The Captain and Mr. Gee get CRANKY! XPM78-01 Möbius Update 01-06 Feb. 2021

The Captain and Mr. Gee get CRANKY! XPM78-01 Möbius Update 01-06 Feb. 2021

Not as much progress as we would have wanted to report this week as many of Team Möbius were MIA working on other boats at Naval Yachts and also prepping one of the boats beside us for its Owner’s visit tomorrow. 

However, that didn’t stop the rest of us from making good progress and we achieved several big milestones that we are very eXcited to share with you now.  So get a good beverage and comfy chair of your choice and come along for this week’s Möbius.World Show & Tell.

The Captain & Mr. Gee Get Cranky!

PXL_20210206_140841305Several years ago, when I was answering some of Christine’s typically probing questions about why Mr. Gee our Gardner 6LXB was the Goldilocks Just Right, Just for us Choice for the main (and only) engine in XPM78-01 Möbius, Christine likes to say “You had me at Hand Cranked”. 

This is in reference to me mentioning that one of the Gardner’s many eXtremely appealing features is that they could be fitted with this Chain Hand Crank option.

As you can see, this kind of “crankiness” makes my Captain eXtremely happy which makes me eXXtremely happy! Smile
Gardner Chain   Direct Hand Starting exploded diagram

Very KISSS Keep It Simple Smart Safe as you can see with a rod running along the top of of the engine with handles at both ends with an Upper Chainwheel that transfers the crank’s rotation via a Chain down to a Lower Chainwheel keyed onto the engines crankshaft. 
Old Hand Crank model 1Michael and his team at Gardner Marine Diesel or GMD in Canterbury England were able to salvage all these parts off one of the many 6LXB’s they have in their inventory and sent them to me many months ago and I’ve been working on fitting them to Mr. Gee ever since.

You would think it would be a relatively quick and simple process to just clean and paint all these parts and install them on Mr. Gee …………………… but you’d be wrong!
NEW hand crank illustration Plate 12 Spare Parts 702.1 One problem was that Mr. Gee is one of the later models of 6LXB and it had this quite different Hand Crank with just one handle on the front of the engine and a different crankshaft and Chainwheel setup down on the new style crankshaft.
Front Hand Crank adaptorSecondly, as you can see in this shot of the front support and Upper Chainwheel I’ve mounted onto Mr. Gee, there is no room up front for the Hand Crank handle, let alone enough room for me to get in there to crank it.  So I needed to come up with a “Hybrid” Hand Crank setup that would allow me to marry the Old style with the Hand Crank Handle at the rear, to the new crankshaft end up front.

And just to put a particularly sharp point on this challenge, I also needed to drive the Jabsco Sea Water pump and one of our monster 250 Amp @24V Electrodyne alternators off the front of the crankshaft as well.

Hmmmmm

Let’s just say that the front of Mr. Gee became a very busy and challenging spot for me to sort out.


PXL_20201122_095008369When I am doing this kind of problem solving and exploration of new design ideas I have evolved to using pieces of stiff cardboard I cut up from shipping boxes to capture the critical dimensions and sketch out my rough ideas. 
PXL_20201122_095015832It is a surprisingly efficient system as I get to reuse the many cardboard boxes all our hundreds of shipments come in and the stiffness of the cardboard makes is very easy to sketch on when I’m laying under or over an engine for example with my digital Vernier calipers or tape measure in hand and recording all the critical dimensions.
Gardner Chain Wheels dim sketchesI then use Microsoft Office Lens utility on my Pixel4XL phone to digitize these sketches so I have a more permanent digital copy to keep and one I can print out if needed.

I don’t expect these to make much sense to anyone else but they work eXtremely well for me to record all these details and dimensions as I work my way through the different ways I come up with to solve a particular problem, create 3D models of them and ultimately machine or fabricate the parts I need and finally get them installed.
Gardner Front Chainwheels   timing belt pulley dim sketch colorAfter much head scratching and sketching, eventually this layout emerged as a way that I could fit both the RED Chain based Hand Crank system and the GREEN cogged timing belt system for driving the Electrodyne “Big Red #1” in the upper Right here and the Jabsco sea water pump on the far Left.

I will show you the Green cogged timing belt drive system next week and show you the Red chain based Hand Crank system now.
Crankshaft Chainwheel   cogged pulleys Fusion 360 renderWith all the dimensions and my ideas roughed out on cardboard I then move over to Autodesk Fusion 360 to create a 3D model of all these parts where I can put my ideas to the test and see if they will actually work out.  This is a quick screen grab of the model I came up with from the sketches you saw above. 
I won’t bore you with all the details but for orientation Mr. Gee is mostly off the screen on the far Right and the Red disk is the Lower Chainwheel on Mr. Gee’s Crankshaft running horizontally across the bottom of the screen.  On the front side of this is the cogged pulley driving the rubber timing belt that goes up to the cogged wheel on the Jabsco sea water pump.

*  Note: I didn’t bother to model the actual chain and sprocket teeth so you will have to imagine that being wrapped around the Red Chainwheel. 

The Green and Blue disks on either side of the Red Chainwheel are two of several flanged parts I needed to machine for my Hybrid Old/New Gardner Hand Crank system.


PXL_20210201_150213957Oh, and did I mention that the Old Gardner Hand Crank system used a different pitch of chain than the New style?

So I had GMD send me the Upper and Lower Chainwheels from the New style that would fit nicely on the New style of Crankshaft that Mr. Gee has but the third Idler Chainwheel (part #37 in the Gardner illustration up above) had to the the Old style Chain as it is part of the cast aluminium bracket that supports the Old style cranking shaft. 
FYI: Eventually I will design and machine a whole new Idler Chainwheel with the New style Chain pitch but for now I just mounted the Old Idler in my drill press and hand milled the teeth to get the New Chain to fit as you see here.


PXL_20210204_122850144This is that Blue coloured Flange I pointed out AL in the rendering of the 3D Fusion 360 model above, which was quit easy to machine on a lathe out of solid aluminium round stock and then broach the keyway through the inner hole so it will be locked into the 3/8 x 3/8” key on the front end of the Crankshaft.


PXL_20210204_122908730Now you can see how this newly machined AL Flange slides into the New style Lower Chainwheel which is now all sand blasted clean and painted Black.

All well and good but I’m sure that most of you are now asking “How the heck does this work to turn Mr. Gee’s Crankshaft Wayne? 

That’s the job of the eXtra part you see here that rotates on a pin sticking out of the Chainwheel.  This little part is the key to making the Hand Crank work and is called a “Ratcheting Pawl” part #3 in the Gardner Illustration above.
PXL_20210205_140738395I don’t have a milling machine (yet!), but to badly reuse The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, (for those of you old enough to remember) “We don’t need no stinkin’ milling machine” right?

Nothing that a bit of ingenuity and my handy dandy 45 year old drill press and shiny new vice can’t handle.  I machined a short shaft to just fit inside the hole of  AL bushing and tightened that in the vice jaws.
PXL_20210205_140824688This allowed me to slowly rotate the AL bushing into the 4 flute spiral milling cutter in my drill press so I could mill away the four recesses for the Pawl to fit into and ended up looking like this.
PXL_20210205_141628196So to Hand Crank Mr. Gee you simply reach down and rotate the Pawl counter clockwise so it engages in one of the four recesses like this.

Now when Christine turns that Hand Crank Handle on the Aft end of Mr. Gee as you see her doing in the opening photo, the Upper Chainwheel rotates the Chain CCW, which transfers that force down to the Lower Chainwheel which the Pawl has now locked to the Crankshaft and around goes Mr. Gee! 
This takes a good bit of muscle but with the compression relief levers keeping the intake valves open it isn’t too difficult to bring Mr. Gee’s massive flywheel up to speed and then you flip the compression levers back off and Mr. Gee chugs to life and begins to purrrrrr.  Doesn’t get too much more KISSS or reliable than that!

PXL_20210205_141659563Oh, and for those of you following all this, as Mr. Gee starts up you no longer need to turn the Hand Crank Handle and so the Pawl “ratchets” out of the recess back to this disengaged position such that the Chainwheel is now stationary while the AL Flange and Crankshaft spin together.
PXL_20210205_143910615To finish putting this all together, I machined a groove into the AL bushing for this spring steel circlip to fit into which keeps the Chainwheel aligned and spinning on the AL bushing.
PXL_20210206_135651951With the Lower Chainwheel assembled onto its new AL Flange, into the Engine Room I go and with a bit of TefGel 45 to help it slides just perfectly onto the keyed portion of the front end of the Crankshaft.

That modified Idler Chainwheel is in the upper Right here and it adjusts sideways in the slot you can see to the right of the Chain which you tighten down to keep the Chain Just Right Tight.
PXL_20210206_135637489Not much space in here so a bit difficult to photograph but hopefully you can now see how the whole Chain driven Hand Crank system works.
PXL_20210206_140841305And to come full circle, you now understand what put that great grin on my Beautiful Bride and Captain.

INTERIOR UPDATES:

While we were cranking away on Mr. Gee, Hilmi and Ramazan were cranking away up in the SuperSalon so let’s go see what they have been up to this past week.


PXL_20210202_125938206Ramazan has finished installing all the Ado LVT vinyl plank flooring and you may recall that Uğur, Nihat and I installed these two SS locking lift handles in the large hatch to access the Basement that is under the whole of the SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20210202_125923462.MPMost of Ramazan’s masterfully laid down flooring is covered in protective cardboard but you can see how nicely he has fit the edges around the hatch so they are barely visible.

But what’s that I see over on the far Left here?
PXL_20210201_111258391.MPAha! Our 50” Samsung 4K SmarTV has arrived and will soon be mounted on a fully adjustable mounting system that fits into the recess in the now opened hinged and slotted Rosewood door. 

But who’s that hiding behind that door?
PXL_20210201_111436078.MPOf course!  Hilmi and Christine are busy finishing up all the wiring for AC, DC, Ethernet and N2K that runs inside the large space behind the TV.
PXL_20210202_125951335This is also where our Boat Computer #1 will reside and Christine is anxious to start connecting it up and getting all our display screens up and running next week.
PXL_20210205_113903023While she waits for Hilmi to finish the wiring behind the 50” TV, Christine fired up Boat Computer #2 and started setting things up in the SkyBridge Helm Station.
PXL_20210205_085307113.MPIn the midst of all this, Sinan was back this week to start sewing up the Sunbrella covers like this one for that Upper Helm Station.  He is also making a similar cover for the Upper Helm Chair and I will show you that next week.

Boot Stripe:


PXL_20210202_095316082Not a lot of progress on the Bottom Paint this week but they did get started on the 100mm / 4” Black Boot Stripe that makes the transition between the bare aluminium hull sides and the InterSleek 1100SR silicone Foul Release bottom paint which I have marked off for the painters here.
PXL_20210203_084950069The International Epoxy primer has now been on longer than the maximum recoat time so they needed to do a light sanding so that the International Perfection Polyurethane paint will adhere well.
PXL_20210205_110308646.MPThe laser level makes is SO must faster and easier to mark out perfectly straight and level lines for the masking tape to follow.

Next week the paint crew will hopefully be on site to spray on the Black Boot Stripe and then once it is dry they can mask it off and start applying the InterSleek Foul Release Bottom Paint.  Hope to be able to show you all that next week as well.

All Donations Gratefully Received!

PXL_20210204_111609737.MPHmmmm……………..

Why is THAT truck parking beside Möbius??
PXL_20210204_111756370.MPYup!  I’ve saved two of our bigger milestones for the end of this week’s Show & Tell.  That’s a diesel fuel truck and Cihan is about to bring the very first drops of diesel fuel into our six integral fuel tanks!
PXL_20210204_115439374It took a lot of time but I think we came up with an eXtremely effective design for both the Fuel Fills and Vents on Möbius. 
PXL_20210204_115453633With the fully sealed lid removed you have ready access to these three Fill Pipes on the Starboard/Right side and a matching set on the Port/Left side.  These each connect to one of the six integral fuel tanks at the bottom of the hull with 40mm / 1 5/8” ID rubber fuel hose.
PXL_20210204_115447196Just forward of the Fuel Fills, these inverted 40mm U pipes are similarly connected by that same size rubber fuel hose to the vents on each fuel tank.  Together these both worked just perfect on this first fueling test with no foaming or “spit back”.
PXL_20210204_115412676But mistakes can and will happen so we designed these Fuel Fill stations to have a large capacity spill tanks below the Fill Pipes so that any diesel that does overflow will simply run into this spill tank and drain back into the fuel tank.  No mess, no fuss, no bother.
PXL_20210204_115422773When the Fuel Fill cover is in place it completely seals off all the Fill Tubes from the outside air and from any sea water on decks.  The Fuel Vent pipes have this slotted cover so they stay well vented and there is a drain pipe inside to remove any seawater that might make its way through the slots.
PXL_20210204_115015814.MPFor this first load of diesel, we only took on enough fuel to do all the commissioning of diesel based equipment such as the Kabola KB45 boiler, all the fuel transfer pumps, Alfa Laval fuel centrifuge, fuel polishing system and Mr. Gee of course and then enough for the first set of sea trials. 
Hence, we only took on a “measly” 2150 Liters / 567 USG out of the 14,600 Liters / 3860 USG that we will take on prior to our first passage.  However, as per the intro, all donations are still very much welcomed! Winking smile

X marks the Spot!

PXL_20210206_082334595OK, are you ready for the final milestone that Christine and I just completed yesterday? 

Does this help you guess what we are up to?
PXL_20210206_082345994Helpful hint:  It took place UP here.
PXL_20210203_073143437.MPThat’s right!  Time to apply these CNC cut vinyl letters and numbers to put the XPM78-01 markings big and bold on Möbius’ Bow.
PXL_20210206_083629682.MPAll pretty simple to do.  First mark off the top edge of the lettering with a straight edge and pencil.
PXL_20210206_084701016Give the area a good cleaning with 3M Scotch Brite pads and water, rinse well and then sponge on a coat of clean water with lots of liquid dish soap in it so you can slide the lettering as needed to get it perfectly aligned.
PXL_20210206_093916021Peel off the inside layer of the peel & stick lettering and press it onto the soapy wet hull and use your fingers and a plastic spreader to squeeze out all the water and get all the letters and numbers perfectly aligned and adhered to the hull. 
PXL_20210206_090548321.MPThen carefully peel off the outer layer and go over each letter with lots of pressure on soapy fingers and plastic scrapers taking special care to ensure that all edges are tightly bonded to the hull and there are no bubbles or wrinkles.
IMG_1067Bring in some cheap labour if you must.
PXL_20210206_094724331.MPTake your time to go over each letter and number several times.
PXL_20210206_091056342.MPThen stand back to check out the proportions and placement.

Goldilocks!!
PXL_20210206_124024008And yes, we would be delighted to be mistaken for a military/coastguard ship in the unlikely event that anyone is considering approaching us with mal intent!
PXL_20210206_124011267Now THAT is a Bow to be proud of!
And that’s a wrap for the week that was February 01-06, 2021.

Thank you all SO much for taking the time to join us here and we hope you will be back again next week.  In the interim please be sure to put your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Thanks! 

-Wayne

We’re Shafted, and that’s a GOOD Thing! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Jan 25-30, 2021

We’re Shafted, and that’s a GOOD Thing! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Jan 25-30, 2021

As Launch Date looms larger and sooner the theme of checking off all the “little Big” jobs on the punch list continues although we still have a few “Big” jobs such as painting the bottom with foul release paint which continued as well this past week so without any further ado let’s jump right in to see all those jobs both little and BIG that Team Möbius looked after this week of January 25-30, 2021.

We’re Shafted!

PXL_20201027_161439955One of the “little Big” jobs that we completed this past week is getting the propeller shaft fully aligned with the output flange on the Nogva Gearbox and hence this week’s title.

In this photo the dark Burgundy is the Aft Output end of the Nogva Gearbox and the bright Red is the flange on the propeller shaft which continues through the Tides Marine shaft seal system and out of the boat through the large AL prop shaft tube which is hidden here by the Blue Tides Marine silicone bellows hose.
Nogva CPP prop   shaft dim dwg from NogvaThis dimensioned drawing of the complete Nogva CPP or controlled Pitch Propeller, shaft, seal and flange will help orient things a bit.


PXL_20201027_161424326Here I have gone below the boat rotate the CPP prop back and forth while pushing it hard forward so that the two flanges meet.  A few months back we had spent quite a bit of time getting this alignment close as we installed the anti-vibration mounts on the Gardner and the Nogva and you read about that HERE, so now it was time for the fine and final adjustment to get these two flanges perfectly aligned.
Nogva flange alignment dimsioned sketcch from installation manualAs you may recall from previous posts the two flanges need to be eXtremely closely aligned both concentrically as per the illustration on the Left and also laterally as shown on the Right.  Maximum deviation we are allowed is up to 0.005mm / 0.002in (human hair is about 0.05mm diameter) and ideally we are going for zero.
PXL_20210129_073442895.MPNeeding such perfection I called on my Perfect Partner, aka Captain Christine to assist and although she is prone to laying down on the job (sorry, couldn’t resist) she was a huge help and made this task go much faster.
PXL_20201028_093742501.MPWe check the alignment by inserting a thin feeler gauge, which is the silver strip you see here, that is a tight sliding fit into the space between the faces of these two flanges and see what the gap is at 12, 3, 6 and 9 o’clock.  Any difference in size of the gap at these locations tells us how far it is out either horizontally at 3 & 6 o’clock or vertically at 12 and 6. 
PXL_20210129_084307980Adding to the challenge the prop shaft needs to be supported in its perfectly centered position which my red hydraulic bottle jack is looking after.
PXL_20201028_093808559Mr. Gee, our Gardner 6LXB is solidly bolted up to the Nogva Gearbox so they are essentially an eXtremely solid single unit that is supported by six anti-vibration mounts such as the Silver one you can see on the Stbd. side of the Nogva Gearbox on the far Right in this photo.  You can see the large vertical threaded part of these mounts with the large supporting hex nut on the bottom and smaller locking nut on the top. 
To align the flanges vertically I need to turn the large nuts at the very front of Mr. Gee or these back two on the Nogva, Up/Down to move the Nogva flange until the gap is zero all the way around.


PXL_20201028_093728662The process then is for me to go around the four Front/Rear mounts and turn those big nuts Up/Down while Christine moved the feeler gauges around the circumference of the flanges and called out the differences in the gap to me. 

With Christine laying down in the space behind the Aft end of the ER Enclosure overtop of the Tides Marine seal at the bottom, there wasn’t enough room to take a photo but this previous shot shows what she was doing as she reached in with the feeler gauges to check the gap and call out the differences to me.  Doing this all by myself was very time consuming so now you see what I called in the Big Boss to help out! 

It still took us almost 2 hours but in the end we got the gap down to zero such that both flanges were touching all the way around. 
PXL_20210129_084325319With these two flanges now fully aligned we could insert the 8 hardened Grade 8 bolts through both flanges and torque them down to 120NM and the alignment was done! 

White grease is TefGel 45 to prevent any corrosion and ensure that these nuts are just as easy to undo after many years on the job when we need to remove the prop shaft or the Nogva/Gardner for some reason in the distant future.
Tides Marine SureSeal illustrationMany of these “little Big” jobs are like dominos in that as getting one done lets you do the next.  So with the flanges aligned and mounts all torqued down I could now finish installing the Tides Marine SureSeal system. This is an eXtremely critical bit of kit as this is responsible for keeping the prop shaft cutlass bearing lubricated with a flow of fresh sea water AND keeping that sea water OUT of the boat!
PXL_20210129_124430339Here is what the real deal looks like now fully installed.  The Blue silicone “Articulating hose” in the illustration above, is double clamped onto the Stern or Prop Shaft Tube at the bottom and onto the Black SureSeal housing at the top. 

The way this works is that inside the SureSeal are two stationary rubber lip seals with the 65mm OD Prop Shaft rotating inside them that keeps the water sea water inside the Prop Shaft Tube from being able to get past and into the boat. 

We keep a VERY close eye on that Blue silicone hose over the years as if it were to ever rupture we would have an eXtremely large volume of water flooding into the boat!

FYI,
The Black ring at the top is the very handy holder for a second set of replacement lip seals which you can change out with the boat still in the water as you don’t have to remove the Prop Shaft to replace them; just pry the old ones forward, cut them off and slide the new ones into place.


PXL_20210129_124446081Last part of installing the SureSeal system is to provide a pressurized flow of fresh sea water into the Prop Shaft Tube which travels down the tube and lubricates the Cutlass bearing which supports the Prop Shaft as it exits the boat.

One of the reasons I chose to locate the Silver Heat Exchanger you see in the Upper Right was to be able to tap into its drain plug on the salt water side and use this as the source of pressurized salt water for the SureSeal.  Nice short hose run and Cihan had that all hooked up in no time.  The second Red hose on the Left goes up along the Aft wall of the ER with a ball valve on the end of it so that I can check the salt water flow rate when we first start up and from time to time afterwards and ensure that there is at least 4L/min / 1USG/min when the engine is idling.
PXL_20210129_124414968.MPBoth those little Big jobs checked off the list and this is what the finished result looks like when peering down into the space Christine has now vacated on the outside of the Aft wall of the ER.  Silver Gardner Coolant Heat Exchanger bottom right, Tides Marine SureSeal middle Left and Red Prop Flange middle Right and the Red Nogva Gearbox Oil Heat Exchanger at the top.

To keep the ER air tight a 6mm AL plate is bolted with a gasket over top and covered wtih the same composite grid floor plates as the rest of the Workshop and ER.
Heat Exchangers labelledCihan checked off another Big little job by plumbing the Sea Water and Engine Coolant water lines up at the forward Starboard/Right corner of Mr. Gee and the ER.  It is pretty busy up there so I’ve labelled some of this plumbing to help you make sense of it.  Can be a bit confusing as there are three fluids running around here; Sea Water that comes in via the Sea Chest just visible on the far middle Right here and through the Strainer and Manifold on its way to the Jabsco Impeller Pump and then out of that Pump and into the Engine Oil Heat Exchanger where it runs Aft exiting out and into that Silver Sea Water Heat Exchanger you saw up above in the SureSeal installation sequence.

Hope you got all that because YES children that WILL be on the Test on Friday!

Driving Big Red #2

Electrodyne #2 jack shaft labelledOver on the opposite Port/Left side of Mr. Gee I finally have the drive system for our second Electrodyne 250Ah @ 24V alternator all designed and the adapters all machined so time to get them all installed.  You may recall this photo from THIS previous blog post about installing what I call Big Red #2 and how I intended to drive it from the PTO or Power Take Off on the Gardner using a Jack Shaft I had from a previous job.
Jackshaft renderThis is a quick screen shot from my Fusion 360 design for the adapters at either end of the Red JackShaft.  Green cylinder on the far Left is the Output shaft from the Gardner PTO, Purple is the AL adaptor to couple the Jackshaft to the PTO and at the far Right in Gold is the steel multi V-belt drive pulley that came with the Electrodyne which I will machine with four threaded holes to bolt the other end of the Red Jackshaft to. 


Note: Jackshaft simplified here to just a rod with flanges at either end.


PXL_20210130_125654649This is the PTO from the Gardner with that Purple aluminium adaptor in the rendering above now pushed onto the Green PTO Output shaft and secured with four round hex head through bolts. 

The Red Flange on the front U-joint end of the JackShaft barely visible on the Right will bolt to that AL adaptor with four more M6 SS bolts.
PXL_20210130_125702007This is the Aft end of the JackShaft where this U-joint will be similarly bolted to that steel 8V pulley on Big Red #2.
PXL_20210130_125713105The day came to an end at this point yesterday so not quite finished but this shot will show you how the whole JackShaft will connect the power from the PTO back to Big Red #2.  This monster Electrodyne alternator could absorb as much as 10HP at full 250 amps of output which the gear driven PTO can put out easily and this Cardan or Jack Shaft should be more than up to the task.

Stay tuned for more though folks on the final installation of Big Red #2 next week AND just wait till you see the sweet setup I’ve come up with to drive Big Red #1 using a cogged timing belt setup that is now almost done.

Well Sand My Bottom!

PXL_20210125_083618470Also not quite done but work continued this past week on getting the bottom underwater portion of the hull all primed and filled in preparation for applying the silicone based Foul Release paint, International InterSleek 1100SR.

The Paint Crew finished applying all the epoxy filler to smooth out all the welds and create a sleek smooth surface for the InterSleek 1000SR Foul Release top coat to come.

You can see some of the filled welds around the Prop Tunnel above and
PXL_20210125_113912527….. the filleted edges around the AL threaded mounting disk for the Zinc on the Rudder.  The circle on the Right is the filled in through hole we put in the Rudder to make it possible to remove the Prop Shaft without having to drop the Rudder.  Because we hope to not need to remove the Prop Shaft for many years this hole is filled in to provide a fully flush curved surface on the Rudder sides to maximize a smooth laminar flow of water over the Rudder.
PXL_20210125_113934869.MPSanding the first coat of epoxy filler on the Keel and Prop Tunnel into smooth large radius coves.
PXL_20210126_114206167….. and the Aft Depth Sounder transducer.
PXL_20210126_114219496….  and one of the 5 Sea Chests.
PXL_20210126_114321477By end of the week they had the last of the 5 coats of International epoxy primer rolled as you can see around the Bow Thruster Tunnel, another smaller Sea Chest intake and Zinc mounting disk up near the bow.
PXL_20210126_114402759Final coat of epoxy primer being rolled on Aft and we’ll see the application of the InterSleek 1100SR next week.

Grand Dame of Dyneema!

PXL_20210129_144503223.MPLest you should think that The Captain only lays down on the job, this will prove that she sometimes sits! 
PXL_20210129_144634649But Christine has become and expert Dyneema splicer after doing so many as she installs  all the Lifelines around the Main Deck.  This are the AL Stanchions with their Lifelines now in place on the Aft end of the Port/Left side.  The Tender will come On/Off this side so these 3 LifeLines have Pelican Hooks that are easy to release so we can then pull up the Stanchions and roll up the whole setup and stow when the Tender is aboard.
PXL_20210129_144622216Closer view of how these Pelican Hooks and Thimbles work.
PXL_20210129_144628144You start to appreciate how Christine’s Dyneema splicing expertise has developed so quickly when you start to count up all the splices required for each LifeLine in the system we’ve come up with.  On the far Right is an endless loop that wraps around the AL Stanchion through a small AL D-ring to keep it in place and a SS Thimble captured on the end.  Last step of this will be to lash the loop around the SS Thimble closed so that when it is undone the Thimble can’t come out.


Tylaska Dyneema AL rings donutsLooking down the LifeLines to the Left you can see another splice at the Left end of the Pelican Hook and then further Aft/Left two more around these Black anodized Donuts or Rings you can see further to the Left.  Christine leaves a gap of about 80-100mm / 3-4” between these two rings and then wraps multiple lashings between them to tension the life lines.  And of course each of these Rings require yet another splice!

INTERIOR UPDATES:

PXL_20210125_091302262.MPHilmi and Ramazan continued their work inside Möbius this past week and we also find more of Captain Christine’s fingerprints up here at the Main Helm where she and Hilmi have been working to install and connect Boat Computer #1 you see here on the Port/Left side of the Main Helm Chair.
PXL_20210125_091330861Its ultimate home will be inside this space behind the 50” Monitor on the outside and this AC/Heating Air Handler inside.
PXL_20210125_091339930This space is normally covered by this hinged Rosewood back with a recess for the adjustable mounting system for the 50” monitor that doubles as both our movie watching entertainment screen when on anchor and then one of 4 screens for boat data and navigation when underway.
PXL_20210126_075505032Down in the Guest Cabin Ramazan is completing the last of the Ado LVT vinyl plank flooring. 
PXL_20210126_075450320.MPWhile the smallest by surface area it has ELEVEN removeable sections above the bolt on tank access hatches below so this area is taking the most time.

Pull out Bed in the Upper Left and Christine’s Office desk on the Right.
PXL_20210127_110131943.MPSix of those removable floor sections all weighted down while the adhesive dries.
PXL_20210126_153010788.MPRemovable floor sections?

What removable floor sections?
PXL_20210129_095901473Ramzan then stepped up his game (sorry) by moving up to install the vinyl flooring on the steps leading up from the SuperSalon to the Aft Deck. 

Another tricky and time consuming bit of detail as each step has one of these handrail posts he needs to go around.
PXL_20210129_095827835Which, as you can see, he had no trouble doing eXtremely well!
And that’s a wrap for the week that was January 25-30, 2021.  Yikes!  The first month of 2021 gone already??? 

Well at least it puts us another week closer to LAUNCH so as with “being shafted” that is all a very good thing.

Thanks for joining us for yet another episode here at Möbius.World.  REALLY appreciate and value you doing so and please feel encouraged to add your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

Hope to see you here again next week.

-Wayne


Mr. Gee is Cagey & Exhausting Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius Jan 11-15, 2021

Mr. Gee is Cagey & Exhausting Progress Update XPM78-01 Möbius Jan 11-15, 2021

Another busy week for Team Möbius as we all focus on getting her finished and ready for her Splash Day first kiss with the sea, which we are now counting in weeks rather than months or years, so exciting times here at Naval Yachts to be sure.  As is often the case near the end of an eXtremely big project and certainly at the end of Project Goldilocks, most of the work is on all those “small jobs” chasing down all the loose ends from previous work installing all the systems, cabinetry, propulsion, etc.  And as most of you would know from your work on projects it is the last 5% of a job that seems to often take 50% of the time!  However, good progress is being made and I will take you on a whirlwind tour through all the little things that got done this week which add up to be an eXtremely BIG deal as it gets us another week closer to Launch Date.

So strap yourself in and hang on for this week’s Show & Tell tour of the Good Ship Möbius for the week that was January 11-15, 2021.

HELMS:

Llebroc Upper Helm ChairYou may recall from reading previous posts that we have been very busy finishing off lots of those “little jobs” to complete the Upper and Lower Helm Stations and that continued this week. 

This is the Llebroc Tradewinds CX High Back helm chair that will be our perch when piloting Möbius from the Upper SkyBridge Helm and Nihat and Uğur got that all mounted and through bolted this past week.
PXL_20210111_133056567We needed to wait until the TreadMaster had all be glued down to all the aluminium floors in the SkyBridge and then we could mark out the exact location of the 6 through bolts for the base of the pedestal.
PXL_20210111_152910361.MPDirectly below this Upper Helm Chair base is this area above the Galley so Nihat removed the 50mm/2”  EPDM insulation foam to expose the area where the supporting plates and through bolts would go.


FastMount standard ClipThis is a good example of why all the panels on the ceilings and many on the walls are made to be easily removable by using FastMount clips which are the White dots you can clearly see against the Black ceiling framing in the photo above.  Being able to remove any panel in a few seconds is an eXtreme time saver for such jobs.
PXL_20210111_152902953There can be a tremendous amount of force exerted on that base when a good sized adult is perched way up on top of the Helm Chair in rough seas so Nihat & Uğur installed some 20mm AL plate on the underside of the AL floor plates and then ran the through bolts from the pedestal base to sandwich the whole assembly and create an eXtremely solid pedestal for this Upper Helm Chair.
PXL_20210111_152922589.MPAs is so often the case with these “little” jobs, all the time and work is in the preparation and the actual installation goes very quickly.  So once they had all the prep work done with the support plates and drilling the holes it didn’t take them long to torque down these six 316SS C’sunk bolts and the Upper Helm Pedestal was all done and ready for the adjustable base plate and slider of the chair to fit over the top of the AL piston you see here.  This piston has a powerful gas lift cylinder inside that makes it easy to raise/lower the Helm Chair about 30cm/12”.
PXL_20210111_133149816In front of the Upper Helm Chair, this custom made Switch Panel for all our external lights finally arrived and fit like a glove in the opening below the Standard Horizon GX600 VHF-AIS.
PXL_20210111_102538061Hilmi had already installed all the wires so it did not take him long to get all these switches wired up.  We tested out all the lights and everything worked just as planned.
PXL_20210111_064947231Such as these Green Navigation Lights that Hilmi is checking out here on the Starboard/Right side of the SkyBridge coaming.
PXL_20210111_065005679Red Nav Light on the Port side working just as well.

BTW, a fun way to remember the Red/Green orientation is “There’s no Red Port Left”  (thanks for the correction Max!)

TreadMaster on these side decks is all ready to be glued down which they also completed this past week.

PXL_20210111_133120077Christine and I installed the two 24” touch monitors as you saw last week and there are a few more “little jobs” need to be looked after but this Upper Helm Station is nearing completion now which has been great to see.
PXL_20210111_133406608Similar story down below at the Main Helm where we also installed the two 19” touch monitors last week and this Helm is now also getting close to finished.
PXL_20201123_080219974.MPThis is the Llebroc Bandera Series 2 Helm Chair which, similar to the Upper Helm Chair, needs to have its pedestal mounted and through bolted in the floor.
PXL_20210112_093059795We needed to wait until Ramazan had finished installing all the Ado LVT vinyl flooring and then layout the location of the solid block floor that had been installed here for the through bolts to go through the 50mm/2” thick insulated and heated floor. 

Drilling and installing these through bolts is a bit tricky due to all the cable trays filled with electrical cables running underneath this floor in the Basement, but we lowered the cable trays and drilled all the holes with no problem after lots of careful measurement.

This is where we left off on Friday so Uğur and Nihat will pick up here when we all get to work Monday morning.
PXL_20210112_093041739Just behind the Main Helm Chair we had to do the same kind of layout and prep for through bolting this Zwaardvis Triton Deluxe adjustable pedestal for the Dinette Table.
PXL_20210112_093055787In addition to the Up/Down adjustment of the pedestal itself you can see here how the Zwaardvis T-System XY slider bolts on top and allows us to move the table fore/aft and left/right by 200mm/8” which enables us to put the Rosewood table in the Goldilocks just right position for eating/working, lounging of made down into a bed.  The little Black unit on top will be fastened to the underside of the table and you just pull that Black lever and the cable releases the “brake” while you slide the table in the XY axis you want and then release to lock the table in place. 

Very KISSS – Keep It Simple Smart & Safe!
PXL_20210111_153157483.MPBy Friday Faruk, Orkan and Ali had finished up the remaining “little jobs” with the TreadMaster non-slip surfaces.  Both Side Decks and the front platform in front of the hinged Solar Panel bank is now all completed.
PXL_20210111_153121429.MPAs is this small area around the Lewmar EST65 Warping/Kedging winch.

OTHER ELECTRICAL JOBS

PXL_20210111_153126683Our head Sparkie Hilmi had a busy week as well. 

He installed the Black Foot Switch for the Warping/Kedging winch above, so one more little job checked off the punch list.
PXL_20210111_102527822Finished wiring up all the components in the Upper Helm Station.  Kobelt WalkAbout remote control box in the upper Left corner, Nogva CPP clutch controls below it and Horn, Engine Stop & Start buttons on the bottom.

Std Horizon GX6000 VHF-AIS top center with the External Light Switch panel below which we saw earlier.
PXL_20210111_133142729.MPRight of the VHF is the Vetus Bow Thruster joystick and the Furuno NAVPilot 711C below it.  Maxwell anchor windlass control upper Right with Kobelt 7170 Jog Lever below.  Round gauge on far upper Right is the Pitch angle of the CPP propeller and hiding under the plastic is the Kobelt 6501 electronic control head for the Gardner Throttle and Nogva CPP Pitch adjustment levers.
PXL_20210113_111533388Looking through the WT door off the Aft Deck and peering into the dark space above as you walk through into the SuperSalon, you might be able to make out the neat little alcove up above that Hilmi and Christine worked on this past week.
PXL_20210113_111509509Here is a closer view with the upholstered panel removed to show the components installed in this well protected space.  Far Left is the Axis M7104 Video Encoder that puts our non IP cameras onto the network,
PXL_20210113_111516129In the middle is one of several Planet Industrial 10/100TX Ethernet switches and the incredible Kingdel i9 9th gen mini computer that Christine put together to be our Boat Computer #2.

HOUSE BATTERY BANKS

PXL_20210115_130946525Yesterday (Friday 15th) Hilmi and I spent some time down in the Basement working to finish off the installation of the 24 FireFly Carbon Foam batteries which make up our 1800Ah 24V House Battery.
PXL_20210115_131014986.MPHilmi has all 24 batteries wired up in their 6S4P configuration where six 4V batteries are wired in Series to create four 24V @ 450Ah banks which in turn are wired in Parallel to create a single 24V @ 1800Ah House Battery which gives us a total capacity of 45kWh to power all the AC and DC circuits onboard.  While we can safely take these Carbon Foam batteries down to 20$ SOC State of Charge, we will typically not take them below about 50% SOC so as to maximize their cycle lifespan and still give us up to 900Ah or 21.6kWh to keep us safely and fully powered up at all times.
PXL_20210115_132643694Before we look after the last step of organizing and supporting all the cables, Hilmi, Ramazan and I worked on this very KISSS way of holding each of the 24 4Volt cells in solidly in place under all conditions.  Each 4V cell/battery weighs 43kg/95lbs and by wedging each battery in place using these composite foam pieces you see in these photos.
PXL_20210115_132707875Right beside Möbius, Naval is building a big fancy 20m catamaran out of very high tech composite materials and this foam board was all left over “scraps” that caught my curiosity so I tested out some samples and this stuff is awemazing! 

It is literally light as a feather and I can beat it with a sledge hammer and not put a dent in it!  I’ve tried soaking it in water, vinegar and acetone with no absorption or other affects so I had an Aha! moment and thought this was the Goldilocks solution for a KISSS battery hold down system you see here.
PXL_20210115_132654215Along the sides, while difficult to see here, a two stepped piece of composite foam snuggly wedges in place between the sides of each pair of batteries and the aluminium tank sides and the thicker upper stepped part holds the batteries down by the ledge along the outer edge of each battery case.
PXL_20210115_132650957Down the middle a T shaped piece of composite foam is wedged into the 40mm/1.6” air gap where the sides of the batteries meet.  If you look closely (click to enlarge any photo) at the foam piece on the far Left, you can see how the T cut out fits on top of the ledge on the Blue plastic battery case.  When the AL plate lids are bolted on top this will squeeze the batteries tight against the AL floor down at the 25mm ‘’/ 1’ thick Keel Bar

I’ll be back next week to show you how we have organized and tied down all these big 25mm2 / 4/0 cables and then bolt on the 6mm AL cover plates with gaskets to seal the whole battery compartment which is then vented with thermostatically controlled fans to keep the batteries cool and well vented.

LIFELINES!

PXL_20210114_133143233Christine has been working onboard Möbius every day for the past few weeks now and took on one of the larger jobs remaining; installing all our Dyneema Lifelines.  I’m not sure if she is holding on out of pride of her work here on the Aft Deck or to help keep her tired little body upright after a grueling week.

We are using Dyneema for all our lines and rigging as it just SO superior to standard lines and Stainless Steel twisted wire being stronger, safer, kinder to the hands, easy to inspect and monitor.  Christine is going to do a separate blog post here with all the details so I will leave you to read that when it goes up in a few days.


Being as pleased and proud of her as I am though, can’t resist just a few photos of her handiwork to whet your appetite for more.


PXL_20210113_114221872Simple eye splice where each Lifeline begins with this “Luggage Tag” style attachment to the 40mm/1.6” thick walled AL stanchion posts.
PXL_20210114_133300285The top Lifeline is 90cm / 36” above the deck and the bottom one is a custom Goldilocks Just Right height to help keep our stubby legged Barney the Yorkshire Terror onboard.
PXL_20210113_114244534Where the Dyneema Lifelines simply pass through a Stanchion these short lengths of 10mm / 3/8” AL pipe have been welded at the height of each of the 3 Lifelines.
PXL_20210114_133209301For Lifelines that we need to remove regularly, she splices a Pelican Hook on the other end with a simple endless loop around the end gate stanchion pipe.
PXL_20210114_133228050Along the length of each Lifeline, to provide adjustment and re-tensioning over time, Christine has spliced on two Black aluminium “donuts” and then lashed between the two with smaller diameter Dyneema.  This one is just temporary while we are testing out the layout but will give you an idea how this system works.

SuperSalon is Floored!

PXL_20210111_064335000Ramazan has quickly become a Master at installing the Ado LVT vinyl flooring we are covering all the floors in all three living compartments on Möbius.  For orientation of this photo I am standing about where the Main Helm chair is looking Aft at the stairs leading up to the Aft Deck.  Ramazan has about half of the Ado LVT vinyl planks installed on the Right side in front of the two door style 130L Fridges in the back and 2 70 liter drawer freezers in the foreground.  The bare plywood rectangular piece on Ramazan’s Left is the hinged hatch that lifts up to access the stairs down into the Basement under the whole SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20210111_064306051.MPHere is what it looks like from the opposite end, standing in that WT door off the Aft Deck looking forward to the Main Helm at the front of the SuperSalon.  Galley is partially visible on the far Right.
PXL_20210113_111549426.MPA few hours later and that Basement Hatch is almost fully covered and Ramazan did a fabulous job having it blend in almost invisibly to the rest of the floor.
PXL_20210112_125857110Main Helm and Dinette Table floors all laid down and I’ve started to lay out the locations for the pedestal bases of the Helm Chair and the Dinette pedestals.
PXL_20210112_125852600Flooring all done in the Galley now.
PXL_20210114_124241646With the LVT flooring all done in the Master Cabin and the SuperSalon, Ramazan transferred his attention to the Corridor and Guest Cabin area which will likely the the most time consuming as there are 10 tank access ports he needs to lay the flooring around.

Here in the Corridor that connects the stairs up at the top of the photo coming down from the SuperSalon, to the WT door into the Workshop which is where I’m standing to take this photo.  He pulled up the temporary plywood covering that has been covering this area so he could level off the tops of the Blue rigid foam board for the final marine plywood to go on next.  Easy to see how PEX tubing for the In-Floor heating is snaking through the foam and the aluminium tape helps reflect the heat upward through the plywood.
PXL_20210115_105407266.MPPlywood is now screwed in place to the wood frames underneath and Ramazan has started to lay down the Ado LVT vinyl planks.

Stay tuned for next week’s episode where he will likely finish off all the vinyl flooring.

Mr. Gee gets Cagey!


Mr. Gee cage   exhaust support modelYou may recall from last week’s Progress Update that I had designed this pipe rail or cage setup attached to the four motor mounts I had designed months ago and work continued on this week.
PXL_20210105_132404350Here is where we left off last Weekly Update with the front and rear rails or “staples” that Uğur and Nihat had installed.
PXL_20210111_063820393On Monday, Uğur and Nihat finished off the “cage” by bolting on the two lengthwise tie rods to complete this very rigid cage around Mr. Gee.  As with so many elements on Möbius this serves multiple purposes, one is to provide a safety element when we are doing our hourly engine room checks on a passage and a sudden lurch in the boat’s movement might cause you to loose your balance and reach out to grab one of the hot or moving parts of Mr. Gee.  Now this “cage” provides you with a safe cool hand hold all the way around.


PXL_20210111_063824172.MPSecond purpose of this pipe cage is to provide the frame for the four support rods that need to go up to support the dry stack components of the Halyard exhaust system.  These four “ears” or tabs have been welded on to provide the lower attachment point for those four SS support rods.
PXL_20210114_134024345Cihan and Mesut fabricated four of these SS support rods in no time by welding some SS slugs into the end of each SS pipe and threading it for the Heim joints that would go in each end.
PXL_20210114_134033887I am just test fitting the Heim joints here so the SS lock nuts are not yet in place but you can see how this simple setup creates a Goldilocks support rod that is of course all very KISSS Keep it Simple Smart & Strong.
PXL_20210115_101831712Here is what it looked like as we shut down yesterday.  Next week Cihan will install the front two supports but already the exhaust dry stack is eXtremely solid and I can barely make it move when I grab it and shake it for all I’m worth.
PXL_20210114_150011125Two other important “little” jobs Cihan and I worked on this past week were the mounting of the Morse cables to the Nogva CPP Pitch lever and the throttle lever on Mr. Gee, and the solenoid for the shutoff lever on Mr. Gee. 

I whipped up this little sketch on my new favorite drawing board; cardboard!  No work of art and rather embarrassing for a former Draughting/Drafting instructor but it works well to outline my basic ideas and communicate them with Cihan with no problems given my poor Turkish language skills.


PXL_20210114_143123672I just love working with Cihan and everyone on Team Möbius because it is such a collaborative relationship.  I did that initial sketch you see above and discuss the key parameters with Cihan and ask him to run with it and build whatever he thinks will work best and is easiest for him to build.  This is the modified design he came up with and fabricated in minutes out of some 10mm / 3/8” aluminium plate.
PXL_20210115_101941176The purplish colored Morse cable on top here transfers the mechanical movement from the Kobelt electronic Actuator box up above on the ER wall down to thee throttle lever on Mr. Gee to change his RPM and then the 24V solenoid underneath moves the engine shut off lever below.

A similar Morse cable comes down from the other side of the Kobelt Actuator to move the Pitch control lever on the Nogva CPP Servo Reduction gearbox but I failed to get some photos of that.
PXL_20210115_101947000Her is a better angle of the finished result of the Throttle cable on top and the Shut off solenoid below. 

  • Two more jobs checked off the list!
    PXL_20210115_101923504Another prime example of how these “little” jobs take a BIG amount of time was finishing off this very busy area around Mr. Gee’s oil filter.  The bronze block on the Left has four fittings in it, the top one I’ve installed one of the two direct oil pressure gauges and then the Black line below it takes the pressurized oil directly to the valves in the cylinder head.  The bottom two outlets I have just plugged off for now but will soon have an oil pressure alarm sensor installed.
    PXL_20210115_101848653On the Right side of the big cast Oil Filter canister is the Black oil pressure adjustment valve and then that beautiful bronze oil temperature thermometer and a 2nd oil pressure gauge on the far Right.  The reason for two oil pressure gauges is that the one on the Right measures the oil pressure when it is highest coming directly out of the oil pump inside the crankcase whereas the one on the far Left measures the oil pressure at the far end of the line just before it gets pumped back into the crankcase.  This setup allows me to instantly see the difference from start to finish of the oil pressure to the engine and enables me to quickly spot any problem long before it advances.
  • There are also digital equivalents in the form of temperature and pressure sensors that will put this data onto our N2K network where I can log it by the minute and have a full history of all these metrics being logged every second of every day.


And that’s a wrap for the week of January 11-15, 2021 people!  Thanks so much for getting through yet another one of Wayne’s rambling Weekly Progress Updates and in spite of my pathetically long response time to them, PLEASE do add your questions and comments in the “Join the Discussion” box below.

I hope to see you again next week.

-Wayne

There will be NO Slip Sliding Away on Möbius!  XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Progress Update Jan 4-8, 2021

There will be NO Slip Sliding Away on Möbius! XPM78-01 Möbius Weekly Progress Update Jan 4-8, 2021

And 2021 is off to rapid start as the first week of the year has already whipped by me in a flash.  Very busy times here as we all push to finish XPM78-01 Möbius and get her in the water by the new target Launch Date of February 12th!  Which BTW, is now only 33 calendar days and 25 working days from now.  Yikes!!

However, as we all learn over time, deadlines are good things to help us keep our eyes on the prize and get things done so as to ensure that there is no “Slip-Sliding Away” of our Launch Date!  Therefore, I am going to stick with using this fixed Launch Date to help keep the positive pressure on all of us on Team Möbius to “get ‘er done” and as my 4 year old granddaughter Blair says (with gusto!) “Let’s DO this!”

I’ll take that advise to heart with my introduction to this Weekly Progress Update and jump right into this week’s Show & Tell of what all happened aboard the Good Ship Möbius this past week of Jan 4-8, 2021

Non-Stick on the Bottom:


PXL_20210104_121016219

Continuing the very rewarding trend of late of hitting lots of different milestones of this build, work began this week on preparing the bottom of the hull for its foul release bottom paint.  First step was to clear out all the equipment and materials which had been accumulating underneath the hull on the shop floor.
PXL_20210104_121024683.MPIt helps to have a forklift of course so it didn’t take too long to move everything elsewhere at Naval Yachts and have a clear floor space under Möbius to work on.
PXL_20210105_064646565Next up was to get rid of the short little hull support posts and replace them with these longer steel tubes that connect just under the Rub Rails and slope down to the floor where they are secured into the concrete with long lag bolts.

You’ll note too that the upper part of the hull sides have now been covered in plastic to keep their freshly sanded surfaces clean.
PXL_20210104_111758312.MPThe two newest members of Team Möbius, Ali kneeling on the Right and Mehmet standing on the Left, get to work grinding down the welds below the waterline and removing the layer  of Aluminium Oxide Al2O3that has formed since these hull plates were first welded in place over two years ago. The automatic and rapid formation of Al2O3 is one of the big benefits of building hulls from Aluminium as it is a very had and durable protective layer that prevents any further oxidization or corrosion.  However Al2O3 is equally good at “protecting” the hull from paint, which is part of the reason why we are leaving all the exposed aluminium on Möbius unpainted. The one exception is below the waterline where we need to prevent marine growth from forming as this creates a lot of drag on the hull as it slides through the water.
PXL_20210105_072426269.MPSo you need to remove all the Al2O3 before the first coat of epoxy primer goes on.  This is the first round of removing the Al2O3 and then just before the first coat of primer is sprayed on, they will give it a light sanding with orbital sanders and a wipe down with Acetone to make sure the AL surfaces are completely clean and oxide free so the primer will bond well
PXL_20210105_074437093

The only item below the waterline that does not get painted is the big 1m OD beautiful Bronze Nogva CPP propeller, though later on, it too will get some special treatment to prevent fouling as even the slightest bit of grown or roughness on a propeller blade causes severe reduction in transferring power from the prop to the water.
PXL_20210105_074446979The special tube we cut through the Rudder can now be be filled in so Uğur tacked this elliptical AL plate to block off the hole for now.  Whenever we might need to pull out the prop shaft, this hole allows me to do so without having to remove the Rudder which can add a lot of time to the prop shaft Re & Re.  This will get covered with some epoxy filler and sanded flush with the surface of the Rudder plates as a super slippery Rudder also helps a lot to increase the efficiency of the Rudder and Steering overall.
PXL_20210104_132711290Another important part of the preparation for the bottom paint is taking off the upper edge of the “Boot Stripe” at the very top to make the transition from the bottom paint to the unpainted aluminium above.  This is made SO much easier now that we have laser levels to use rather than the laborious process of measuring every few feet as I’ve had to do in the past to establish what you hope is a level straight line.  In keeping with the “lean & mean” exterior esthetic, the Boot Stripe and the bottom paint will both be Black but the Boot Stripe will be glossy Black Polyurethane whereas the Bottom Paint will be the matt finish of the silicone based International InterSleek 1100SR


For those not so familiar with bottom paints, most boats use an Anti-Fouling type of paint which prevents micro organisms from growing on it by having various biocide chemicals such as copper, tin and now more modern toxins which try to prevent growth from forming.  This has been done for centuries with many old wooden boats having their bottoms sheathed with sheets of thin copper.
PXL_20210104_132630120Looking nice and straight to me!

Anti-Foul type bottom paint doesn’t last too long, 6 months to 2 years max, before it either wears off or looses all its anti fouling chemicals and you have to haul out, remove all the old and paint on new coats which is neither quick nor inexpensive, to say nothing of the environmental concerns.
PXL_20210104_132658391.MPInstead of “Anti” foul we are going to use international InterSleek 1100SR which is a Foul RELEASE type of solution which in the simplest terms is a coating of silicone fluoropolymer which is akin to the non-stick coating such as Teflon on frying pans.  When I was a young boy I was struck by the idea of “Better Living Through Chemistry” and my daughter Lia is an Organic Chemist so this more modern and much more effective different kind of chemistry that creates Foul Release paint was a no-brainer for me.
PXL_20210104_132600948.MPA little kick up at the stern end of the bottom paint to add a bit of flair!

When moving, nothing sticks to the hull but when we sit at anchor for weeks or months at a time, grown will still form on our InterSleek bottom BUT it all comes off with a simple wipe with a cloth or sponge so the amount of time and effort it will take us to “dive the bottom” and clean the hull will be drastically reduced from our previous boats even though Möbius has a much larger bottom surface.
PXL_20210105_121710267[3]Uğur looked after one more bit of preparation for the bottom painting by sculpting the Exhaust Exit pipe which is not far above the waterline and below the top of the Black Boot Stripe so it too will be painted.

PXL_20210105_121658997I will talk more about the Foul Release and InterSleek1100 paint as we start applying it in the coming weeks, so to finish up for now let me just add that Foul Release type bottom paints and InterSleek are not well known by most boat owners but it has been the norm for large commercial and military ships since the 90’s.  Based on their experience the InterSleek1100 should last for around 5 to 7+  years, so we are eXtremely anxious to see how it performs for us on Möbius.  Stay tuned for the next couple of years to find out! Winking smile

Non-Slip up on Top:

PXL_20210107_073546864.MPJust as important as keeping our bottom Non-Stick to prevent growth, we need to keep all our decks and floors up on top to be very Non-Skid to prevent us from slipping when walking around, often in bare wet feet and a energetically moving boat.

For all our decks and other exterior AL surfaces we are using what we think is the ultimate Non-Slip material called TreadMaster which has the tag line “The Original Anti Slip Deck Covering” which has lasted for more than 20 years for many of our friends. 

In previous weekly updates you’ve seen the Team covering all the Main Decks and stairs with Treadmaster and this week the finished off the last remaining items such as these AL stairs from the Aft Deck down into the Workshop.
PXL_20210107_073556384We will leave all the “Slip Sliding Away” to Simon & Garfunkel while we stay put safe with our feel solidly in place on our TreadMaster and that composite grid flooring down in the Workshop and ER thanks very much!
PXL_20210108_142941793We left what could be the most dangerous or at least slip-prone deck for last; these narrow slopped Side Decks that flank the SkyBridge.  Orkan was able to use all the left over TreadMaster from doing the Main Decks to cut out all these smaller “tiles” of TreadMaster to cover these Side Decks and here he has them all cut out and flipped over upside down ready for the AL Side Decks to be sanded and cleaned.
PXL_20210108_151342777Faruk and Ali could now get busy mixing up the West Systems epoxy adhesive and gluing each piece of TreadMaster into its final positions on the Side Deck surfaces and squeezing out the epoxy to every edge with the HD roller you see here in the foreground.
PXL_20210104_150729359

And in the words of Jean-Louis, Voilà c’est fini!!

TreadMaster is now all done and one more milestone achieved.  Well done Team Möbius!!

Much ADO about Non-Slip Inside Too!

PXL_20201231_064414784Last week you may recall seeing Ramazan finish installing the ADO vinyl LVT flooring in the Master Cabin and he has that now all finished.
PXL_20201231_064536530Keeping ourselves safe at sea requires that ALL our floors are very Non-Slippery and as you can perhaps make out in this photo, we chose these Ado LVT vinyl floor planks in large part due to the highly textured nature they have that is similar to old well worn woodgrain on patio or pool decks.
PXL_20210105_153101626His final job to finish the Master Cabin was the two stairs leading up to the Port/Left side of the bed and the removable access lid beside the Shower.  These are the only vinyl flooring that is glued down, the rest is all “floating” so it can expand and contract in different temperatures.  Here is is using some very heavy weights to keep these pieces flat and squished onto the underlying marine plywood while the adhesive dries overnight.
PXL_20210107_074118757Master Cabin flooring all finished, Ramazan moved onward and upward to the SuperSalon and moved everything off the floors in there and gave all the plywood base a thorough vacuuming and cleanup.
PXL_20210106_105852531First task for the SuperSalon floor was to install the wood framing and rigid insulation on the large hinged hatch that provides access down into the cavernous Basement that lies below the AL floor of the whole SuperSalon.
PXL_20210107_074041873After checking that each plywood floor panel was solidly screwed down, Ramazan stared to do his layout for the floor planks.
PXL_20210107_074157941Starting with this reference line for laying down each row of planks perfectly parallel to the centerline of the boat.
PXL_20210107_113745764.MPClick – Click, assemble one row of planks.

Click – Click, lock that row into the previous one laid down.


PXL_20210108_143021368.MPRinse and Repeat, with lots of careful scribing and fitting around all the radiused Rosewood toe kicks surrounding all the cabinetry.

Screens, Screens and more Screens!


PXL_20210106_095311058Winding back the clock by a few days, another eXtremely big milestone for Christine and I happened this week and this photo should give plenty of clues as to what this was.

Can you guess what we are up to here?
PXL_20210106_095319924Hint.

It has something to do with these two unfilled spaces front and center at the Main Helm.
PXL_20210106_095328531That’s right!  Time to unbox and install all our beautiful big, sunlight readable, touch screen LiteMax helm monitors; two 19” here in the Main Helm and then two more 24” up on the SkyBridge Helm and then on each side of the Main Helm will be another 43” monitor on the Right and a 50” TV/Monitor on the Left.

After a LOT of research and some help from a fellow passage maker, Peter Hayden over on “Adventures of Tanglewood”  we finally tracked down the OEM manufacturer of most marine MFD’s and monitors and bought all five Helm monitors from LiteMax in New Taipei City, Taiwan. 
PXL_20210106_100430158The two 19” Main Helm monitors are LiteMax NavPixel Marine model NPD1968 and this link will give you all the technical details for those wishing to know more.  The specs that mattered most to us are that these are fully sunlight readable with 1600 nits (a good phone screen is about 300 nits), AOT touch, high shock & vibration resistance, IP65 waterproof and can be powered from 9-36V DC.
PXL_20210106_100538201Both monitors slide into this hinged plate above the Main Helm dashboard and allow us to tilt these monitors however we wish to have the best line of sight and least reflection.  Captain Christine is peeling off the protective plastic layer to check out the non-reflective screens below.
PXL_20210106_100646072Another feature we value highly is that these monitors have physical and easy to reach control knobs and buttons.  Always frustrating to try to figure out how to increase the brightness as daylight arrives and you’ve had the screens turned down close to black for night time viewing.
PXL_20210106_102735742Didn’t take us long to get the two 19” monitors mounted into the Main Helm and so we moved up to the SkyBridge where these two openings on the Upper Helm Station were begging to be filled.
PXL_20210106_111325846.MPFirst we removed the rear AL panel to give us access to the inside so we could tighten down the very well done mounting screw setup on these monitors.

We also put in a layer of thin EPDM foam rubber to fully seal each monitor into the AL Helm Station.
PXL_20210106_104706261.MPThey fit into their openings like a glove and as you can see the big opening we had designed into this AL Helm Station provided easy access all around each monitor to secure them tightly against each frame.
PXL_20210106_104713877These 24” monitors are LiteMax NavPixel model NPD2425 with similar specs as the one’s down below.  Plenty of connection port choices on the back including the power terminals on the far Left which will be connected to our 24V DC system and then via DVI-D to our onboard boat computers.
PXL_20210106_104643455As you might see reflected in the plastic protective covers, I took this shot with my camera at eye height when you are sitting in the SkyBridge Helm Chair so this will give you a good sense of the perspective you’ll have when conning the boat from up here with great visibility of the entire Bow and Anchor Deck up front.
IMG_0974When I wasn’t looking Captain Christine snapped this shot of me finishing up the installation under her watchful eye.

We are eXtremely excited to get these bad boys all powered up and connected to our boat computers but that will have to wait until next week so stay tuned for that.

POWER!

PXL_20210105_070759362Speaking of powering things up, whenever Mr. Gee is running we have up to 24kW of power from the two Electrodyne 250A @28V alternators he is spinning down in the Engine Room.  Here is a peek at the cabling that Hilmi completed this week which takes the AC output from the stator windings directly to the externally mounted Electrodyne Rectifiers over on the far Right side of the Workshop.
PXL_20210105_140040082.MPEach of these Electrodyne beautiful brutes has two individual alternators inside and so there are six cables coming out of each alternator to carry the 3 phase AC current.  So Hilmi  put his hydraulic lug press to good use crimping all 12 lugs onto each cable.
PXL_20210105_141320446That shot up above is of Big Red #2 which is driven by the PTO off the bottom Left of Mr. Gee which you can see a wee bit of in the very bottom Right of this photo.

On the Upper Left here, this is Big Red #1 which is mounted up above on this 40mm/ 1 5/8” AL plate I fabricated and bolted onto the pad on Mr. Gee’s cast aluminium crankcase just for this purpose.  This will be driven by a cogged “timing belt” setup which I am busy fabricating right now and I will show you more of next week.

Here though you can see the other six cables coming out of the Junction Box atop Big Red #1 on their way over and out of the ER to connect to the Rectifiers that are staying nice and cool out in the Workshop.

Mr. Gee Gets Cagey

Those with eXtremely sharp eyes and memory might notice a new addition to Mr. Gee this week?


Mr. Gee cage   exhaust support modelKeeping with our KISS or Keep It Simple Safe & Smart approach, I designed a dual purpose AL pipe “cage” to wrap around Mr. Gee to provide solid hand holds whenever you are near him while he’s running.  This then also creates the perfect base for the four support rods that go from the pipes of this cage up to the exhaust dry stack system up above which I will show you more of next week.

PXL_20210104_080045592I pulled off the 2D drawings from my Fusion 360 3D mode above, sent them over to Uğur on WhatsApp and he and Nihat got busy transforming these 2D drawings into 40mm AL pipe reality down on the shop floor.
PXL_20210104_080051729Same technique you’ve seen us use before, Uğur and Nihat create these large radius bends by cutting a series of slots on the inside of the curve in the 40mm thick wall AL pipe, bends them and then tacks them in place.
PXL_20210104_111702902.MPWe then test fit them in place on Mr. Gee and once tweaked into just the right fit Uğur welds the slots closed.
PXL_20210104_111706646As you might notice on the model rendering above, each “staple” shaped rail will be bolted to AL plates that span the motor mounts we fabricated here at Naval.
PXL_20210104_132736071.MP

Uğur could now weld on the 20mm / 3/4” thick base plates and weld all the bend slots closed.
PXL_20210105_064707202Nihat picks up with his angle grinder and quickly cleans up all the welds to create smooth soft curves.
PXL_20210105_132358340That gives Uğur time to go back into the ER and drill and tap all the threaded holes in the Engine Mount plates so the finished staples can be bolted in place.

Uğur and Nihat were only available Monday and Tuesday this week so this is where they left off and will pick up again tomorrow (Monday) morning to bolt in the longitudinal pipes and start fabricating the support rods that attach to the four AL tabs you can see they have now welded to the tops of each stable rails and will connect to the SS dry stack exhaust pipes you can see here.

We’ve Been Hosed!

PXL_20210104_081956996.MPOur eXtremely productive plumber Cihan was also with us for Monday and Tuesday and he made great progress plumbing in a lot of hoses and other items so let’s check that out.
PXL_20210104_081940739This is outside the Aft Stbd/Right corner of the Engine Room Enclosure with the plate removed that covers the far end where the prop shaft enters the ER and connects to the Nogva CPP Servo Reduction Gearbox via the Blue (purple looking here) dripless Tides Marine shaft seal. 
PXL_20210104_081947563.MPUp above and off to the far Right side of the prop shaft, you can just see the silver coloured AL heat exchanger with the bronze elbow which is what Cihan is now plumbing with this white hose.

This is the heat exchanger that cools down the fresh water/antifreeze mix that circulates through the inside of Mr. Gee and that is what this white hose carries to/from Mr. Gee and the heat exchanger.

If you look at the black composite end plate on this heat exchanger you can see that Cihan has already connected the hose that carries the cool sea water from the Sea Chest in the ER.
PXL_20210104_082003577Inside the ER on the Right side of Mr. Gee you can now see where two of the white sea hoses connect to Mr. Gee.  The top hose in this photo will carry fresh water coolant from the integrated water pump on Mr. Gee and the bottom hose carries sea water out of the long Bronze Engine Oil Heat Exchanger back to the Coolant Heat exchanger we saw in the  photos above.
PXL_20210105_131800135My apologies for not having time to draw up some better illustrations to explain how these heat exchangers all interconnect but for now this photo will show you two of the pumps in this system.  The round aluminium pump in the center of the photo above is the integral Garner centrifugal water pump which pumps fresh water/antifreeze coolant back from that silver AL heat exchanger we saw earlier.


PXL_20210105_131741168 The Bronze Jabsco pump on the Right is one that I am in the process of mounting and it is the impeller pump that pulls sea water from the ER Supply Sea Chest into the “IN” labelled port and then out of this pump into that bronze elbow with the Blue painters tape up above.  This sea water then runs the length of that Bronze Engine Oil Heat Exchanger bolted to the side of Mr. Gee and exits via the white hose you can see two photos up from here and goes down to that silver AL heat exchanger we saw at the beginning. 

The longer white hose in this photo carries Mr. Gee’s fresh coolant back to that silver AL Heat Exchanger.

Clear as mud to most of you and a pathetic job by this former mechanics teacher but best I can do for now folks.
PXL_20210105_071052003The other new addition this past week was Cihan’s installation of this Blue Beauty which is the big “sand” filter which removes most of the sea critters and debris from the salt water supply for the Delfin 200L/min watermaker.

This is not found in most boats and are normally used in large swimming pool installations, but I long ago discovered that these are the “secret” to extending the life of the other two sea water filters on the watermaker last for months rather than weeks.  This filter is filled with a special kind of sand known as Zeolite and it is the first line of defense to filter out the sea water being pumped out of the Sea Chest into the watermaker.
PXL_20210105_071100105There is a six way valve on top which you use to change between running the seat water through the filter and back flushing it in reverse once in a while to fully clean out all the debris that has been collected by the Zeolite sand.  Simple, easy and eXtremely effective.
PXL_20210105_071146113Super simple in design and to use and plumb with just three ports:  Top Right SS hose barb is where sea water is pumped into the filter by the low pressure high volume 24V pump connected to the Sea Chest.  Bottom Right is where the cleaned sea water exits and is pumped over to the two standard filters behind the watermaker.  Far Left with the SS elbow is where the dirty back flushed water exits and goes out the exiting sea chest in the ER.
PXL_20210105_144625975In the background on the wall behind the white watermaker housing on the bottom Right, you can see the three other WM filters; the pair on the Left are the Primary/Secondary sea water filters and the one off to the Right is a carbon filter to remove any harmful chemicals in the fresh water you use for back flushing the WM at the end of a run.
As usual of late I’ve got more photos to show you than I have time and dinner is once again waiting with my eXtremely patient and beautiful Bride on this Sunday evening so I’m going to call this a wrap for now and do my best to cover more next week.

Thanks for joining me on this first posting of 2021 and I hope it helps in some small way to get your new year off to a good start.  How about if YOU start your New Year off by adding your comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below?  They are all true gifts to me and much appreciated!

See you next week.

-Wayne




Bye Bye 2020; Hello 2021 We are clearly floored! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Dec. 28-31, 2020

Bye Bye 2020; Hello 2021 We are clearly floored! XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update Dec. 28-31, 2020

Though I continue to shake my head in disbelief,  it does indeed appear (on Jan 2nd as I write this)  that this tumultuous and challenging year that was 2020 is rapidly ending and 2021 just as rapidly beginning. Actually, it is now Jan 2nd as I am writing this so as usual, Wayne is way behind!

As with many of you I suspect, seeing the end of 2020 is somewhat welcome as we look to put most of the severely challenging aspects we experienced in 2020 behind us.  However being the “terminal optimist” I am, my observation would be that the end of 2020 is all the more welcomed with exponentially increasing trend lines of positive progress that is happening around us as 2020 winds down.  This progress is both in the most important and macro view of the truly awemazing progress that has been made with more and more effective vaccines and testing for Covid-19 as well as in my much more micro perspective of finishing and launching XPM78-01 Möbius.  I think most of you might agree that ending the year with positive progress rapidly rising is certainly a welcome change from when it was all going the other direction,

One of the words I would personally chose to describe 2020 is “accelerant”.  My brilliant and beautiful daughter Lia is a very successful chemist and one of the many things I learned through her is that, as Wikipedia words it

Accelerants are substances that can bond, mix or disturb another substance and cause an increase in the speed of a natural, or artificial chemical process. Accelerants play a major role in chemistry—most chemical reactions can be hastened with an accelerant.

My point here being that I think that as we put 2020 in the rear view mirror and perhaps provides us with the 20/20 or better “vision” that hindsight most often does, we will see that 2020 was very much an accelerant for trends that were already happening prior to the beginning of 2020 and increased the speed and rate of change of these trends which were BOTH, positive and negative.While making sure to attention to and learn from those negative trends  I chose to focus on the positive trends which have been equally or great accelerated by the events of 2020 and which I will try to further in 2021 and beyond. 

Very selfishly, those trends include the accelerated rate at which Christine and I hope to finish the building of Möbius and start a whole new trend which we can also accelerate, that of returning to our life at sea as full time liveaboards as we pick up where we left of in “wandering, pondering and wondering the world one nautical smile at a time.”  You can be the judge of how well we do at this if you chose to continue to follow our adventures here on the Möbius.World blog as we make the transition from building to cruising.  Wish us luck, we’re going to need it!

OK, after yet another “brevity challenged” opening, let’s get to what you really came here for;  this week’s Progress Update Show & Tell for the 3.5 day week of December 28-31, 2020.  New Years is a VERY big deal here in Turkey and so everyone on Team Möbius and Naval Yachts was very anxious to finish up at 13:00 on Thursday and get the New Years festivities started.  It all worked out very well on the calendar as well as this gave all of us a 3.5 day weekend to celebrate the end of 2020 and ring in 2021.  As in many parts of the world there was no shortage of fireworks for Christine and I to enjoy from our 9th story apartment here in Antalya as we toasted this dual closing and opening of windows in our world.  We hope that however and wherever you were for New Year’s Eve 2020 that you too were able to celebrate this annual transition and that 2021 will turn out to be one of if not the best year we have ever had.

Why is Wayne Floored?

PXL_20201230_064314702Two very good reasons this last week of 2020 has me so floored and this is the first; Uğur and Nihat installed the grated floors in the Engine Room surrounding Mr. Gee!  This is the same very cool composite floor grating that you’ve seen us installing for the floors in the Forepeak and the Workshop.  eXtremely rigid, impervious to all chemicals, easy see-through to the bilge spaces below, easy to install and lift out when needed.
PXL_20201228_152119866Very simple aluminium L-bar framing to support these floor grates which Nihat and Uğur have perfected now and weld up in a jiffy.  This is the frame for the raised floor at the Aft end of the ER.
PXL_20201228_092247916.MPBy raising the floor here about  200mm/8” above the two side level floors flanking Mr. Gee, we were able to make this all one level floor across the whole width of the ER.
PXL_20201228_141405395In addition to the Safety factor when moving about in the ER during our hourly ER checks on passages and when I’m working in there, the grating also protects the hoses, solenoids, dipstick, etc. on the Nogva CPP Servo Gearbox and the two heat exchangers on either side of it.
PXL_20201230_063915903Then we dropped the two side floors down to be about 50mm/2” above the tank tops so as to give me the maximum amount of space on either side of Mr. Gee when I’m servicing and working on him.  This Port/Left side is the service side of the Gardner 6LXB where the majority of components are such as the fuel injection system, dipstick, on engine fuel & oil filters, throttle lever, etc. so it is wider and longer and relatively clear of other obstructions other than the sea water exit manifold that connects to the exiting Sea Chest in the top Left corner.
PXL_20201230_063920585.MPPurposely a bit busier on the opposite Starboard/Right side where the dual sea water intake strainers and the sea water supply manifold live and connect to the Supply Sea Chest partially visible in the upper Right corner here behind the 127mm/5” ID exhaust hose as it exits the ER and runs under the Day Tank to exit out the side of the hull.

The red hose is now ready for Cihan to install on the side of Mr. Gee where it will transport the engine coolant (water + antifreeze) out of the ER and through a heat exchanger loop inside the Webasto IsoTherm Calorifier/water heater tank where it gives up some of its heat to our DHW Domestic Hot Water system and reduces the need for the Kabola KB45 diesel boiler to provide our DHW whenever Mr. Gee is running.
PXL_20201230_063859528.MPI am very happy with the way this has all turned out and how much it adds to our priorities of Safety, Comfort and Low Maintenance inside the ER.  In the next week or so Uğur and Nihat will be fabricating and installing the Exhaust System supports which will add even more safety to working in here and I’m already excited about showing you that.

Master Cabin is Floored!

And what is the second reason I ended the year being so floored?

PXL_20201228_084920099.PORTRAITHmmm, it sure doesn’t look that it has to do with increasing the comfort of the big bed in the Master Cabin?


PXL_20201228_084916783.PORTRAITOh wait!  This is where Ramazan has put all the planks of LVT vinyl flooring for the past 2 days so that little ceramic heater in the upper right corner can bring the temperature of everything up 20+ degrees C / 68F where Ado, the manufacturer, recommends for installation.
PXL_20201228_141559667These LVT planks are installed as a “floating floor” so no adhesive is used so that the vinyl can expand and contract a bit without causing any buckling or warping.  As we will be taking Möbius through the full spectrum of temperatures from the poles of Antarctica and the Arctic down to the tropical heat on the Equator, we need to account for these kinds of conditions.


PXL_20201231_064552368Each plank “click locks” to the next plank on both sides and ends so the installation is relatively easy but quite time consuming on a boat where there are almost no square corners or parallel lines and so all the planks at the ends and sides of each room must all be carefully and accurately custom cut and fit.

Here is a good example of that where Ramazan had to carefully cut the LVT flooring to fit just right around this area just inside the door on the full height wardrobe as you enter the Master Cabin.
PXL_20201228_141607446Ramazan started by laying out the Centerline of the hull and using that to provide the lengthwise reference line for laying down all the LVT planks.  Then he worked from there putting down the LVT planks parallel to this Centerline and cutting the edges to fit just right up against the Rosewood wall panels.
PXL_20201230_064146447The blank plywood rectangle under the vacuum is one of the many places on the Master and Guest Cabin floors that need to be removable to allow you to get at the access ports to the water and fuel tanks below all the floors.  This one in the Master Cabin is the largest of all because it spans the corners of four individual water tanks which we located here for that reason.
PXL_20201231_064414784Hey!  I would have sworn that there used to be a removable access panel here?!?

Ramazan is quite the flooring expert having apparently laid down a lot of this LVT flooring and you can see this on display here where he has been able to make the joint where the ends of the LVT blanks butt together with almost no gap at all.


Double lifting suction cup toolOn the rare occasions when we need to remove these sections of the floor to inspect or clean out a fuel or water tank, we simply use one of my favorite tools, an industrial suction cup like this which you’ve seen us using to install the big 26mm thick laminated glass panels round the Pilot House a few weeks ago.
PYI Floor Anchor DetailsWe won’t get to installing these until a bit later but in anticipation of the inevitable questions about what happens to these removable floor panels in the unlikely event of a full roll over (lets hope!), we will be installing these SS floor anchors.  I’ve used these floor anchors from PYI before on previous boats and they not only work eXtremely well, they are more bits of kit on my “boat jewelry” list for being so beautifully designed and built.
PXL_20201231_064501056Flooring pretty much all done in the Master Cabin and here is a full length shot of the floor alongside the bed leading to the stairs up to the SuperSalon.

We are eXtremely pleased with how all the various colours, materials and textures have all come together.  Not bad for two very inexperienced interior designers don’t you think?

And the indirect dimmable LED string lighting really helps to not only increase the Safety factor throughout but also really uses the Silver/White colour we chose for these LVT planks to maximum advantage in reflecting and diffusing that light across the floors and around the edges.
PXL_20201231_064511045What better way to show you the flooring than by getting down on floor level?  Best I could do to try and show you the texture of these LVT planks which works eXtremely well as a non-skid surface even with bare wet feet.

BTW, the LED strip lights are just being test fit right now and will soon be installed into their grooves with some clear silicone to keep them fully hidden and well secured.

Fitting out Mr. Gee

PXL_20201231_092009785Cihan was able to return for two days this past week and he is always a treat for me to work with and is super productive.  Remember those red hoses that connect Mr. Gee’s hot water to the Calorifier you saw in the ER in the Flooring section above?  Cihan now has them all connected and starting to insulate them to keep the heat in the water and out of the ER.
PXL_20201231_091908765This is the front Stbd/Right side of Mr. Gee and we are tapping into his AL coolant manifold up on top of the cylinder head to return the coolant from the Calorifier.
PXL_20201231_091959338We then tapped into what was a drain plug fitting in this lower coolant manifold where the water comes out of Mr. Gee’s side mounted centrifugal water pump.
PXL_20201231_093903582Over on the opposite Port/Left front corner of Mr. Gee, Cihan now has the diesel fuel return line hose connected now.
PXL_20201222_152215524With Cihan being so busy on other jobs at Naval I’ve been busy lending a hand by fabricating some of the mounts he needs to complete jobs such as mounting one of the big Electrodyne 24V 250A  alternators on that same upper left corner of Mr. Gee you see in the photo above.


PXL_20201222_152230392KISS right?  Some 20mm/ 3/4” thick AL plate gives the neccessary strength and rigidity to support this hefty alternators that tip the scales at 33kg/73lbs each.  Ask me how I know?!
PXL_20201222_104857883Once I had the two plates all drilled for the four mounting studs on Mr. Gee and had worked out the precise location of the alternator so that its serpentine belt pulley would be aligned and on the same plane as the other three pulleys I could drill and tap this 40mm/1.6” thick mounting block.
PXL_20201230_113719726After test fitting this on the Electrodyne alternator the mounting block needed a bit of trimming to fully clear the body of the alternator when bolted in place but nothing that my super handy Milwaukee angle grinder could make short work of.
PXL_20201222_153045213Here is the final result with Big Red #1 now fully fitted onto Mr. Gee. 

I’ve lost track of how many times I had to lift all 33kg of this beautiful red beast up and down to get these mounts all worked out but I’m thankful for the workout that helps me keep my girlish figure I guess! Smile

Also pleased with the way this mount will work out position wise to give me good access for future maintenance and with being rock solid to carry on the Gardner tradition that Mr. Gee demands.
PXL_20201222_153052827[4]For those wondering, the six terminal studs on the sides of the junction boxes on each Electrodyne are where the AC current comes out of the two “Siamese twin” alternators inside each Electrodyne and then carry that 3 phase AC current over to the external Rectifiers mounted outside the ER over on the Stbd/Right side of the Workshop. 
PXL_20201222_153026382That AC current will be carried by those 12 Red cables, 6 from each Electrodyne, that you can see coiled up to the Right of the alternator and in some of the photos in the ER Flooring section above. 

Next up for me is to work on getting all the cogged belt pulleys mounted and aligned but that will have to wait till next week.

I Can See CLEARLY NOW!

PXL_20201125_143726657.MPSaving the “Clearly” part of this week’s title for this last part of our Show & Tell this week as this is another one of those big milestone events in the build for Christine and me.  It actually all started more than a month ago when this photo was taken.  Do you see the clues as to what this is all about?
PXL_20201125_143924192.MPDoes this closeup help you guess?
PXL_20201125_120008079.MPCorrect!  This was when the acrylic team from Hakan Glass was onboard back in November to build the hardboard templates for each of the 15 removable acrylic windows that will allow us to make the whole SkyBridge weatherproof!
PXL_20201129_115124003Let me backup a bit and show you the design that I worked out with the guys at Hakan Glass.  This test sample they made will help me show you how it all works. 

Four basic components …………………… 
PXL_20201129_1152268231.  The clear 8mm / 3/8” thick cast acrylic sheet that forms the tough windows.  Cast acrylic is more heat and scratch resistant than common Plexiglass which is usually extruded.  Acrylic has a tensile strength >10,000 lbs/sq inch and an impact resistance about 17 times greater than ordinary glass and under high impact, (cyclones anyone?)  it won’t shatter and if it does break it fractures into large, dull-edged pieces.

Acrylic is also eXtremely clear, half the weight of glass and resistant to most chemicals.

Clear, Safe, weatherproof, not easily scratched.

Low Maintenance – Check image
PXL_20201129_1152092642.  Aluminium anodized U-channel extrusions for the track frames that hold the acrylic sheets in place.  Note that the U-channel on the Left has its upper side cut down to be half as high as the regular one on the Right as that is key to how this system works as I’ll explain in a minute.

Being anodized AL these U-channel extrusions are easy to keep clean and never oxidise. 

Low Maintenance – Check image
 PXL_20201223_1055357053.  Black EPDM rubber edge molding that keeps the sheets tightly in their frames so they don’t rattle or move.

Simple, Secure & Quiet 

imageComfort – Check


PXL_20201129_1154504784.  To add some Secret Sauce to the mix let’s stir in two strips of these silicone magnetic seals that are typically used on glass shower doors.

Simple to use, Clear, Long lasting & Weathertight.

imageComfort + Low Maintenance – Check


PXL_20201129_115332914Now let’s put it all together to see the solution we’ve cooked up for Möbius’ SkyBridge.

Remember how we cut off half of the height of one side of the lower U-channel? That’s what you are seeing here.  With half the height of the inside wall of the bottom U-channel, you can push the acrylic sheet all the way up into the full sized upper U-channel which allows you to now push the bottom edge of the acrylic panel into the U-channel and then push it down and presto, you’re done!
My inspiration for this design comes from something most of you would likely know from putting bug screens in and out of the outside windows in your home.  You know the ones where you remove them by pushing the frame of the bug screen up into the top U-channel in the window frame and then pull the bottom out of the lower U-channel which it now clears. 

There is always great elegance to me in simplicity.


PXL_20201129_115614198PXL_20201129_115615688But what about where two acrylic sheets need to butt together on the long side stretches of the SkyBridge you ask? 

Aha!  Simple, just press a length of these silicone shower door strips onto each edge and their internal magnets snap the gap shut.
PXL_20201223_080352298Last step, with each acrylic panel installed just press the Black EPDM rubber edge molding firmly into the small space between the inside edge of the AL U-channel to lock the acrylic tightly in place.

PXL_20201129_115749566et voilà! 


PXL_20201225_092829292.MPYou’ve can now clearly see those beautiful views all around you from this premium vantage point high above the water while all the wind and rain stay outside and you are completely dry and comfy inside.
Wait …………………. What’s that you say?  You are now in the tropics and it is hot and humid?  You want those high up beautiful views more than ever but you also want some good breezes and fresh air? 

No problem.  Möbius has you covered.  Just lift out as many of those acrylic window panels as you’d like because every one of them is removable!
Double lifting suction cup tool  But how would you remove them you ask?

Ahhh, remember out little friend from the previous section on how we lift out the removable floor panels?  Yup, that same little fella works even better to grab onto those sleek smooth acrylic panels and quick lift up and out comes the panel to be stowed away while all those fresh tropical breezes flow through and keep you cool and smiling.

Well, you get the idea.


OK, now let me quickly flash through what the process looked as the talented boys from Hakan Glass cooked up this recipe of 4 simple ingredients I had put together:

PXL_20201113_122015789Start by cutting some of these 3m/10’ lengths of anodized AL U-channel in a table saw to take off 1/2 the height of the one edge for the bottom and some of the side frames.
PXL_20201123_071104967Glue the U-channel pieces to the tops and bottoms of the AL framed openings of the SkyBridge and its roof using clear industrial epoxy adhesive.
PXL_20201124_142542680.MPOnce all the lengths of U-channel have been affixed, tape off the joints where the U-Chanel joins with the frames of the SkyBridge on the inside and outside ….
PXL_20201124_142624795 ……. then apply a small cove of black Sikaflex 296 to completely seal these joints and add a nice visual accent to these edges.
PXL_20201125_115922255.MPCut and fit hardboard to create templates for each removable acrylic window panel.
PXL_20201125_115931904Cut and fit the two magnetic edge seals where two acrylic window panels meet to make sure that the size of the templates are just right when they are pushed Up/Down into place and the two aft corner panels are also pushed sideways into their vertical U-channels.
PXL_20201125_143934495.MPRinse and Repeat for all 15 window panels surrounding the SkyBridge and then take the templates back to the Hakan workshop to cut them all to size.
PXL_20201221_141347712Two weeks later, make Wayne’s day by bringing all 15 acrylic window panels to him on Möbius.
PXL_20201223_080125135.MPClean up all the edges of the acrylic panels and start fitting each numbered panel to its awaiting U-channel frames.
PXL_20201223_080139193Finish off the Black Sikaflex sealant and remove all the Blue painters tape.
PXL_20201223_080405387Let Wayne double check that the EPDM seals squeeze each acrylic window panel to his just right Goldilocks fit to help them seal and be rattle proof.

Sheesh!  Some Owners are SO fussy!
PXL_20201223_080552036Peel off all the protective plastic covering on the outside and ….
PXL_20201223_080632921 ……. inside of each acrylic panel.

Note the 10 year guarantee!
PXL_20201223_105201917.MPClean up the Sikaflex seals on the inside and clean off all the aluminium with solvent.
PXL_20201223_105351841Let Mr. Fussy get his kicks by checking out how slickly and strongly these magnetic strips old the vertical edge joints together and get tighter as the wind pushes against them.
PXL_20201223_105929636Sides and Aft end panels all in place now with their magnetic seals and Black edge trim.
PXL_20201223_110802698.MPFinish putting in the Black EPDM strips on the three front facing windows.
PXL_20201225_092829292.MPStand back and take a tour around the boat to admire this outstanding job!
PXL_20201225_103154314Crystal clear view out the Aft facing windows from the outside and …..
PXL_20201225_103245634 …… the inside.
PXL_20201225_103230551And all clear from the Upper Helm Captain!
PXL_20201223_083739660.MPAnd looks eXtremely sharp from the outside too!

Well done Hakan Glass!  Gold stars to you all with our thanks for such clearly outstanding work!
And that’s a wrap for the week, the month and the year that was 2020!

Happy New Year to one and all and we can’t wait to bring you the final episodes as all of us on Team Möbius renew our efforts to finish off Project Goldilocks and put this awemazing boat, and her Owners where they belong; IN THE WATER!!!

See you again next week as we get 2021 off to a rapid start!

-Wayne













PXL_20201122_095015832

What if Beauty & the Beast had a Love Child? XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 07-12, 2020

What if Beauty & the Beast had a Love Child? XPM78-01 Möbius Progress Update 07-12, 2020

With Team Möbius back to work and augmented by additional sub-contractors the rate of progress was at an all time high this past week so there is a LOT to Show & Tell you about this week.  I will apologise in advance that this week’s Progress Update may be a bit rushed both because I have so much to cover and it is now already mid afternoon on Sunday here.  But before I jump right into all the progress updates, some other news from around the shipyard for you.

FINAL PLANS are SIGNED & SEALED!

Baris & Dincer signing Addendum v2-5The biggest news for Christine and I this week is that we finalized all the details for the final finishing of XPM78-01 Möbius with Naval Yachts and signed off on all the new addendum documents, which is what Baris (left) and Dincer, the founding brothers of Naval Yachts are smiling about here! 
With projects of this size and complexity and especially for such a unique first XPM series build, there are a LOT of changes and adjustments along the way and a LOT of equipment, materials and sub-contractors that needed to be ordered and it has taken all of us more hours than we would like to know, to sort out all these details and get them all formally documented.  So we were elated to have all four of us, Builders + Owners, sign off on this Friday afternoon.

Wayne Looses 1 old Titanium Screw and Gains 7 new ones!

Immediately after we all signed the new addendum on Friday, my elation transformed into something else when I spent several hours “under the knife” in the Dentist’s office!  Another reason why this blog post will be a bit rushed as I’m not quite up to full  speed again just yet. 
For those curious to know, the scorecard from that surgery is that Wayne is now:

MINUS:

  • one molar and
  • one titanium screw (one of more than a hundred I have from a nasty motorcycle accident back in 1997) but now plus 6 titanium implant

PLUS:

  • 7 titanium implant screws
  • some extra jawbone (grafts)
  • 29 stitches

dental-implants-massachusetts-nhI won’t bore you with any more details but given the somewhat technical nature of my posts and for those curious about dental implants, as I was, here is these 2 illustrations will give you the basic picture of what’s involved.

implant2Now it is just a waiting game to get the stitches removed in 10 days and then let the jawbone and implants merge for two months or so before I go back to have the ceramic (Zirconia) crowns put in and I can chew again!

Möbius gets a New Neighbor

PXL_20201202_073019553.MP

This actually happened two weeks ago so I’m a bit delinquent in posting this but we now have a new neighbor off of Möbius’ Stbd Aft corner. 
PXL_20201202_070022961.MPShe’s a Turkish flagged boat “Celeb” and is in the yard at Naval Yachts for some relatively minor work and some out-of-the-water winter storage.
PXL_20201202_073028119Once again, our friendly neighborhood 72 wheel Yellow boat mover was called in for this move and it all came off without a hitch as usual.
PXL_20201207_063306545There were more changes to the neighborhood a few blocks away from us over on the Free Zone side of the harbour where they are completely redoing the shoreside facilities to put in an all new humungous dry dock and other launching facilities.
PXL_20201207_063311854This work has been going on for quite a few months already with the removal of the existing concrete walls, the whole rail launch and TraveLift launch facilities and a whole lot of dirt to enlarge the water area.

That leaves the Free Zone with no launching facilities but fortunately just on the other side of this harbor in the background here, is Setur Marina and so the authorities can open up the gates and let the boat movers bring boats in/out of the marina and into the Free Zone. 

With Möbius’ launch date *hopefully* coming up early in the New Year it is likely that we may need to launch into Setur Marina rather than inside the Free Zone harbour.  Either way works fine as the emphasis for us is LAUNCH ASAP!!


PXL_20201207_063309337This pile driver has been running non-stop 24/7 for the past week putting in over 20 so far of these steel cylinders which I presume will be filled with concrete to form the underlying foundation for all the new concrete and dry-dock equipment to come.
OK, with this week’s episode of  “What’s New in the Neighborhood”, let’s get back to the shipyard and get you caught up on this past week’s progress on finishing XPM78-01 Möbius.

LITTLE JOBS = BIG DEAL:

As I did in last week’s posting, let me quickly run you through a set of several “little jobs” which got looked after this past week.  Some of you sent in comments noting that you liked the more rapid-fire sequences of work so I will repeat that here and please do let me know how well it is working or not by putting your comments in the “Join the Discussion” box at the bottom of every blog posting.

And as I noted last week these may be “little” in terms of amount of work, these jobs are all play very important roles themselves and perhaps most important of all are what define a FINISHED yacht!

PXL_20201207_065803494First good example of how these little jobs can be so important was the finishing of the door into the Engine Room.  Uğur and Nihat had fabricated and mounted this door many months ago but it needed to be fully insulated with fireproof EPDM insulation covered with the laminated aluminium/composite sandwich AlucoBond material you have seen being used to cover all the walls and ceilings of the Engine Room and Workshop.

They started by welding in these short lengths of aluminium L-bars for the AlucoBond to be fastened to.
PXL_20201207_074407324Then Nihat cut the 50mm / 2” thick EPDM foam insulation and fitted each piece into their compartments.
PXL_20201207_091641911.MPAlucoBond is then cut to size and screwed in place.
PXL_20201207_091651554.MPUğur than installs two of the same beautiful Bofor Dogs & Latches you saw him installing in the big AL hatches up on the main deck for the Forepeak and Engine Room.
PXL_20201208_075045601Then the door can be remounted on its hinges while it awaits the 26mm thick tempered glass window to be installed to complete this door.
PXL_20201208_082758414Next up for the same basic treatment was this hatch that goes into the floor in the SuperSalon to provide the only access to the cavernous Basement which sits under the entire SuperSalon floor.
PXL_20201208_085739733.MPSame 50mm EPDM foam is inserted into each of the little bays formed by the reinforcing AL stringers of this hatch, which is upside down here BTW.

Then Uğur spreads on a light coating of contact cement while ……….
PXL_20201208_085748314.MP……. Nihat cuts out the thick foil covered fireproof cloth that will cover and protect the EPDM insulation.
PXL_20201208_105411719With the foil cloth all glued down, Nihat finished off the edges with some AL foil tape and this hatch was then mounted to the awaiting piano hinge in the Salon floor opening into the Basement.
PXL_20201210_091317725The first of many “little” jobs in getting the below the waterline portion of the hull all prepped for the upcoming application of all the epoxy primer preceding spraying on the International InterSleek 1100SR Foul Release bottom paint we have decided to use.

Here Uğur has removed the propeller blades on the Vetus Bow Thruster and sanded all the internal AL surfaces.
PXL_20201208_094130489I was able to pull my weight a little bit this week as well by finishing off some similarly small but important jobs, as well as one quite BIG BEAUTIFUL BEASTLY job on Mr. Gee, our Gardner 6LXB engine.  More on that later.

The Black cone and disk up near the top Left here is the front end of the Chain based Hand Cranking system that I am now starting to mount.  I have pulled it far forward here in order to mount the cast AL coolant tank.

Below this tank on the Right is the secondary fuel filter and return line and in the weeks ahead you will be seeing much more of that flat rectangular Pad in the bottom Left where I will soon be mounting one of the Big Red Electrodyne alternators.
PXL_20201208_094136808A classic example of how Gardner leaves nothing to chance is this cast in place detail of how you need to use the correct type of anti-freeze and fill it to the correct level.
PXL_20201210_143328346Big Red #2 near the bottom Left with blue taped box, as I’ve taken to calling the second 250A @ 28V Electrodyne alternators is the much bigger job I worked on this past week and I’ll cover that in more detail a bit later in this post.  With this 2nd alternator now securely mounted to the side of Mr. Gee I was able to finish installing these beautiful copper oil lines that snake their way around Mr. Gee to carry his lifeblood engine oil to and from where it needs to go.


PXL_20201210_143324987Large AL unit taking up the center of of the photo above and aft end here, is the complete fuel pump and mechanical injection system.  The six vertical (5 Black 1 Red) levers you see in the photo above allow you to hand prime each of the 6 fuel injectors as well as shut off one injector at a time to check performance while running.

Burgundy cylinder in the top middle is the secondary oil filter housing with its copper oil lines bringing oil to/from this filter.
PXL_20201210_143238782A few more finishing touches on Mr. Gee’s Stbd/Right side such as the exiting salt water hose now connected to the rear of this gorgeous cast bronze engine oil cooler, and the vertical braided SS mesh exhaust connector in the upper Left here is now bolted to the aft end of the cast iron exhaust manifold.
PXL_20201210_143154653In the bottom middle of the photo above and up close here, the Black 24V Starter is now fully installed and connected.  Two Red cables as one is from the twin FireFly G31 starter batteries and the other cable can connect the starter to the massive House Battery Bank in case the starter batteries should ever not be working.

Beauty & the Beast’s Love Child?

Gardner 6LXB CLOSEUP alternator strap mount exploded diagram

Take note in the 2 photos above of how Gardner attaches the starter to the massive cast aluminium crankcase with that silver strap and you can see in this illustration from the 6LXB Parts Manual how they attached the standard Gardner alternator in the same way over on the opposite side.

PXL_20201130_091059790I wanted to mount Big Red #2, which is what I’ve come to call the second Electrodyne alternator, to the same place that Gardner used but would Big Red fit?  Only one way to find out; try it!  As did Gardner, I first made 2 shims from some AL 10mm plate to adjust the radius of the cast in place ribs to match Big Red’s 188mm / 7.4” outside diameter and bolted them in place as you can see here.
PXL_20201130_091053884Here is an uncluttered straight on shot of the mounting base for Big Red #2.  Fuel pump bowl in the upper Left corner, bottom of the cast AL injection pump running across the top and you can see the two “nubbins” where the hinge pin will slide through to hold the forked bolt that tightens the flat strap to cinch the alternator up tight.
PXL_20201127_132125627That forked bolt is part # 11/19/20 in the illustration above but with Big Red being a bit on the Beastly side of the girth scale the original forked bolt was too short so I whipped up this new larger and longer version out of some SS plate and threaded rod.
PXL_20201127_134248126.MPI fashioned the fork out of a small block of SS and tapped it for a M10 threaded rod and threaded the two together.  A SS nut to lock it in place and then for added safety and strength I thought it best to TIG weld the nut and threaded rod to the fork.
PXL_20201123_121423664I will give you that I can be given to some hyperbole and eXaggeration from time to time but I think you need to give me that it is no eXaggeration to suggest that “shoehorn fit” describes this situation?!!
PXL_20201123_121407320Each GE 250-24 Electrodyne alternator tips the scales at 40 kg/88 lbs and so again I will make my case that calling these Red Beauties Beasts is also no mere Hodgins Hyperbole!
PXL_20201125_125418339As you might imagine, I had to take Big Red #2 in and out quite a few times as I adjusted its position and tested out the strap mounting setup to get that all to work out and still  clear everything.  Fortunately and as I’ll explain in a bit, took advantage of the fact that I had to take these alternators apart so I was able to cut their weight down quite a bit which made all my test mounting a bit less muscle building.
PXL_20201130_090928226With the alternator temporarily held in place with some wood blocks I could test out the fit of this Black strap which is has a 10mm / 3/8” pin that slides through the bottom as you can see in the illustration above and the bottom of this photo. 

Up at the top you can see the nut on the end of the upper forked bolt what cinches the alternator tight up against the radiused ribs you saw earlier.

I am close here BUT the large copper wires that carry the AC current out of the alternator need to come through that hole in the case across from my fingers, so I need to nudge it forward a wee bit more so the strap clears the hole.
PXL_20201123_121426909Oh, and I also need to make sure that the length of this Jack Shaft with U-joints on each end that I am retrofitting to drive Big Red #2 from the Gardner PTO (Power Take Off) on the Left here.

(click to enlarge any photo)

Electrodyne E 250-24 specs   graphI’m getting ahead of myself a bit so let me stop and provide a quick overview of these Electrodyne E 250-24 alternators that I’ve chosen to use and mount on Mr. Gee which I think will help you see how they truly are the Goldilocks combination or “Love Child” of Beauty and the Beast. 
In addition to these basic specs my primary reasons for choosing these Electrodyne brutes include:

  • truly rugged “beastly” construction and weighing in at 40kg / 88 lbs each
  • Beautiful simplicity with only one moving part, the stator shaft and no moving electrical parts
  • More simplicity being Brushless with no brushes and no brush springs
  • One piece steel “double ended” housing with TWO alternators; one at each end.
  • Remote Rectifier which moves most of the performance robbing heat outside the ER
  • eXceptional life with 20,000 hours  between recommended servicing

PXL_20201124_135938081Here is what one looks like in real life.  The box on top is simply a junction box where the 6 (3 from each alternator)AC current carrying wires emerge from inside the alternator body and connect to six large cables that go to the remote rectifiers outside the ER in the Workshop.
I ordered these alternators directly from Electrodyne in Oklahoma almost 2 years ago and spent a LOT of time with Dale Gould who is the Operations Manager at Electrodyne and he has been truly fabulous to work with on every level from getting these beasts built to the specs we decided upon, getting them shipped to me (not as easy as it sounds) and even creating little how to videos to show me how to do the alterations I needed on my end.  Can’t thank Dale and his team enough nor recommend them more highly to you.

PXL_20201123_125232591In the interim, I ended up changing how and where I was going to mount these two beastly beauties on Mr. Gee and so I now needed change the location of these Junction Boxes from where I had originally asked Dale to position them.  Not a big deal and I always welcome any chance to get “up close and personal” with every bit of kit on Möbius as I’m also the guy that needs to maintain everything and keep us up an running at all times in all conditions.
PXL_20201124_134411083The aluminium Junction Boxes are bolted to the steel housing and to reposition them I needed to re-drill and tap (thread) four new holes for the new position. 

First step was to remove the two pressed on aluminium ROTORS which have all the permanent magnets embedded in them and rotate around a few millimeters away from the stationary Stator coils you see here.
PXL_20201124_134037297With the Non-Drive end Rotor off I could now remove the Rotor on the Drive end by pressing out it and its shaft from the internal hub and bearings inside the case.
PXL_20201124_134032959This close up of the inside of the AL Rotor let’s you see how all the permanent magnets such as the two I’m pointing at here, are embedded into the AL Rotor.
PXL_20201124_120154113I know this is riveting Show & Tell for so many of you, NOT! but the disassembly goes pretty quickly from here so I’ll speed through the process even faster for you from here.

Top Lid comes off the Junction Box enabling me to disconnect all the wires from their studs in the sides of the Junction Box body.
PXL_20201124_115044100Each set of Stator windings, one at each end, can now be unbolted and …….
PXL_20201123_135125891…… pulled off of their tight fit to the central hub inside the housing allowing me to now carefully pull the three large gauge solid copper wires and terminals out through the holes in the housing one at a time.
PXL_20201124_115805591One end Stator windings removed, ready to spin around and do the same to remove the Stator windings on the other end.

Removing 4 Allen head bolts, one seen in the bottom Right here, let’s me remove each Junction Box.
PXL_20201123_151212610Full dis-assembled now!

Possibly resembling Dr. Frankenstein’s workbench I am already LOVING my new Workshop and all 11 meters of workbenches!
PXL_20201124_084516773I marked the new location of the Junction Boxes with felt pen and so now it was a simple matter of lining up the 2 holes in the bottom of the Junction Box with the new holes in the housing and clamping them in position.  I could then use the 4 bolt holes in the Junction Box as a template to mark the corresponding center marks to drill into the housing.
PXL_20201124_105407408I had carefully taped off all access to the inside of the housing to prevent any metal chips or dust from getting inside and it was a bit tricky to drill the 4 holes into the housing at this angle but it worked out fine and I could then cut the 10-32 threads into the housing with my tap set.
PXL_20201124_112801551And now re-attach the Junction Box in its new permanent location on the housing with the 4 Allen head bolts you see here in each corner of the Junction Box.
PXL_20201124_120148496The trickiest part of the reassembly was fishing the thick stiff solid copper wires back through the hole in the Junction Box and housing as they just barely have enough room to fit through and the hole is behind the Stator windings, but it all went smoothly and I soon had all 6 Stator wires and both Field Wires all back in place and ready to connect to their awaiting studs in the sides of the Junction Box
PXL_20201205_072756095One done; one to go!

But I need to wait to mount the Junction Box on the lower Big Red #2 on the side of Mr. Gee as you saw above because I need to strap it in first and THEN I can bolt the Junction Box to the housing OVER TOP of the strap.
PXL_20201204_093851598As you can see, all my trial and fit had made a bit of a mess so I needed to put back some of the Beauty into these two Beasts with a good sanding and repainting.
PXL_20201204_093900588I just happened to have this short little Jack Shaft left over from another project and in a lovely stroke of synchronicity it worked out to be the Goldilocks solution to drive Big Red #2 from the gear driven PTO on Mr. Gee.  So it needed a matching paint job as well.
PXL_20201205_064102850.MPWith all the openings and AL rotors all plugged and masked off it didn’t take me long to shoot these with three coats of Red International “Perfection” epoxy. 
PXL_20201205_072756095Although it was not the ideal shade of Red, a bit on the orangey side ….
PXL_20201205_072804595…… they definately looked better than when I started and were now all ready to be installed onto Mr. Gee. 

Hopefully Dale and all his team at Electrodyne will like what he sees too.

Now let’s quickly get onto the mounting of Big Red #2!!

I will try to mount BR#1 next week so stay tuned for more scintillating story telling then! Smile
PXL_20201209_120140437By now I was getting pretty quick at mounting BR#2 to the side of Mr. Gee and I wanted to do one final test fit of the Junction Box to double check that everything really did clear.
PXL_20201209_120133890To my absolute joy and delight everything just barely cleared!  Click to enlarge this photo or any other and you can see how close some of those fits are.
PXL_20201210_143350130If you look closely you will see that there are a LOT of close fits! 
PXL_20201210_143415830I think this must be some polar opposite of Murphey’s Law where the stars align and every close fit actually cleared!

Fortunately for me, mounting Big Red #2 on that upper flat pad you saw earlier will be a breeze compared to this one and I hope to get that done next week and will show you the results.

CHAING STOPPER:

PXL_20201207_121636753Up at the Bow on the Anchor Deck, we needed to install this latest bit of boat jewellery; our gleaming solid SS Lewmar 13mm Chain Stopper!

It is a very simple system that can become eXtremely critical if your snubber line breaks in a big storm and you need to have a way to “for sure” hold your anchor chain to the boat no matter what.  Yes, ask me how I know!
PXL_20201207_120350060Uğur and I quickly sketched up the design we thought would work best to solidly bolt this Chain Stopper to the deck framing and he had it all fabricated out of 20mm / 3/4” AL plate and was welding it to the Anchor Deck plate.
PXL_20201207_132430429Simple arched platform that elevates the Chain Stopper to be at the correct height of the chain as it comes off the gypsy chainwheel on the Maxwell VWC 4000 windlass and then the Chain Stopper is through bolted with 4 M16 SS bolts and nuts.
PXL_20201207_134200667A bit of Blue Threadlocker to make sure these never come loose but are still easy enough to unbolt if ever needed.
PXL_20201207_151922644One more “little but important” job done and checked off the list.

ELECTRICAL WORK:

PXL_20201208_074929996.MPHilmi was a welcome addition back on Team Möbius this week and he was right into the same theme of completing many more of those little but important electrical jobs.

He started with this one; putting in the connections for Mr. Gee’s two G31 FireFly Carbon Foam starter batteries.


PXL_20201208_075003433First Hilmi mounted the Red Start Battery Shut Off Switch and ran the cables from there to the Battery Box locations.
PXL_20201209_071928930Each battery will be enclosed in it’s own dedicated plastic battery box and mounted at the very far end of the Stbd/Right side wing of the Workshop underneath the Day Tank and up against the WT Bulkhead there.

They go forward another 40cm/16” from here and their lids just clear the 127mm/5” rubber exhaust hose that runs overtop of them.

PXL_20201209_071914716Now time to tame all these electrical snakes slithering out of the Engine Room!
PXL_20201209_083259750One of the best features of our decision to put in a dedicated Engine Room enclosure is that we can keep this an “Engine only” Engine Room and locate almost everything else OUTSIDE the ER where they are much cooler, easier to access, less likely to be exposed in the case of fire and much easier to comply with all the ABYC and CE fire safety requirements. 

No batteries, no electronics, no fuel filters or tanks; nothing but Mr. Gee and his immediate systems such as heat exchangers and exhaust.

What wires we do need to bring inside the ER, mostly for the Electrodyne alternators, come through this one penetration under the floor of the same Stbd wing of the Workshop on the other side of this photo.
PXL_20201209_110130702Hilmi takes it all in stride as usual and he, Ramadan and Cihan soon have the new cable trays in place ……
…… PXL_20201210_143215673and start routing and fastening the cables in place alongside …….
PXL_20201210_143228988.MP…….  and then under Mr. Gee.

Cihan does EXHAUSTING WORK!

PXL_20201202_120607019Möbius’ Engine Room was a busy place this week as Cihan and Ramadan installed the Halyard Exhaust System which has been patiently waiting its turn down on the shop floor underneath Möbius for many months now.

As you might have noticed in some of the photos above, I had already installed the flexible SS woven mesh that bolts vertically to the aft end of Mr. Gee’s exhaust manifold.

So the fist part of the “dry” section of the Halyard Exhaust components to go in was the75mm/ 3” ID vertical SS riser you see here rising up here in the lower Right corner.

The two “wings” on this riser are where the two support rods will connect down to Mr. Gee to help stabilise them.
PXL_20201202_124011317My personal favorite bit of kit from Halyard is this beautifully crafted and polished SS water injection elbow which Cihan is assembling to its silicone bellows.
PXL_20201202_124021624Peering down for an inside view, you can see how the water jets are all distributed evenly around the inner circumference and make sure there is a very even spray and mixing of the seawater that is pumped through them with the exhaust gases exiting Mr. Gee. 

This is where the exhaust changes from dry to wet and where most of the noise and the heat is removed by the mixing of the seawater and the exhaust gases.
PXL_20201202_123902462Simple job now for Cihan to slide the soaped up silicone bellows to the awaiting downward angled 127mm / 5” pipe on the Halyard “Combi” Silencer/Separator that has previously been mounted on its dedicated shelf on the front ER WT Bulkhead wall.
PXL_20201202_142018661.MPAlmost a year ago now, Yigit and I had spent several months working with Oliver and his team of engineers at Halyard HQ in the UK to design this Goldilocks Exhaust System for XPM78-01 Möbius.  Together we exchanged countless 3D models that we were each creating and so it was wonderful to see this all fall into place like an accurately cut jig saw puzzle.
PXL_20201202_142009961.MPEven Cihan, who has installed countless exhaust systems in the many other yachts he has worked on was very impressed and asked “How did you DO that??!!”
PXL_20201202_143501699With everything dry fitted and checked Cihan and Ramadan could now tighten up all the connecting bolts and SS hose clamps.

Using plenty of Tef-Gel on all threads of course!
PXL_20201203_123545070All that remained to be done was install the three rubber hoses needed to complete this Goldilocks exhaust system.  Over on the far Left side is the Black 75mm/3” ID hose that quickly takes all the seawater in the bottom of the Silencer/Separator down to the dedicated AL pipe welded into the exiting Sea Chest and out to sea.

Next over to the Right is the White hose that delivers the fresh cold seawater up to the inlet pipe on that SS mixing elbow.

And then the large 127mm/5” ID Black hose transports the now cool and quiet exhaust gases from the Combi down and over to the AL pipe welded into the Stbd ER wall where it then connects to another short length of the same rubber exhaust hose and out the similarly welded in place AL exhaust exit pipe in the hull just above the WL.

DIVINE DINETTE TABLE & PEDESTAL SYSTEM:

Last I have time to cover in this week’s Show & Tell is yet another bit of boat jewellery and Rosewood; our Dinette Table!


PXL_20201207_092001988It was love at first sight for me about 2 years ago when I first spotted this Triton Deluxe 2-stage table pedestal at the Zwaardvis booth at the big METS Marine Trade conference every year (except this one of course) in Amsterdam.

This is the fully lowered position which lowers the surface of the table to be flush with the surrounding seats where it can then become an additional Queen bed on those rare occasions when we have more quests, or more likely more Grandkids aboard than can be accommodated in the 2 beds in the Guest Cabin.
PXL_20201207_091906231Simply rotate those 2 SS handles and the air assist gas cylinder inside pushes the pedestal up to proper eating/working table height.
PXL_20201207_091915319But WAIT!  There’s MORE!

Check out that Kissin’ Cousin from Zwaardvis sitting to the side of the Triton pedestal!


Triton X-move sliderThis is the Triton T-System X-Move slider which allows you to slide the table top 200mm / 8” in the X or Y, Fore/Aft or Left/Right direction
PXL_20201207_093536309by simply pulling this lever which mounts under the table.  In the normal “fixed” position that little rectangular rubber pad on the Right is pressed up against the underside of the table and locks the table in whatever position you want.  Pulling the hand pulls the rubber down allowing you to push/pull the table wherever you want and then release the lever to lock in that position.  Brilliant!
PXL_20201208_095454023Over in the Cabinetry shop Ramadan #2, our newest Cabinetmaker has been busy building the Dinette Table top I designed.  Very simple and sturdy, it has 50mm/2” thick solid Ro$ewood edges surrounding a Rosewood laminated plywood table top.
PXL_20201208_095510680Ramadan cut this hardboard template so we could try it in place in the Dinette on the Triton pedestal and slider and check out the clearances with the table in all its different X, Y and Z positions.
PXL_20201208_095520688Once we had it just right, he was able to laminate both sides of some 20mm/ 3/4” marine plywood …..
PXL_20201208_095526367……. with Rosewood veneer in the lovely heated laminating press they have here at Naval.
PXL_20201209_081110609Mitre all the corners of the solid edging.
PXL_20201210_092310547.MPCut the biscuit joints and the glue and clamp it all ….
PXL_20201211_080236219to create a single solid table top.

All ready to have the large radii shaped into all these solid edges, sanding, filling and varnishing and I will soon be able to show you this next bit of beautiful art work aboard the good ship Möbius.
Well as usual I have much more to show you but I’m pooped, swollen and hungry as it is now after 21:00 here in Antalya on Sunday night so I’m going to call it quits for tonight and be back with much more next week.

Thanks SO much for taking time to get this far and join us on this grand adventure.  As always we REALLY appreciate you adding any and all comments and questions in the “Join the Discussion” box below so don’t be bashful now!  Your feedback is invaluable and VERY much appreciated.

Hope to see you here again next week.

– Wayne