’s hand start cranking system which I will show you more of later.
OK, that’s it for this week folks.  Sorry it is so short and that we get a much longer work week this week and have more to show you in the next Möbius.World Progress Update Show & Tell.  Christine and I have had a VERY busy weekend and all day today (Monday) helping out two other couples who may become future new XPM owners.  One couple via a lengthy video call (thanks Andrew & Lili) and the other couple who are long time circumnavigating sailors who are here in Turkey for the winter and drove over to spend the weekend with us here in Antalya to meet the people at Naval Yachts and get a full tour of the Free Zone and Möbius.  We had a great time with Wade & Diane who have such a similar history as Christine and myself and we have just said goodbye for now as they head back to their boat which is about a 3 hour drive West along the coast to Alanya.  Great to meet up with you Wade & Diane and look forward to more such visits.

And thanks to all of YOU who chose to join us here on the Möbius.World blog every week.  We really appreciate having you along for the ride and for all your questions and comments that you write in the “Join the Discussion” box below.  Please keep them coming, we prize them highly.

-Wayne